Copperplate

J. Speed : 21 items
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1616 (1612)
£425
50.5 x 37.5cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This is an early example of the Bedfordshire map, dating from the edition of 1616 with Latin text to the verso instead of English. A minor repair to a lower centrefold split.
Ref: BED 049
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1623-32 (1612)
£850
51 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of G. Humble, dating its issue to 1623-32. G. Humble imprint. An excellent specimen
Ref: BUC 035
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1612-14 (1612)
£1250
52.5 x 38.5cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of Sudbury and Humble dating it to one of the earlier editions between 1611 and c1650. A couple of minor repaired marginal tears not impinging the printed area. The colouring is less skilful than the best examples, but still an attractive example of this popular map.
Ref: CAM 051
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1623-32 (1612)
£900
51 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of G. Humble, dating it to between 1623 and 1632. A few repaired marginal tears, not affecting the printed area. An attractively coloured specimen.
Ref: ESS 194
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1623-32 (1612)
£830
50.5 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of Sudbury and Humble, dating its issue to between 1611 and 1654. Repair to centrefold.
Ref: HRT 252
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1616 (1612)
£395
50.5 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This copy is an early example from the 1616 Latin text edition of the work, in which the descriptive text on the verso is in Latin rather than the usual English.
Ref: HUN 147
 
J. Speed    England Fully Described 1716-54 (1612)
£695
50 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of Henry Overton, who probably acquired the Speed plates in c 1713. Imprints began to be changed from c 1716, all being revised by c 1720. The maps were issued as a complete Speed atlas under the title indicated, but also used with other stock in the collation of "made-up" county atlases. the Speed plates were acquired by Dicey by 1754 when again issued with his imprint. Repair to centrefold.
Ref: KEN 315
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1612-14 (1612)
£470
50.5 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of Sudbury and Humble, making it an early example from the editions of 1611 or 1614. Repair to centrefold split.
Ref: LEI 342
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1612-76 (1612)
£675
51.5 x 38.5cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears no publishers' imprint and therefore dates from 1612-1654 (the next edition by Roger Rea in c1665 bears his name as publisher). A clean impression with attractive colouring. Small repair to lower centrefold.
Ref: LIN 360
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain 1676-1719 (1612)
£850
51 x 38.5cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1611 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example of the map of Wales bears the publisher's imprint of Basset and Chiswell, whose edition of Speed's atlas was issued in 1676, although this imprint was unchanged for Christopher Browne's 1695 edition and for early issues by Henry Overton. The map is very decorative with town plans to the vertical margins of each of the county towns. A slight horizontal crease, but otherwise a very good and well coloured specimen.
Ref: WAL 013
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1676 (1612)
£450
50 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of Basset & Chiswell, dating it to the 1676 edition. Repair to top centrefold.
Ref: NTN 520
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1676 (1612)
£1650
52 x 38.5cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of Basset & Chiswell dating it to the edition of 1676.
Ref: OXF 585
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1676 (1612)
£380
51 x 38.5cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of Basset & Chiswell, dating it to the edition of 1676. A small section of the bottom left hand border not printed probably due to the plate having been damaged before this date.
Ref: RUT 600
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1676 (1612)
£930
50.5 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of Basset & Chiswell, dating it to the edition of 1676. A most attractive map based on John Norden's original work.
Ref: SUS 690
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain 1612-1654
£550
51 x 38cm


Whole county. John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This is an early and most attractively coloured example of the Yorkshire bearing the imprint of Sudbury & Humble, dating it to 1612-54. A narrow right-hand vertical margin, and a small repair to a short internal tear without loss.
Ref: YOR 030
 
J. Speed    England Fully Described c1716-43 (1612)
£420
50 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of Henry Overton who probably acquired the Speed plates in c1713. Imprints began to be changed from c1716, all being revised by c1720. By the time the 1743 edition was published a number of maps had been further amended to delete giveaway dates. Monmouthshire is one of these, the original publication date of 1610 being removed. This example pre-dates this deletion. The maps were issued as a complete Speed atlas under the title indicated, but also used with other stock in the collation of "made-up" county atlases. By 1754 the Speed plates had been sold on to Dicey resulting in the next and final change of imprint.
Ref: MON 1335
 
J. Speed    England Fully Described in a Complete Set of Mapps of ye Countys of England and Wales, with their Islands c1713-43 (1612)
£420
50.5 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example can be dated to c1713-43 by the imprint of Henry Overton - one of the rarer imprints found on Speed maps - and could have been issued either in a complete Speed atlas, or in one of Overton's "composite" atlases, using individual maps from various sources. Overton probably also sold Speed's maps singly.
Ref: HRE 1241
 
J. Speed    England Fully Described in a Complete Set of Mapps of ye Countys of England and Wales, with their Islands c1713-43 (1612)
£425
50 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of Henry Overton - one of the rarer imprints found on Speed maps - and could have been issued either in a complete Speed atlas, or in one of Overton's "composite" atlases, using individual maps from various sources. Overton probably also sold Speed's maps singly.
Ref: NMB 1407
 
J. Speed    England Fully Described in a Complete Set of Mapps of ye Countys of England and Wales, with their Islands c1713-43 (1612)
£275
50.5 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This map bears the imprint of Henry Overton - one of the rarer imprints found on Speed maps - and could have been issued either in a complete Speed atlas, or in one of Overton's "composite" atlases, using individual maps from various sources. Overton probably also sold Speed's maps singly.
Ref: MTG 001
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain 1616 (1612)
£695
51.5 x 38.5cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example is from the rare and early Latin text edition of 1616. A repair to short centrefold plit with very minor loss (restored), and a couple of closed marginal nicks not affecting the image.
Ref: SHR 003
 
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain 1616 (1612)
£950
51 x 38cm


Connaught. John Speed's maps are amongst the most decorative examples of early, British cartography, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This copy is a rare example from the 1616 edition which was issued with Latin text to the verso. An unobtrusive, light waterstain to the lower left quadrant, but otherwise a superb example.
Ref: IRL 004