Copperplate

Ireland : 10 items
Homann    Grosser Atlas Ueber Die Ganze Welt 1716
£575
47.5 x 57cm


A most attractive map of Ireland by Johan Baptist Homann, which first appeared in his Grosser Atlas Ueber Die Ganze Welt in 1716. The map is believed to be based on that of Nicholas Visscher the younger of 1689, which was the forerunner for many later copies and versions. Original colour.
Ref: IRL 002
 
B. Capper    Topographical Dictionary of the UK 1808
£15
21 x 18cm


Folding map of the northern half of Ireland. Benjamin Pitts Capper was the author of this topographical directory, first published by R. Phillips in 1808. The maps were engraved, and possibly drawn by H. Cooper. Later editions of the work carry the imprint of G.and W.B. Whittaker who re-published the book from 1825-34. This example is from the first edition of 1808, with the counties shown in original, full wash colour.
Ref: IRL 929
 
B. Capper    Topographical Dictionary of the UK 1808
£15
21 x 18cm


Folding map of the southern half of Ireland. Benjamin Pitts Capper was the author of this topographical directory, first published by R. Phillips in 1808. The maps were engraved, and possibly drawn by H. Cooper. Later editions of the work carry the imprint of G.and W.B. Whittaker who re-published the book from 1825-34. This example is from the first edition of 1808, with the counties shown in original, full wash colour.
Ref: IRL 930
 
J. Walker    British Atlas 1854-6 (1837)
£20
32 x 37.5cm


The Walker's British Atlas was first issued in 1837, and ran to many subsequent editions with frequent updates to railways and other information. This example is from the editions of 1854 or 1856 - so dated from the railways shown, the publisher's imprints, and the population figures quoted. Full wash colour.
Ref: IRL 1203
 
G. Mercator    Atlas 1595 - 1635
£275
47 x 34cm


The map shows the southern part of Ireland. Just before his death in 1594 Gerard Mercator had drawn and engraved a number of new maps of parts of the British Isles. His son Rumold included these in the 3rd part of the Atlas which he published in 1595. There were three new Irish maps - one of the island as a whole, one of the northern half, and this one of the southern half. These maps continued to be published in various editions of the Atlas until 1635.
Ref: IRL 1681
 
G. Mercator    Atlas 1595 - 1635
£275
47 x 34cm


The map shows the northern part of Ireland. Just before his death in 1594 Gerard Mercator had drawn and engraved a number of new maps of parts of the British Isles. His son Rumold included these in the 3rd part of the Atlas which he published in 1595. There were three new Irish maps - one of the island as a whole, this one of the northern half, and one of the southern half. These maps continued to be published in various editions of the Atlas until 1635.
Ref: IRL 1680
 
R. de Vaugondy    Nouvel Atlas Portatif 1778 (1762)
£125
22 x 24cm


This map by Didier Robert de Vaugondy (engraved by F. Dussy) first appeared in his Nouvel Atlas Portatif in 1762, the first state of the map also bearing this date in the title cartouche. This example is the second state, with the date removed, which appeared in the 1778 edition of the atlas. There was a third later state issued in 1806 by Delamarche (successor to the de Vaugondy's business) who simplified the cartouche and substituted his own name for de Vaugondy's). Original outline colour
Ref: IRL 001
 
Author not known.   Map of the House and Demesne of Horsehead, Situate in the Parish of Marmullane…and County of Cork c1850-59
£20
37 x 22cm


This plan, surveyed by Frederick A. Klein, was probably drawn up to support the enforced sale of the property, owned by William Lane. The map names as petitioners Colonel H.H. Hobson and wife, who were presumably creditors of the owner suing for repayment of the debt through sale of the house and its estate. The house is described by Lewis in 1837 as being "an elegant mansion in the Tudor style", and is still standing today. It was still owned by William Lane in 1850, but in 1859 it was offered for sale by the Bowland estate. Lane presumably sold it to Bowland some time in the 1850's. An interesting piece of social history. The map is laid on old blue paper.
Ref: IRL 003
 
T. Murray    An Atlas of the English Counties 1830
£15
45.5 x 69cm


The title page of Murray's county atlas states that the maps were "Projected on the basis of the Trigonometrical Survey by order of the hon.ble The Board of Ordnance, under the superindendance of T.L. Murray". This might seem to imply the project had at least the official blessing, if not the active involvement of the Ordnance Survey, but is more likely to be a marketing puff. Reeves. Murray's Atlas was first published in 1830, with second and third editions in 1831 and 1832, the latter with the adddition of electoral data. by 1838 the plates had been acquired by W. Robson & Co. who published and sold the maps individually, and also used them in their commercial directories. Apart from the English county maps, the atlas contained 4 larger general maps, including this double-page one of Ireland. This example is from the first edition of 1830. Original colour. Repaired tears to top and bottom centrefold, and to a few further short tears, or which a couple enter the border by c 1cm.
Ref: IRL 005
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain 1616 (1612)
£950
51 x 38cm


Connaught. John Speed's maps are amongst the most decorative examples of early, British cartography, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This copy is a rare example from the 1616 edition which was issued with Latin text to the verso. An unobtrusive, light waterstain to the lower left quadrant, but otherwise a superb example.
Ref: IRL 004