Copperplate

J. Ogilby : 6 items

Maps

J. Ogilby    An Actuall Survey of Middlesex c1730 (1672/3)
£795
52.5 x 42cm


John Ogilby is best known for his road maps, titled Britannia, but this was intended as only part of a larger project to included an English county atlas. Only 3 maps for the county atlas were ever produced - Kent, Essex and Middlesex. Unusually, in an age of plagiarism, they were based on original surveys. The Middlesex map was engraved by Walter Binneman, and was first published in 1672-3. This example is the later re-issue by George Willdey who acquired the printing plates sometime after Ogilby's death in 1676, and would have sold the map as an individual item, and in composite atlases such as his edition of Saxton's atlas in c1730.A light water stain to the top-right corner, a repair to the lower centrefold and re-margined with minor restoration to the trimmed lower border. Still an attractive copy of a rare map.
Ref: MID 001
 

Road Maps

J. Ogilby    Britannia 1675/1698
£185
44 x 33.5cm


Plate 48 - Oakham, Melton Mowbray, Nottingham, Mansfield, Rotherham, Barnsley. John Ogilby's Britannia was originally conceived as part of a larger, multi-volume atlas project, which was never completed. It was sufficient, however, to secure his enduring fame as the inventor of the strip road map. The work comprised 100 folio maps covering all the post roads and major cross roads in England and Wales. Each map had 6 or 7 strips at a scale of one inch to the mile. In their first state of 1675 the maps had no plate numbers, but these were added soon afterwards that same year. There was a second edition of the work in 1698. From 1719 onwards a number of derivative road books were published, all based on Ogilby, but typically at smaller scales, making them more convenient for the pocket. These included works by Senex, Gardner, Owen & Bowen, Jefferys and Kitchin, as well as derivative road maps in some of the 18th century magazines. This example is plate 48, covering the road from Oakham to Barnsley. The plate number inside the bottom-right corner indicates that this is the 3rd state of the map, first issued 1675 and also used in the later edition of 1698.
Ref: ROA 135
 
J. Ogilby    Britannia 1675/1698
£185
44 x 32.5cm


Plate 74 - Ipswich, Norwich, Aylsham, Cromer. John Ogilby's Britannia was originally conceived as part of a larger, multi-volume atlas project, which was never completed. It was sufficient, however, to secure his enduring fame as the inventor of the strip road map. The work comprised 100 folio maps covering all the post roads and major cross roads in England and Wales. Each map had 6 or 7 strips at a scale of one inch to the mile. In their first state of 1675 the maps had no plate numbers, but these were added soon afterwards that same year. There was a second edition of the work in 1698. From 1719 onwards a number of derivative road books were published, all based on Ogilby, but typically at smaller scales, making them more convenient for the pocket. These included works by Senex, Gardner, Owen & Bowen, Jefferys and Kitchin, as well as derivative road maps in some of the 18th century magazines. This example is plate 74 covering the road from Ipswich to Cromer.
Ref: ROA 102
 
J. Ogilby    Britannia 1675
£195
45 x 33cm


Plate 35 - Chippenham, Bath, Wells, Marlborough; and Devizes, Philips Norton, Chilcompton, Wells. John Ogilby's Britannia was originally conceived as part of a larger, multi-volume atlas project, which was never completed. It was sufficient, however, to secure his enduring fame as the inventor of the strip road map. The work comprised 100 folio maps covering all the post roads and major cross roads in England and Wales. Each map had 6 or 7 strips at a scale of one inch to the mile. In their first state of 1675 the maps had no plate numbers, but these were added soon afterwards that same year. There was a second edition of the work in 1698. From 1719 onwards a number of derivative road books were published, all based on Ogilby, but typically at smaller scales, making them more convenient for the pocket. These included works by Senex, Gardner, Owen & Bowen, Jefferys and Kitchin, as well as derivative road maps in some of the 18th century magazines. This map bears no plate number, marking it out as a first state issued in 1675. It covers two roads - from Chippenham to Marlborough, and from Devizes to Wells.
Ref: ROA 103
 
J. Ogilby    Britannia 1698 (1675)
£255
45 x 33cm


Plate 52 - Newmarket to Wells; and Newmarket to Bury St. Edmunds. John Ogilby's Britannia was originally conceived as part of a larger, multi-volume atlas project, which was never completed. It was sufficient, however, to secure his enduring fame as the inventor of the strip road map. The work comprised 100 folio maps covering all the post roads and major cross roads in England and Wales. Each map had 6 or 7 strips at a scale of one inch to the mile. In their first state of 1675 the maps had no plate numbers, but these were added soon afterwards that same year. There was a second edition of the work in 1698. From 1719 onwards a number of derivative road books were published, all based on Ogilby, but typically at smaller scales, making them more convenient for the pocket. These included works by Senex, Gardner, Owen & Bowen, Jefferys and Kitchin, as well as derivative road maps in some of the 18th century magazines. This example is plate 52, covering two East Anglian roads from Newmarket. It is from the 1698 edition of the work.
Ref: ROA 136
 
J. Ogilby    Britannia 1675
£95
45.5 x 32cm


Carlisle to Berwick. John Ogilby's Britannia was originally conceived as part of a larger, multi-volume atlas project, which was never completed. It was sufficient, however, to secure his enduring fame as the inventor of the strip road map. The work comprised 100 folio maps covering all the post roads and major cross roads in England and Wales. Each map had 6 or 7 strips at a scale of one inch to the mile. In their first state of 1675 the maps had no plate numbers, but these were added soon afterwards that same year. There was a second edition of the work in 1698. From 1719 onwards a number of derivative road books were published, all based on Ogilby, but typically at smaller scales, making them more convenient for the pocket. These included works by Senex, Gardner, Owen & Bowen, Jefferys, and Kitchin, as well as derivative road maps in some of the 18th century magazines. This example of Ogilby's map has no plate number, and is therefore from the first edition of Britannia in 1675. Some minor restoration to 2 worm holes in the vertical margins, just touching the printed area in the left margin.
Ref: ROA 166