Copperplate

Laurie & Whittle : 5 items

Maps

Laurie & Whittle N. Coltman    Laurie & Whittle's New Map of the County of York 1806
£175
68.5 x 52.5cm


A large dissected and linen-backed map folding into its original slip case. The map was engraved by Nathanial Coltman and published by Laurie & Whittle in 1806. Attractive original colour. Some pen and ink manuscript annotations adding a few Lancastrian and Cheshire towns to the lower-left area, possibly by a prevous owner who had links with the towns concerned. Uncommon.
Ref: YOR 053
 
Laurie & Whittle N. Coltman    Laurie & Whittle's New Traveller's Companion 1806
£35
25.5 x 30.0cm


Robert Laurie and James Whittle's road book was conceptually different from the Ogilby model of following just one major road from it's origin to its end destination. The publishers offered a work with 24 effectively, sectional maps, each covering the major road network in a given area. County borders, coasts,rivers, and major towns were plotted with their correct topographical relationships, but roads were mainly shown as straight lines linking the main towns. Although smaller towns and settlements along the roads were marked, their positioning on the map did not truly reflect their relative positions on the ground. Different types of roads were differentiated by how they were delineated. The maps were drawn and engraved by Nathanial Coltman, and the work was first published in 1806. There were a number of regular, later editions (with some additions and refinements) up to 1846. This example is plate 4 covering the Isle of Wight's road network local distances being shown from Newport. It is dated 1806, and is thus from the first edition of the work.
Ref: ROA 115
 

Foreign Maps

Laurie & Whittle    Complete Body of Ancient Geography 1795 (1763)
£95
74.5 x 53.5cm


The Ancient World. Originally published 1763 in Paris (as dated in the cartouche) J.B.B. d'Anville's map of "The World as known to the Ancients", was included in various composite atlases, compiled to individual customers' requirements. The plate later passed to the publishers Laurie & Whittle in London, who in 1795 re-issued the map in their Complete Body of Ancient Geography. This example is from this latter issue. D'Anville's map was used as the source or model for similar maps in many 19th century atlases of ancient geography.
Ref: FOR 029
 

Road Maps

Laurie & Whittle N. Coltman    Laurie & Whittle's New Traveller's Companion 1806
£35
25.5 x 30cm


Plate 4 - Roads in the Isle of Wight. Robert Laurie and James Whittle's road book was conceptually different from the Ogilby model of following just one major road from it's origin to its end destination. The publishers offered a work with 24 effectively, sectional maps, each covering the major road network in a given area. County borders, coasts,rivers, and major towns were plotted with their correct topographical relationships, but roads were mainly shown as straight lines linking the main towns. Although smaller towns and settlements along the roads were marked, their positioning on the map did not truly reflect their relative positions on the ground. Different types of roads were differentiated by how they were delineated. The maps were drawn and engraved by Nathanial Coltman, and the work was first published in 1806. There were a number of regular, later editions (with some additions and refinements) up to 1846. This example is plate 4 covering the Isle of Wight's road network local distances being shown from Newport. It is dated 1806, and is thus from the first edition of the work.
Ref: ROA 115
 
Laurie & Whittle N. Coltman    Laurie & Whittle's New Traveller's Companion 1815 (1806)
£45
25 x 29.5cm


Plate 23 - Roads from London to Huntingdon, Crowland, Cambridge, Ely, Wisbech, Newmarket, King's Lynn and north-west Norfolk. Robert Laurie and James Whittle's road book was conceptually different from the Ogilby model of following just one major road from it's origin to its end destination. The publishers offered a work with 24 effectively, sectional maps, each covering the major road network in a given area. County borders, coasts,rivers, and major towns were plotted with their correct topographical relationships, but roads were mainly shown as straight lines linking the main towns. Although smaller towns and settlements along the roads were marked, their positioning on the map did not truly reflect their relative positions on the ground. Different types of roads were differentiated by how they were delineated. The maps were drawn and engraved by Nathanial Coltman, and the work was first published in 1806. There were a number of regular, later editions (with some additions and refinements) up to 1846. This is plate 23 from the 1815 edition, showing roads from London through Middlesex, Herts and Cambridgeshire and on to north-west Norfolk and parts of Suffolk.
Ref: ROA 1704