Copperplate

J. Senex : 4 items

Maps

J. Senex    Speculum Britanniae - Part 1 1723 (1593)
£175
20.5 x 17cm


John Norden's Speculum Britanniae (Mirror of Britain) was conceived as a project to gradually cover the whole country with a series of books each covering the topography and history of individual counties. The first part to be issued was of Middlesex, published in 1593, with text and 3 maps engraved by Peter van den Keere. The maps were of Middlesex, and the cities of London and Westminster. Although Norden continued work on his project for the rest of his life, only a few further counties were actually published during his lifetime, probably due to a lack of support after the death of Lord Burghley who had sponsored his early efforts. The accuracy of his maps is attested by the fact that his successor John Speed preferred to follow Norden rather than Saxton where both choices were available to him. Norden's map of Middlesex is noteworthy as being the first county map to include the major roads - it would be a further 100 years before roads began to appear on most county maps. There were later editions of Part 1 of the Speculum issued in 1623 and 1655, and a new version in 1723 with newly engraved plates by John Senex closely following the original designs. This example of the Middlesex map is believed to be from the 1723 edition - a most uncommon item. Supplied mounted ready for framing.
Ref: MID 011
 

Road Maps

J. Senex    An Actual Survey of All the Principle Roads of England and Wales 1719-72
£30
24 x 15cm


Plate 44 - Chipping Campden, Evesham, Worcester, Tenbury, Ludlow, Bishop's Castle, Montgomery . The year 1719 saw the publication of two reduced versions of John Ogilby's road maps from Britannia. That of Thomas Gardner was commercially unsuccessful, that of John Senex proved very popular, probably because Senex's volume was smaller and more portable than his competitor's, and because he claimed to have corrected and updated Ogilby. The basic format still followed Ogilby, with the same 100 maps and the same numbers of strips per page, but titles were simplified and without dedications to local gentry. Senex's volume was re-issued many times, up to c1792, later editions being published by Senex's widow, Mary (from 1742), by John Bowles (from 1757), and by Robert Wilkinson (from 1780).
Ref: ROA 112
 
J. Senex    An Actual Survey of All the Principle Roads of England and Wales 1719-92
£30
22 x 15.5cm


Plate 72 - Hereford, Worcester, Droitwich, Bromsgrove, Solihull, Meriden, Coventry, Whetstone, Leicester. The year 1719 saw the publication of two reduced versions of John Ogilby's road maps from Britannia. That of Thomas Gardner was commercially unsuccessful, that of John Senex proved very popular, probably because Senex's volume was smaller and more portable than his competitor's, and because he claimed to have corrected and updated Ogilby. The basic format still followed Ogilby, with the same 100 maps and the same numbers of strips per page, but titles were simplified and without dedications to local gentry. Senex's volume was re-issued many times, up to c1792, later editions being published by Senex's widow, Mary (from 1742), by John Bowles (from 1757), and by Robert Wilkinson (from 1780).
Ref: ROA 113
 
J. Senex    An Actual Survey of All the Principle Roads of England and Wales 1719-92
£25
21 x 15cm


Plate 87 - Oxford, Farringdon, Malmesbury, Bristol. The year 1719 saw the publication of two reduced versions of John Ogilby's road maps from Britannia. That of Thomas Gardner was commercially unsuccessful, that of John Senex proved very popular, probably because Senex's volume was smaller and more portable than his competitor's, and because he claimed to have corrected and updated Ogilby. The basic format still followed Ogilby, with the same 100 maps and the same numbers of strips per page, but titles were simplified and without dedications to local gentry. Senex's volume was re-issued many times, up to c1792, later editions being published by Senex's widow, Mary (from 1742), by John Bowles (from 1757), and by Robert Wilkinson (from 1780). A little light staining.
Ref: ROA 104