Copperplate

(Road Maps) : 65 items
J. Ogilby    Britannia 1675/1698
£185
44 x 33.5cm


Plate 48 - Oakham, Melton Mowbray, Nottingham, Mansfield, Rotherham, Barnsley. John Ogilby's Britannia was originally conceived as part of a larger, multi-volume atlas project, which was never completed. It was sufficient, however, to secure his enduring fame as the inventor of the strip road map. The work comprised 100 folio maps covering all the post roads and major cross roads in England and Wales. Each map had 6 or 7 strips at a scale of one inch to the mile. In their first state of 1675 the maps had no plate numbers, but these were added soon afterwards that same year. There was a second edition of the work in 1698. From 1719 onwards a number of derivative road books were published, all based on Ogilby, but typically at smaller scales, making them more convenient for the pocket. These included works by Senex, Gardner, Owen & Bowen, Jefferys and Kitchin, as well as derivative road maps in some of the 18th century magazines. This example is plate 48, covering the road from Oakham to Barnsley. The plate number inside the bottom-right corner indicates that this is the 3rd state of the map, first issued 1675 and also used in the later edition of 1698.
Ref: ROA 135
 
J. Ogilby    Britannia 1675/1698
£185
44 x 32.5cm


Plate 74 - Ipswich, Norwich, Aylsham, Cromer. John Ogilby's Britannia was originally conceived as part of a larger, multi-volume atlas project, which was never completed. It was sufficient, however, to secure his enduring fame as the inventor of the strip road map. The work comprised 100 folio maps covering all the post roads and major cross roads in England and Wales. Each map had 6 or 7 strips at a scale of one inch to the mile. In their first state of 1675 the maps had no plate numbers, but these were added soon afterwards that same year. There was a second edition of the work in 1698. From 1719 onwards a number of derivative road books were published, all based on Ogilby, but typically at smaller scales, making them more convenient for the pocket. These included works by Senex, Gardner, Owen & Bowen, Jefferys and Kitchin, as well as derivative road maps in some of the 18th century magazines. This example is plate 74 covering the road from Ipswich to Cromer.
Ref: ROA 102
 
J. Ogilby    Britannia 1675
£195
45 x 33cm


Plate 35 - Chippenham, Bath, Wells, Marlborough; and Devizes, Philips Norton, Chilcompton, Wells. John Ogilby's Britannia was originally conceived as part of a larger, multi-volume atlas project, which was never completed. It was sufficient, however, to secure his enduring fame as the inventor of the strip road map. The work comprised 100 folio maps covering all the post roads and major cross roads in England and Wales. Each map had 6 or 7 strips at a scale of one inch to the mile. In their first state of 1675 the maps had no plate numbers, but these were added soon afterwards that same year. There was a second edition of the work in 1698. From 1719 onwards a number of derivative road books were published, all based on Ogilby, but typically at smaller scales, making them more convenient for the pocket. These included works by Senex, Gardner, Owen & Bowen, Jefferys and Kitchin, as well as derivative road maps in some of the 18th century magazines. This map bears no plate number, marking it out as a first state issued in 1675. It covers two roads - from Chippenham to Marlborough, and from Devizes to Wells.
Ref: ROA 103
 
T. Gardner    A Pocket Guide to the English Traveller 1719
£50
27 x 17cm


Plate 2 - Islip, Broadway, Pershore, Worcester, Bromyard. Surprisingly it took 44 years before Ogilby's strip road maps were plagiarised by other publishers, the first challenger being Thomas Gardner. His 100 road maps were close copies of Ogilby's originals, apart from slightly different treatment of towns. The main raison d'etre for the work was that the maps were at half the scale. Although this might have been of some assistance to travellers, Garner's claim that this was a "pocket guide" still required a sizeable greatcoat pocket to cary it on an actual journey. It was soon overtaken by two smaller-format competitors - from Senex and from Owen & Bowen - that better met the need, and were much more commercially successful. It was never re-published, making it today one of the rarer 18th century road books.
Ref: ROA 109
 
T. Gardner    A Pocket Guide to the English Traveller 1719
£50
26 x 17cm


Plate 13 - Banbury, Stratford, Bromsgrove, Kidderminster, Bridgenorth; and Banbury, Shipston, Chipping Campden. Surprisingly it took 44 years before Ogilby's strip road maps were plagiarised by other publishers, the first challenger being Thomas Gardner. His 100 road maps were close copies of Ogilby's originals, apart from slightly different treatment of towns. The main raison d'etre for the work was that the maps were at half the scale. Although this might have been of some assistance to travellers, Garner's claim that this was a "pocket guide" still required a sizeable greatcoat pocket to cary it on an actual journey. It was soon overtaken by two smaller-format competitors - from Senex and from Owen & Bowen - that better met the need, and were much more commercially successful. It was never re-published, making it today one of the rarer 18th century road books.
Ref: ROA 110
 
T. Gardner    A Pocket Guide to the English Traveller 1719
£45
27 x 17.5cm


Plate 64 - Lampeter, Builth Wells, Brecknock, Cardiff. Surprisingly it took 44 years before Ogilby's strip road maps were plagiarised by other publishers, the first challenger being Thomas Gardner. His 100 road maps were close copies of Ogilby's originals, apart from slightly different treatment of towns. The main raison d'etre for the work was that the maps were at half the scale. Although this might have been of some assistance to travellers, Garner's claim that this was a "pocket guide" still required a sizeable greatcoat pocket to cary it on an actual journey. It was soon overtaken by two smaller-format competitors - from Senex and from Owen & Bowen - that better met the need, and were much more commercially successful. It was never re-published, making it today one of the rarer 18th century road books.
Ref: ROA 105
 
T. Gardner    A Pocket Guide to the English Traveller 1719
£55
27.5 x 18cm


Plate 72 - Hereford, Worcester, Droitwich, Bromsgrove, Alvechurch, Solihull, Meriden, Coventry, Whetstone, Leicester. Surprisingly it took 44 years before Ogilby's strip road maps were plagiarised by other publishers, the first challenger being Thomas Gardner. His 100 road maps were close copies of Ogilby's originals, apart from slightly different treatment of towns. The main raison d'etre for the work was that the maps were at half the scale. Although this might have been of some assistance to travellers, Garner's claim that this was a "pocket guide" still required a sizeable greatcoat pocket to cary it on an actual journey. It was soon overtaken by two smaller-format competitors - from Senex and from Owen & Bowen - that better met the need, and were much more commercially successful. It was never re-published, making it today one of the rarer 18th century road books. Supplied mounted and recently coloured.
Ref: ROA 111
 
T. Gardner    A Pocket Guide to the English Traveller 1719
£55
26.5 x 18cm


Plate 97 - Alresford, Winchester, Ringwood, Poole; and Poole, Christchurch, Lymington; and Southampton to Winchester . Surprisingly it took 44 years before Ogilby's strip road maps were plagiarised by other publishers, the first challenger being Thomas Gardner. His 100 road maps were close copies of Ogilby's originals, apart from slightly different treatment of towns. The main raison d'etre for the work was that the maps were at half the scale. Although this might have been of some assistance to travellers, Garner's claim that this was a "pocket guide" still required a sizeable greatcoat pocket to cary it on an actual journey. It was soon overtaken by two smaller-format competitors - from Senex and from Owen & Bowen - that better met the need, and were much more commercially successful. It was never re-published, making it today one of the rarer 18th century road books. This map covers 3 roads in Hampshire and Dorset.
Ref: ROA 117
 
J. Senex    An Actual Survey of All the Principle Roads of England and Wales 1719-72
£30
24 x 15cm


Plate 44 - Chipping Campden, Evesham, Worcester, Tenbury, Ludlow, Bishop's Castle, Montgomery . The year 1719 saw the publication of two reduced versions of John Ogilby's road maps from Britannia. That of Thomas Gardner was commercially unsuccessful, that of John Senex proved very popular, probably because Senex's volume was smaller and more portable than his competitor's, and because he claimed to have corrected and updated Ogilby. The basic format still followed Ogilby, with the same 100 maps and the same numbers of strips per page, but titles were simplified and without dedications to local gentry. Senex's volume was re-issued many times, up to c1792, later editions being published by Senex's widow, Mary (from 1742), by John Bowles (from 1757), and by Robert Wilkinson (from 1780).
Ref: ROA 112
 
J. Senex    An Actual Survey of All the Principle Roads of England and Wales 1719-92
£30
22 x 15.5cm


Plate 72 - Hereford, Worcester, Droitwich, Bromsgrove, Solihull, Meriden, Coventry, Whetstone, Leicester. The year 1719 saw the publication of two reduced versions of John Ogilby's road maps from Britannia. That of Thomas Gardner was commercially unsuccessful, that of John Senex proved very popular, probably because Senex's volume was smaller and more portable than his competitor's, and because he claimed to have corrected and updated Ogilby. The basic format still followed Ogilby, with the same 100 maps and the same numbers of strips per page, but titles were simplified and without dedications to local gentry. Senex's volume was re-issued many times, up to c1792, later editions being published by Senex's widow, Mary (from 1742), by John Bowles (from 1757), and by Robert Wilkinson (from 1780).
Ref: ROA 113
 
J. Senex    An Actual Survey of All the Principle Roads of England and Wales 1719-92
£25
21 x 15cm


Plate 87 - Oxford, Farringdon, Malmesbury, Bristol. The year 1719 saw the publication of two reduced versions of John Ogilby's road maps from Britannia. That of Thomas Gardner was commercially unsuccessful, that of John Senex proved very popular, probably because Senex's volume was smaller and more portable than his competitor's, and because he claimed to have corrected and updated Ogilby. The basic format still followed Ogilby, with the same 100 maps and the same numbers of strips per page, but titles were simplified and without dedications to local gentry. Senex's volume was re-issued many times, up to c1792, later editions being published by Senex's widow, Mary (from 1742), by John Bowles (from 1757), and by Robert Wilkinson (from 1780). A little light staining.
Ref: ROA 104
 
T. Kitchin    Kitchin's Post-Chaise Companion 1767/1770
£40
20 x 15cm


Plates 24 and 25 - Harding, Denbigh, Beaumaris, Holyhead; and London, Basingstoke, Andover, Salisbury. The strip maps for Kitchin's road book are based on those of Senex, though the roads are drawn at varying scales. The plates are printed back-to-back on both sides of the sheet to reduce weight and improve portability. The work was first published in 1767, with re-issues in 1770 and in c1780. This sheet covers the road along the north Welsh coast to Anglesey and Holyhead, and the start of the road from London down to Cornwall.
Ref: ROA 097
 
Laurie & Whittle N. Coltman    Laurie & Whittle's New Traveller's Companion 1806
£35
25.5 x 30cm


Plate 4 - Roads in the Isle of Wight. Robert Laurie and James Whittle's road book was conceptually different from the Ogilby model of following just one major road from it's origin to its end destination. The publishers offered a work with 24 effectively, sectional maps, each covering the major road network in a given area. County borders, coasts,rivers, and major towns were plotted with their correct topographical relationships, but roads were mainly shown as straight lines linking the main towns. Although smaller towns and settlements along the roads were marked, their positioning on the map did not truly reflect their relative positions on the ground. Different types of roads were differentiated by how they were delineated. The maps were drawn and engraved by Nathanial Coltman, and the work was first published in 1806. There were a number of regular, later editions (with some additions and refinements) up to 1846. This example is plate 4 covering the Isle of Wight's road network local distances being shown from Newport. It is dated 1806, and is thus from the first edition of the work.
Ref: ROA 115
 
Laurie & Whittle N. Coltman    Laurie & Whittle's New Traveller's Companion 1815 (1806)
£45
25 x 29.5cm


Plate 23 - Roads from London to Huntingdon, Crowland, Cambridge, Ely, Wisbech, Newmarket, King's Lynn and north-west Norfolk. Robert Laurie and James Whittle's road book was conceptually different from the Ogilby model of following just one major road from it's origin to its end destination. The publishers offered a work with 24 effectively, sectional maps, each covering the major road network in a given area. County borders, coasts,rivers, and major towns were plotted with their correct topographical relationships, but roads were mainly shown as straight lines linking the main towns. Although smaller towns and settlements along the roads were marked, their positioning on the map did not truly reflect their relative positions on the ground. Different types of roads were differentiated by how they were delineated. The maps were drawn and engraved by Nathanial Coltman, and the work was first published in 1806. There were a number of regular, later editions (with some additions and refinements) up to 1846. This is plate 23 from the 1815 edition, showing roads from London through Middlesex, Herts and Cambridgeshire and on to north-west Norfolk and parts of Suffolk.
Ref: ROA 1704
 
D. Paterson    Paterson's British Itinerary 1796 (1785)
£20
8.5 x 17cm


Strips 153 - 156 - Stafford, Eccleshall, Nantwich, Tarporley, Chester. Daniel Paterson was responsible for a number of road books and maps during the last 35 years of the 18th century. One of his most successsful venture was Paterson's British Itinerary, first-published in two volumes in 1785 by Carington Bowles. The work comprised 360 small strip maps, usually printed two to the page, on both sides of the sheet. The maps were novel in including not only the main road followed, but other roads and geographical detail (e.g. gentlemen's seats) a couple of miles on either side of the route. There were several later, and modified, editions up to 1807. This example is from the first edition of 1785.
Ref: ROA 133
 
D. Paterson    Paterson's British Itinerary 1796 (1785)
£20
8.5 x 17cm


Strips 329-332 - Newmarket to Bury St Edmunds; and Colchester, Ipswich, Woodbridge, Saxmundham. Daniel Paterson was responsible for a number of road books and maps during the last 35 years of the 18th century. One of his most successsful venture was Paterson's British Itinerary, first-published in two volumes in 1785 by Carington Bowles. The work comprised 360 small strip maps, printed two to the page, on both sides of the sheet. The maps were novel in including not only the main road followed, but other roads and geographical detail (e.g. gentlemen's seats) a couple of miles on either side of the route. There were several later, and modified, editions up to 1807. This example is from the second edition of 1796.
Ref: ROA 1437
 
J. Cary    Cary's Suvey of the High Roads from London... 1801 (1790)
£60
12.5 x 19cm


Strips 19-22 - The Road from London to Tring. Cary's work was presumably intended to cover a regional need for road maps covering the main roads into and out of London from the home counties. It comprised 2 general maps, and 80 strip maps, printed two to one side of a sheet. The scale was a uniform one inch to the mile, and the 40 sheets covered roads to 26 locations. The maps are usually found in attractive, original colour, and show good detail along the routes, such as toll booths and gentlemen's houses. Unfortunatley Cary did not start each new road on a new page, or even a new strip, which can mean that, when separated, a small part of a road is included on the next sheet. These 2 pages comprise strips 19 to 21, which show most of the road from London to Tring, apart from the last 3 miles into Tring, which would be on strip 22. In compensation, strip 19 begins with the last 2 miles of the road from London to Amersham. The two sheets, which are from the 1801 edition of the work, are mounted and framed side by side.
Ref: ROA 100
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 3/4 - High Wycombe, Tetsworth, Oxford, Islip, Morton-in-the-Marsh, Broadway. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 037
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 15/16 - Grantham, Newark, Tuxford, Doncaster. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 039
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 17/18 - Ferrybridge, Tadcaster, York, Boroughbridge, Northallerton. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 040
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 19/20 - Darlington, Durham, Chester-le-Street, Newcastle, Morpeth. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 154
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 23/24 - London, Colnbrook, Maidenhead, Reading, Newbury, Hungerford, Marlborough. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example is from the first edition of 1720. Top and right-hand margin trimmed obliquely a couple of millimetres within the printed area.
Ref: ROA 1472
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£17
11.5 x 17.5cm


Pages 29/30 - Wendover, Aylesbury, Buckingham, Banbury, Stratford, Caughton. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example is from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: ROA 1469a
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-1764
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 35/36 - Abingdon, Faringdon, Lechlade, Fairford, Gloucester, Mitcheldean, Monmouth. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 043
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 39/40 - Burton, Swansea, Llanelli, Kidwelli, Haverfordwest, St. Davids. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 044
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 43/4 - Sittingbourne, Preston (Faversham), Boughton St. Canterbury, Barham, Dover. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 046
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18.5cm


Pages 53/54 - Towcester, Daventry, Coventry, Coleshill, Lichfield. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 141
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 17cm


Pages 59/60 - London, Brentford, Hounslow, Staines, Egham, Bagshot. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. On this example the road map is printed on one side of the page only, the verso carrying part of the description of London.
Ref: ROA 048
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 63/64 - Shaftesbury, Sherborne, Yeoveil, Axminster, Exeter, Chudleigh. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 147
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 65/66 - Ashburton, Plymouth, Looe, Fowey, Tregony. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 051
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18.5cm


Pages 67/68 - Tregony, Penzanze, St. Buryon, Land's End. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example is from the first edition of 1720. It has a road map on one side only, the verso carrying part of the description of London.
Ref: ROA 052
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 75/76 - Woodgate, Lamberhurst, Hawkhurst Newended, Rye. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has a road map on one side only, the verso carrying part of the description of London.
Ref: ROA 054
 
J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 77/78 - Andover, Amesbury, Warminster. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has a rpad map on one side only, the verso carrying part of the description of London. It is from the first edition of 1720
Ref: ROA 005
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 79/80 - Maiden Bradley, Bruton, Bridgewater, Dulverton. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 055
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 81/82 - South Molton, Barnstaple, Torrington, Launceston, Camelford. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example is from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: ROA 056
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Brittania Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 93/94 - Garstang, Lancaster, Kendal. Perith, Carlisle. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.This example is from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: ROA 156
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 101/102 - Tempsford, St. Neots, Stilton, Peterborough. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. Modern colour.
Ref: ROA 150
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 17.5cm


Pages 103/104 - Market Deeping, Bourne, Sleaford, Lincoln, Brigg, Barton-upon-Humber. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 060
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
10 x 17.5cm


Pages 111/112 - Tenby, Ludlow, Bishop's Castle, Montgomery. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has a road map on one side only, the verso carrying a description of the Bedford Levels.
Ref: ROA 062
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 17.5cm


Pages 121/122 - Oakham, Melton Mowbray, Nottingham, Mansfield, Clowne, Rotherham, Barnsley. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 063
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 123/124 - Barnsley, Halifax, Keighley, Skipton, Kettlewell, Richmond. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. Modern colour.
Ref: ROA 139
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 145/146 - Hereford, Leominster, Ludlow, Church Stretton, Shrewsbury. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 068
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 149/150 - Bristol, Wells, Glastonbury, Taunton, Wellington, Exeter. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 069
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 17cm


Pages 161/162 - Jedburgh, Berwick / Carlisle, Berwick. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This sheet has the road map on one side only, the verso carrying a text description of Cambridge University. Modern colour.
Ref: ROA 160
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£15
9 x 16.5cm


Pages 165/166 - Llanfillyn, Tregynon, Llanbadarn, Fynydd, Builth Wells, Brecon. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 070
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 169/170 - Dartmouth, Newton Abbot, Exeter, Tiverton, Bampton, Mnehead. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 071
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-1764
£15
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 173/174 - Llanarth, Lyanrhystud, Talybont, Machynlleth, Llanymawddwy, Llangower, Llyn Tegid, . In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example is from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: ROA 143
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 175/176 - Bala, Betws, Gwerfil Goch, Ruthin, Holywell . In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has a road map to one side only, the verso carrying a description of Exeter.
Ref: ROA 073
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 195/196 - Ipswich, Norwich, Aylsham, Cromer. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 130
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 201/202 - King's Lynn, Billingford, Norwich, Great Yarmouth. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example is from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: ROA 1284
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 17.5cm


Pages 207/208 - Nottingham, Newark, Lincoln, Market Rased, Brigsley, Grimsby. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 138
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 219/220 - Oxford, Banbury, Coventry, Ashby, Derby. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 081
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11 x 17.5cm


Pages 225/226 - Presteigne, New Radnor, Builth Wells, Llandovery, Carmarthen. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 082
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 231/232 - Tynemouth, Newcastle, Ovington, Hexham, Haltwhistle, Carlisle. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 083
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-1764
£17
11.5 x 17.5cm


Pages 241/242 - Elland, Riponden, Rochdale, Manchester, Warrington, Frodsham, Chester; and Manchester, Stockport, Disley. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 085
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18.5cm


Pages 245/246 - Carmarthen, Cardigan, Lampeter, Trefilan, Aberystwyth. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 086
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11 x 18cm


Pages 253/254 - Exeter, Colyford, Lyme Regis, Chideock. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has a road map on one side only, the verso carrying descriptions of Dorchester and Lyme Regis.
Ref: ROA 088
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 257/258 - Leaming, Catterick, Richmond, Barnard Castle; and Ferrybridge, Pontefract, Wakefield; and Ferrybridge, Boroughbridge, Ripon. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 089
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 267/8 - Mold to Hoywell/Chester to Holywell. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has the road maps on one side only, the verso being a county map of Durham (trimmed to the left hand border and uncoloured).
Ref: ROA 171
 
D. Paterson    Paterson's British Itinerary 1785
£17
8.5 x 17cm


Strips 79-82 Broughton to Edinburgh;and Stilton to Bourne via Peterborough. Daniel Paterson was responsible for a number of road books and maps during the last 35 years of the 18th century. One of his most successsful venture was Paterson's British Itinerary, first-published in two volumes in 1785 by Carington Bowles. The work comprised 360 small strip maps, printed two to the page, on both sides of the sheet. The maps were novel in including not only the main road followed, but other roads and geographical detail (e.g. gentlemen's seats) a couple of miles on either side of the route. There were several later, and modified, editions up to 1807. This example is from the first edition of 1785.
Ref: ROA 169
 
J. Ogilby    Britannia 1698 (1675)
£255
45 x 33cm


Plate 52 - Newmarket to Wells; and Newmarket to Bury St. Edmunds. John Ogilby's Britannia was originally conceived as part of a larger, multi-volume atlas project, which was never completed. It was sufficient, however, to secure his enduring fame as the inventor of the strip road map. The work comprised 100 folio maps covering all the post roads and major cross roads in England and Wales. Each map had 6 or 7 strips at a scale of one inch to the mile. In their first state of 1675 the maps had no plate numbers, but these were added soon afterwards that same year. There was a second edition of the work in 1698. From 1719 onwards a number of derivative road books were published, all based on Ogilby, but typically at smaller scales, making them more convenient for the pocket. These included works by Senex, Gardner, Owen & Bowen, Jefferys and Kitchin, as well as derivative road maps in some of the 18th century magazines. This example is plate 52, covering two East Anglian roads from Newmarket. It is from the 1698 edition of the work.
Ref: ROA 136
 
D. Paterson    Paterson's Itinerary 1800-1807 (1785)
£12
8.5 x 17cm


Strips 301-304 Woburn to Newport Pagnell / Northampton, Ashby, Market Harborough. Daniel Paterson was responsible for a number of road books and maps during the last 35 years of the 18th century. One of his most successsful venture was Paterson's British Itinerary, first-published in two volumes in 1785 by Carington Bowles. The work comprised 360 small strip maps, printed two to the page, on both sides of the sheet. The maps were novel in including not only the main road followed, but other roads and geographical detail (e.g. gentlemen's seats) a couple of miles on either side of the route. There were several later, and modified, editions up to 1807. This copy bears no date and was therefore issued in the 1800, 1803 or 1807 editions of the work. Modern colour.
Ref: ROA 170
 
J. Hinton    The Universal Magazine of Knowledge & Pleasure 1765-73
£12
36.5 x 30cm


London to St. Davids. From 1765 John Hinton's Universal Magazine included from time to time a set of 39 road maps based upon Gardner's 1719 version of Ogilby's Britannia. These have typically 8 strips to the page, as in this example which covers the first half of the road from London to St. Davids. The sheet has some light stains, repaired tears and a narrow left-hand margin. It is priced accordingly.
Ref: ROA 172
 
J. Ogilby    Britannia 1675
£95
45.5 x 32cm


Carlisle to Berwick. John Ogilby's Britannia was originally conceived as part of a larger, multi-volume atlas project, which was never completed. It was sufficient, however, to secure his enduring fame as the inventor of the strip road map. The work comprised 100 folio maps covering all the post roads and major cross roads in England and Wales. Each map had 6 or 7 strips at a scale of one inch to the mile. In their first state of 1675 the maps had no plate numbers, but these were added soon afterwards that same year. There was a second edition of the work in 1698. From 1719 onwards a number of derivative road books were published, all based on Ogilby, but typically at smaller scales, making them more convenient for the pocket. These included works by Senex, Gardner, Owen & Bowen, Jefferys, and Kitchin, as well as derivative road maps in some of the 18th century magazines. This example of Ogilby's map has no plate number, and is therefore from the first edition of Britannia in 1675. Some minor restoration to 2 worm holes in the vertical margins, just touching the printed area in the left margin.
Ref: ROA 166
 
T. Gardner    A Pocket Guide to the English Traveller 1719
£45
27 x 17.5cm


Plate 78 - Nottingham, Newark, Lincoln, Market Rasen, Grimsby . Suprisingly it took 44 years before Ogilby's strip road maps were plagiarised by other publishers, the first challenger being Thomas Gardner. His 100 road maps were close copies of Ogilby's originals, apart from slightly different treatment of towns. The main raison d'etre for the work was that the maps were at half the scale. Although this might have been of some assistance to travellers, Garner's claim that this was a "pocket guide" still required a sizeable greatcoat pocket to cary it on an actual journey. It was soon overtaken by two smaller-format competitors - from Senex and from Owen & Bowen - that better met the need, and were much more commercially successful. It was never re-published, making it today one of the rarer 18th century road books.
Ref: ROA 174