Copperplate

T. Gardner : 6 items
T. Gardner    A Pocket Guide to the English Traveller 1719
£50
27 x 17cm


Plate 2 - Islip, Broadway, Pershore, Worcester, Bromyard. Surprisingly it took 44 years before Ogilby's strip road maps were plagiarised by other publishers, the first challenger being Thomas Gardner. His 100 road maps were close copies of Ogilby's originals, apart from slightly different treatment of towns. The main raison d'etre for the work was that the maps were at half the scale. Although this might have been of some assistance to travellers, Garner's claim that this was a "pocket guide" still required a sizeable greatcoat pocket to cary it on an actual journey. It was soon overtaken by two smaller-format competitors - from Senex and from Owen & Bowen - that better met the need, and were much more commercially successful. It was never re-published, making it today one of the rarer 18th century road books.
Ref: ROA 109
 
T. Gardner    A Pocket Guide to the English Traveller 1719
£50
26 x 17cm


Plate 13 - Banbury, Stratford, Bromsgrove, Kidderminster, Bridgenorth; and Banbury, Shipston, Chipping Campden. Surprisingly it took 44 years before Ogilby's strip road maps were plagiarised by other publishers, the first challenger being Thomas Gardner. His 100 road maps were close copies of Ogilby's originals, apart from slightly different treatment of towns. The main raison d'etre for the work was that the maps were at half the scale. Although this might have been of some assistance to travellers, Garner's claim that this was a "pocket guide" still required a sizeable greatcoat pocket to cary it on an actual journey. It was soon overtaken by two smaller-format competitors - from Senex and from Owen & Bowen - that better met the need, and were much more commercially successful. It was never re-published, making it today one of the rarer 18th century road books.
Ref: ROA 110
 
T. Gardner    A Pocket Guide to the English Traveller 1719
£45
27 x 17.5cm


Plate 64 - Lampeter, Builth Wells, Brecknock, Cardiff. Surprisingly it took 44 years before Ogilby's strip road maps were plagiarised by other publishers, the first challenger being Thomas Gardner. His 100 road maps were close copies of Ogilby's originals, apart from slightly different treatment of towns. The main raison d'etre for the work was that the maps were at half the scale. Although this might have been of some assistance to travellers, Garner's claim that this was a "pocket guide" still required a sizeable greatcoat pocket to cary it on an actual journey. It was soon overtaken by two smaller-format competitors - from Senex and from Owen & Bowen - that better met the need, and were much more commercially successful. It was never re-published, making it today one of the rarer 18th century road books.
Ref: ROA 105
 
T. Gardner    A Pocket Guide to the English Traveller 1719
£55
27.5 x 18cm


Plate 72 - Hereford, Worcester, Droitwich, Bromsgrove, Alvechurch, Solihull, Meriden, Coventry, Whetstone, Leicester. Surprisingly it took 44 years before Ogilby's strip road maps were plagiarised by other publishers, the first challenger being Thomas Gardner. His 100 road maps were close copies of Ogilby's originals, apart from slightly different treatment of towns. The main raison d'etre for the work was that the maps were at half the scale. Although this might have been of some assistance to travellers, Garner's claim that this was a "pocket guide" still required a sizeable greatcoat pocket to cary it on an actual journey. It was soon overtaken by two smaller-format competitors - from Senex and from Owen & Bowen - that better met the need, and were much more commercially successful. It was never re-published, making it today one of the rarer 18th century road books. Supplied mounted and recently coloured.
Ref: ROA 111
 
T. Gardner    A Pocket Guide to the English Traveller 1719
£55
26.5 x 18cm


Plate 97 - Alresford, Winchester, Ringwood, Poole; and Poole, Christchurch, Lymington; and Southampton to Winchester . Surprisingly it took 44 years before Ogilby's strip road maps were plagiarised by other publishers, the first challenger being Thomas Gardner. His 100 road maps were close copies of Ogilby's originals, apart from slightly different treatment of towns. The main raison d'etre for the work was that the maps were at half the scale. Although this might have been of some assistance to travellers, Garner's claim that this was a "pocket guide" still required a sizeable greatcoat pocket to cary it on an actual journey. It was soon overtaken by two smaller-format competitors - from Senex and from Owen & Bowen - that better met the need, and were much more commercially successful. It was never re-published, making it today one of the rarer 18th century road books. This map covers 3 roads in Hampshire and Dorset.
Ref: ROA 117
 
T. Gardner    A Pocket Guide to the English Traveller 1719
£45
27 x 17.5cm


Plate 78 - Nottingham, Newark, Lincoln, Market Rasen, Grimsby . Suprisingly it took 44 years before Ogilby's strip road maps were plagiarised by other publishers, the first challenger being Thomas Gardner. His 100 road maps were close copies of Ogilby's originals, apart from slightly different treatment of towns. The main raison d'etre for the work was that the maps were at half the scale. Although this might have been of some assistance to travellers, Garner's claim that this was a "pocket guide" still required a sizeable greatcoat pocket to cary it on an actual journey. It was soon overtaken by two smaller-format competitors - from Senex and from Owen & Bowen - that better met the need, and were much more commercially successful. It was never re-published, making it today one of the rarer 18th century road books.
Ref: ROA 174