Copperplate

Wales : 13 items
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain 1676-1719 (1612)
£850
51 x 38.5cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1611 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example of the map of Wales bears the publisher's imprint of Basset and Chiswell, whose edition of Speed's atlas was issued in 1676, although this imprint was unchanged for Christopher Browne's 1695 edition and for early issues by Henry Overton. The map is very decorative with town plans to the vertical margins of each of the county towns. A slight horizontal crease, but otherwise a very good and well coloured specimen.
Ref: WAL 013
 
R. Morden    Camden's Britannia 1695
£70
42 x 35.5cm


South Wales. Uncoloured. First Gibson Edition. Some offsetting. Repaired tear impinging c1cm within right hand border.
Ref: WAL 914
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£45
46.5 x 39.5cm


North Wales. Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County and general maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: WAL 916
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£45
52 x 39cm


South Wales. Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County and general maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: WAL 917
 
B. Capper    Topographical Dictionary of the UK 1808
£15
18 x 21cm


A folding map of the whole of Wales. Benjamin Pitts Capper was the author of this topographical directory, first published by R. Phillips in 1808. The maps were engraved, and possibly drawn by H. Cooper. Later editions of the work carry the imprint of G.and W.B. Whittaker who re-published the book from 1825-34. This example is from the first edition of 1808, with the counties shown in original, full wash colour. A small nick to right hand margin outside the platemark, not affecting the printed area.
Ref: WAL 920
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£40
56 x 47cm


North Wales. It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour. Bottom centrefold repair c 0.5cm into the printed area.
Ref: WAL 921
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£50
56 x 47cm


South Wales. It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: WAL 922
 
J. Duncan    A Complete County Atlas of England and Wales 1840-45 (1825)
£40
43.5 x 34cm


South Wales. Coloured. These maps were first published in 1825, and probably sold singly. In 1833 they were re-published by James Duncan in a thematic atlas to illustrate the representative changes brought about by the 1832 Reform Act. There were later re-issues in 1840 and 1845 with the addition of railways, and this map dates from one of these editions. A little light offsetting.
Ref: WAL 1128
 
C. Smith    New English Atlas (reduced maps) 1828 or 1833 (1822)
£30
23 x 19cm


In 1822 Charles Smith issued a county atlas with maps based on his larger county maps which had been in circulation for over 20 years. The new maps were smaller in scale, but the atlas bore the same title as that in which his larger maps appeared. They are clearly drawn and engraved, but although there were several editions of the atlas, they are today amongst the rarer of the 18th century county maps. This example of the map of South Wales is from the edition of 1828 or 1833, in which the maps have no date in the imprint, but before railways were added for the edition of 1844. Original outline colour. Slight staining to the top-right margin from the adjacent folding map of Yorkshire.
Ref: WAL 006
 
C. Smith    New English Atlas (reduced maps) 1828 or 833 (1812)
£35
23.5 x 19cm


In 1822 Charles Smith issued a county atlas with maps based on his larger county maps which had been in circulation for over 20 years. The new maps were smaller in scale, but the atlas bore the same title as that in which his larger maps appeared. They are clearly drawn and engraved, but although there were several editions of the atlas, they are today amongst the rarer of the 18th century county maps. This example of the map of South Wales is from the edition of 1828 or 1833, in which the maps have no date in the imprint, but before railways were added for the edition of 1844. Original outline colour.
Ref: WAL 005
 
G.A. Walpoole    New British Traveller 1784
£70
32 x 20cm


North Wales. The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. The 2 maps of South and North Wales, engraved by Thomas Conder, are larger, single-page maps, and are amongst the most atttractive in the set. The text pages covering Wales may be available on request at no extra charge. Supplied mounted.
Ref: WAL 012
 
A.M. Mallet    Description de L'Univers 1686
£60
9.5 x 15cm


Description de L'Univers was a small format 5 volume work with copperplate maps covering the whole world. It was one of Mallet's major works. This example of his map of Wales is from the 1686 German edition, with the map's title translated into German outside the top border.
Ref: WAL 001
 
H. Teesdale    New British Atlas 1830 (1812-14)
£12
41 x 34cm


South Wales. This detailed and well engraved map was one of a set first published around 1812-14 by Robert Rowe, who was probably also their draftsman and engraver. The maps were initially sold singly in folding format until their collective issue in 1816 as The English Atlas. The plates were later acquired by Henry Teesdale, who amended titles and imprints and re-issued the work as the New British Atlas in 1829, with several re-issues up to 1842. The plates were later acquired and used by H.G. Collins and then by G. Philip and Son, who both used them as the base for lithographic transfers for a variety of works up to c1860. This example of the map of south Wales is from the 1830 second edition of Teesdale's atlas. Original wash colour. A repaired internal tear c4cms. long, and another repaired tear entering the lower border by c10 cms. Priced accordingly.
Ref: WAL 008