Copperplate

J. Cary : 103 items

Maps

J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£29
26.5 x 21cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: BER 025
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£90
53.5 x 48cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: BER 029
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£75
35.5 x 52cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the five editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G.&J. Robinson, with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour, or with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in original full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: BUC 041
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£100
48 x 53.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: BUC 044
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1793 (1787)
£28
21 x 26.5cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809 utilised these new plates. This example is from the edition of 1793. Original outline colour with later enhancement.
Ref: CAM 169
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£90
48 x 53.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: CAM 074
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£90
53.5 x 48cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: CHE 098
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£85
52 x 41cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by John Stockdale with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Very slight offseting to centre top.
Ref: COR 109
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£120
53.5 x 48cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: COR 112
 
J. Cary    British Atlas 1805 (1789)
£55
51 x 40cm


This map was first published in 1789 as part of a set of county maps included in the new Gough translation of Camden's Britannia. These maps were subsequently re-issued in 1805 as the British Atlas, from which this example emanates (so distinguished by the centrefold). Original outline colour.
Ref: CUM 103
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£75
48 x 53.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour. A few light stains.
Ref: CUM 125
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£90
48 x 53.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: DER 141
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£24
26 x 21cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: DUR 183
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£55
51.5 x 39.5cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G.& J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: DUR 184
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1809 (1801)
£65
53.5 x 48.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example of the Durham map is dated 1801, and would have come from the first full edition of the atlas issued in 1809. It is in original full colour. A slight crease across the top-right corner, and a repaired marginal tear not affecting the image, but otherwise a good copy.
Ref: DUR 027
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£37
26 x 21cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: ESS 198
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£39
21 x 26.5cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour. Supplied mounted and ready to frame, together with the original accompanying text page.
Ref: GLO 212
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£65
42 x 47.5cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Trimmed just within right border to fit the binding. Some folds.
Ref: GLO 213
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£90
48 x 55.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: GLO 216
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£24
21 x 26cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: HRE 240
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£25
42.5 x 52.5cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Close trimmed to right and left hand borders with some repaired tears and marginal "nibbles". A slight stain along one of the folds. Priced accordingly.
Ref: HRE 241
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£75
47 x 53.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour. Short repaired marginal tear, not affecting the printed area.
Ref: HRE 245
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£37
26 x 21cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: HRT 260
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£115
53.5 x 47.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: HRT 265
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£70
48 x 53.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: HUN 291
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£80
37 x 52.5cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Repairs to a couple of tears at folds, one slightly impinging the printed area.
Ref: LAN 332
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£24
21 x 26cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: LEI 350
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£75
47.5 x 53.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: LEI 354
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£24
21 x 26cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: LIN 367
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£75
48 x 54cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: LIN 372
 
J. Cary    Cary's New Six-Sheet Map of England and Wales with part of Scotland 1810-c1840
£35
50 x 44cm


Southern Scotland and parts of NW England and Northern Ireland. John Cary published a number different of multi-sheet maps of England and Wales at varying scales, often available in a number of different formats. This work was first published in 1818, with subsequent up-dated editions up to around 1840. This sheet is the top left of the six sheets, covering all of Southern Scotland as far north as the Firth of Tay, part of Northern Ireland and parts of Cumberland, Westmorland, Northumberland and the Isle of Man. Original outline colour.
Ref: REG 089
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£30
21.5 x 26cm


England and Wales. The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: BIS 905
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£20
24 x 34.5cm


Roman Britain. Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. Maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806. A few spots.
Ref: BIS 972
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£20
23 x 31cm


Saxon England. Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. Maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806.
Ref: BIS 973
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£45
46.5 x 39.5cm


North Wales. Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County and general maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: WAL 916
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£45
52 x 39cm


South Wales. Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County and general maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: WAL 917
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£40
56 x 47cm


North Wales. It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour. Bottom centrefold repair c 0.5cm into the printed area.
Ref: WAL 921
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£50
56 x 47cm


South Wales. It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: WAL 922
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£85
52.5 x 40cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: MID 384
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£95
53.5 x 48cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour. Repaired tear to centrefold.
Ref: MID 387
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£30
26.5 x 21cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour. Supplied mounted, ready to frame, and with the original, accompanying text page.
Ref: MON 397
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1789
£30
40.5 x 45cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by John Stockdale with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This uncoloured example is from the first Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1789. A little offsetting.
Ref: MON 398
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£50
40.5 x 45cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Close trimmed to right hand border to fit publication, but not affecting printed area.
Ref: MON 399
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£70
53.5 x 47.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour. A light crease.
Ref: MON 403
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£24
26.5 x 21cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: NTN 529
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£75
53.5 x 48cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour. Short repaired tear to bottom centrefold, not affecting the printed area.
Ref: NTN 534
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£55
39.5 x 51cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Close trimmed to right hand border but outside the printed area.
Ref: NMB 557
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£75
48 x 53.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: NMB 561
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£55
52 x 34.5cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Repair to short tear along fold, but not impinging the printed area.
Ref: NOT 576
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£33
21 x 26cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: OXF 589
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£75
39.5 x 51.5cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: OXF 590
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£100
48 x 53.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: OXF 594
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£22
26 x 21.5cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: RUT 609
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£70
53.5 x 48cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: RUT 614
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£24
21 x 26cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: SHR 625
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£50
42.5 x 49cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Close trimmed to right and left borders (within left hand border) to fit publication. A few repaired nicks and nibbles to margins and a short repaired tear along a fold. Folded to fit the format of the volume.
Ref: SHR 626
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£100
54 x 48cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: SOM 640
 
J. Cary    A New Map of Somerset Divided into Hundreds 1811 (c1801)
£70
50 x 49.5cm


Cary's large county maps were first issued individually from about 1801, before being collected into atlas format in 1809 under the title Cary's New English Atlas. There was a second edition of the atlas in 1811, for which the imprints on the maps were re-dated. The maps continued to be sold individually, and this example is dated 1811. It is dissected and linen-backed and folds into card covers, although it is missing the original slipcase. Original full-wash colour. it bears the signature of (probably) the original owner in the top-left corner.
Ref: SOM 011
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£29
21 x 26cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: STA 649
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£65
38.5 x 51.5cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: STA 650
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£90
48 x 54cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: STA 654
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£90
53.5 x 48cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: SUF 670
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£37
26.5 x 21cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: SUS 697
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£105
53.5 x 48cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour. A vertical crease, and some repaired tears at lower centrefold.
Ref: SUS 701
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£25
42 x 52cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Some damage and repairs to right hand border with some loss. Priced accordingly.
Ref: WAR 715
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£90
48 x 53.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: WAR 718
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£24
26 x 21cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: WES 728
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£55
48.5 x 39.5cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Repaired centrefold tear.
Ref: WES 729
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£75
53.5 x 48cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour. Repaired marginal tear to top centrefold not affecting the printed area.
Ref: WES 733
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£65
40.5 x 52cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: WIL 745
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£90
48 x 54cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: WIL 749
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£27
21 x 26cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: WOR 761
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£60
41 x 49.5cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: WOR 762
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£80
53 x 47.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: WOR 766
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£35
26.5 x 21cm


Whole county. The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: YOR 795
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£30
26.5 x 21cm


North Riding. The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: YOR 796
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£27
26.5 x 21cm


East Riding. The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: YOR 797
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£33
26.5 x 21cm


West Riding S.Part. The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour. Supplied mounted and ready to frame.
Ref: YOR 798
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£60
53 x 40.5cm


West Riding North Part. Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: YOR 800
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£60
52 x 32.5cm


West Riding - South Part. Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Repairs to a couple of tears along folds, one just within the border, the other marginal.
Ref: YOR 801
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£60
52.5 x 42cm


East Riding. Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Close trimmed to top border to fit the binding. Repaired tears and folds to top edge.
Ref: YOR 802
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£70
73 x 40.5cm


North Riding. Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. The right hand third of the map has been separately joined, as the publisher intended.
Ref: YOR 803
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806
£45
47.5 x 36cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. This map of the British Isles shows the judges circuits and accompanies a distance chart showing mileages between the main cities and shire towns. It is from the second Gough edition of Britannia published in 1806.It bears the date 1805 and the signature of Stockdale as publisher, but no others, and is tentatively assumed to be by Cary.
Ref: BIS 010
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1787
£30
21 x 26.5cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. Later editions from 1809 used a new set of plates, the originals being now well worn. This example is from the first edition of 1787 and is in original outline colour.
Ref: BED 036
 
J. Cary    Traveller's Companion 1790-1828 (1790)
£15
9 x 13cm


Original outline colour. Cary's Traveller's Companion was first published in 1790. It proved very popular as a pocket road book, and ran to several editions up to c 1828.
Ref: NMB 1219
 
J. Cary    A New Map of England and Wales with Part of Scotland 1794
£30
20.5 x 26.5cm


Western Durham and parts of surrounding counties. This bound work comprised 81 contiguous map sheets, together with an index sheet. It covered all of England and Wales plus the southern half of Scotland. This is sheet 59 which includes the western two-thirds of Durham, and parts of Yorkshire, Westmorland and Northumberland. This copy is dated 1794, and is thus a first edition, in original outline colour. There were several later, updated editions.
 
G. Cruchley J. Cary    Lennox's 40 Miles Round Leeds c1865
£295
125.5 x 98cm


This map has it's origins in the 1820's, when John Cary and his sons first published Cary's Improved Map of England and Wales, a set of 65 sectional maps covering England and Wales at the scale of 2 miles to the inch. The Carys may have followed OS maps where available, but for the northern half of the country especially they had to rely on their own and others' detailed survey work. In 1844 George Cruchley purchased the Carys' stock of printing plates, and, after changing titles and imprints, continued to issue his own maps and atlases from these plates, including this series. Cruchley's only significant amendment was the addition of the railways, and the maps must have been frequently updated to show the fast growing railway network. A switch to printing from lithographic transfers rather than the original copper plates would have made this somewhat easier. Cruchley sold the maps individually under the title "Reduced Ordnance Map of England and Wales", but was also happy to adapt the series to other commercial opportunities, as with this example. The map is actually composed of 4 "Cary" sheets - numbers 43,44,48 and 49, still using the original Cary numbering. The coverage encompasses Kirkby Lonsdale, Hunmanby, Lincoln, and Middlewich - I'e the west Riding of Yorks. with parts of the North and East Ridings and of Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Cheshire and Lancashre. Cruchley's name does not appear on the map, but a pasted-on printed label at the centre top gives the title "Map of 40 Miles Round Leeds" and the name of John Lennox, 40 Commercial Street, Leeds. Lennox was a wholesale and retail stationer and printer, and presumably approached Cruchley to provide him with this specially adapted map for local sale. It is dissected into 32 linen-backed segments, folding into boards covered in black leather, gilt, and is in attractive original hand-colouring. There is no date, and although I have seen other examples attributed to 1865, it could be earlier.
 
G. Cruchley J. Cary    Cruchley's County Atlas of England & Wales 1863 (1787)
£30
26.5 x 21cm


In 1844 George Cruchley purchased G. and C. Cary's stock of printing plates, and set about changing the titles and imprints to continue their productive life under his own name. Whereas the Carys had used intaglio printing, Cruchley turned to the fast growing method of printing by lithographic transfer, which offered greater flexibility in making quick changes. Cary's New and Correct English Atlas, first published in 1787, was now relaunched in 1863 as Cruchley's County Atlas of England & Wales. The atlas title page and the titles of individual maps placed great stress upon the inclusion of railways and stations, as to be seen to be keeping pace with the fast growing national railway network was a marketing necessity. This example dates from this 1863 issue after which the map title was changed for later issues of the atlas up to at least 1876.
Ref: COR 026
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£40
40 x 52.5cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586 with text in Latin. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the five editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new English translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G.& J. Robinson, with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. There was another edition of thew work in 1806, but this time published by J. Stockdale. The same maps were also used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805, again published by J. Stockdale. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour, or with full wash colour. This example is from the second edition of Gough's new translation of Britannia dating from 1806. The map of Huntingdon is especially noteworthy for the detailed delineation of the county's road network. Modern colour.
Ref: HUN 144
 
J. Cary    Traveller's Companion 1819 (1790)
£12
9 x 14.5cm


Cary's Traveller's Companion was first published in 1790 and marketed as a road book. The maps featured the whole county, but focused upon the main roads, which were shown with mileages along the route. The work proved an immediate success, so much so that by 1806 the printing plate was so worn that a new set of plates had to be engraved for the edition of that year. In 1822 a third set of plate was brought into use. The book continued to be popular, with its final edition being issued in 1862, now under the imprint of George Cruchley. This copy of the Hunts. map is from the edition of 1819. Original colour.
Ref: HUN 065
 
J. Cary    A New Map of England and Wales with Part of Scotland 1794
£15
20.5 x 26.5cm


Eastern parts of Suffolk and Norfolk . This bound work comprised 81 contiguous map sheets, together with an index sheet. It covered all of England and Wales plus the southern half of Scotland. This is sheet 36 which includes the eastern parts of Suffolk and Norfolk. This copy is dated 1794, and is thus a first edition, in original outline colour. There were several later, updated editions. A little light print offsetting
 
J. Cary    A New Map of England and Wales with Part of Scotland 1794
£15
20.5 x 26.5cm


Western parts of Suffolk and Norfolk . This bound work comprised 81 contiguous map sheets, together with an index sheet. It covered all of England and Wales plus the southern half of Scotland. This is sheet 35 which includes western portions of Suffolk and Norfolk. This copy is dated 1794, and is thus a first edition, in original outline colour. There were several later, updated editions. A little light print offsetting.
 
J. Cary    Cary's Traveller's Companion 1819 (1790)
£15
9 x 14cm


Cary's Traveller's Companion was first published in 1790. It proved very popular as a pocket road book, and ran to several editions up to c 1828. The plates were re-engraved for the editions of 1806 and 1822. This example is from the 1819 edition, using the second plate. Original outline colour.
Ref: BUC 003
 
J. Cary    Traveller's Companion 1792 (1790)
£10
9 x 3cm


Original outline colour. Slightly browned. Cary's Traveller's Companion was first published in 1790. It proved very popular as a pocket atlas and road book, and ran to several editions up to c 1828. This example is dated 1792, and is sold in a black and gold "Hogarth" frame.
Ref: HRT 1506
 
J. Cary    A New Map of England and Wales with Part of Scotland 1794
£35
20.5 x 26cm


North-east Yorkshire and south-east Durham. This bound work comprised 81 contiguous map sheets, together with an index sheet. It covered all of England and Wales plus the southern half of Scotland. These two sheets are numbers 60 and 61 covering the Yorkshire coast as far south as Hunmanby and inland as far as Northallerton, and the south-eastern part of Durham. They are dated 1794, and are thus from a first edition of the work, in original wash colour. There were several later, updated editions.
 
J. Cary    Cary's New Six-Sheet Map of England and Wales with part of Scotland (single sheet) 1810-c1840
£35
50 x 44cm


Southern Scotland and parts of NW England and Northern Ireland. John Cary published a number different of multi-sheet maps of England and Wales at varying scales, often available in a number of different formats. This work was first published in 1818, with subsequent up-dated editions up to around 1840. This sheet is the top left of the six sheets, covering all of Southern Scotland as far north as the Firth of Tay, part of Northern Ireland and parts of Cumberland, Westmorland, Northumberland and the Isle of Man. Original outline colour.
 
Gall & Inglis J. Cary    Gall & Inglis Half Inch Map of England c1908
£15
64.5 x 51.5cm


This map was first published by the Carys as sheet 34 of a 65 sheet map of England and Wales, issued between 1820 and 1830 on a scale of one half inch to the mile. The plates were bought by Cruchley around 1850, and subsequently by Gall & Inglis in 1877. This example bears their imprint, and dates from c1910 -20. It folds into card covers, and is described as the Lowestoft Section of Gall and Inglis' Half inch Map of England. The original Cary sheet numbering is still followed, this being sheet 34. The map is roughly dated by the advertisement on the back cover for the Contour Road Book of Ireland by Harry R.G. Inglis, which was first published 1908. Good condition.
Ref: SUF 023
 
J. Cary    A Description of the Country from Thirty to Forty Miles Round Manchester 1795
£45
21 x 25.5cm


West Riding. A Description of the Country …..Round Manchester was written by John Aikin and published in 1795 by John Stockdale. The work contained several maps including this one of the West Riding of Yorkshire. Although it bears no engraver's signature its style marks it out as being by John Cary who was associated with Stockdale in a number of projects. A repaired tear to the right-hand margin, just entering border, but otherwise in nice condition. Uncommon.
Ref: YOR 047
 
G. Cruchley J. Cary    Cruchley's County Atlas of England and Wales 1863-76 (1787)
£20
21.5 x 26.5cm


In 1844 George Cruchley purchased G. and C. Cary's stock of printing plates, and set about changing the titles and imprints to continue their productive life under his own name. Whereas the Carys had used intaglio printing, Cruchley turned to the fast growing method of printing by lithographic transfer, which offered greater flexibility in making quick changes. Cary's New and Correct English Atlas, first published in 1787, was now relaunched in 1863 as Cruchley's County Atlas of England & Wales. There were a number of further issues of the atlas up to at least 1876. Old repairs to centrefold tears leaving some brown marks.
Ref: SHR 022
 
J. Cary    Travellers Companion 1806 (1790)
£15
9 x 14.5cm


Cary's Traveller's Companion was first published in 1790. It proved very popular as a pocket road book, and ran to several editions up to c1828. The plates were re-engraved for the editions of 1806 and 1822. This example is from the 1806 edition. Original outline colour. A brown mark to the margin
Ref: SUF 069
 

UK and British Atlases

G. Cruchley J. Cary    Cruchley's County Atlas of England and Wales 1875 (1787)
£535
c26.5 x 21cm


In c1845 George Cruchley purchased most of the printing plates owned by the Cary family. He subsequently continued to issue many of their works, albeit with changed imprints, and printed by lithographic transfer rather than directly from the original copper plates. Cary's New and Correct English Atlas became Cruchley's County Atlas of England and Wales, first published as such in 1862. This is the 1875 edition of the work, with the maps hand coloured in wash and outline. 44 maps of the English counties (5 of Yorkshire), and 3 general maps of Englaand and Wales, North Wales and South Wales. The maps in nice condition. Quarter leather binding, the boards and spine a little rubbed, but otherwise a good copy of this atlas.
Ref: ABR 003
 

Road Maps

J. Cary    Cary's Suvey of the High Roads from London... 1801 (1790)
£60
12.5 x 19cm


Strips 19-22 - The Road from London to Tring. Cary's work was presumably intended to cover a regional need for road maps covering the main roads into and out of London from the home counties. It comprised 2 general maps, and 80 strip maps, printed two to one side of a sheet. The scale was a uniform one inch to the mile, and the 40 sheets covered roads to 26 locations. The maps are usually found in attractive, original colour, and show good detail along the routes, such as toll booths and gentlemen's houses. Unfortunatley Cary did not start each new road on a new page, or even a new strip, which can mean that, when separated, a small part of a road is included on the next sheet. These 2 pages comprise strips 19 to 21, which show most of the road from London to Tring, apart from the last 3 miles into Tring, which would be on strip 22. In compensation, strip 19 begins with the last 2 miles of the road from London to Amersham. The two sheets, which are from the 1801 edition of the work, are mounted and framed side by side.
Ref: ROA 100
 

Topographical prints - other areas

J. Cary    The Gentleman's Magazine 1810
£12
16.5 x 10cm


Beaconsfield Church. The Gentleman's Magazine was a long-runningand popular 18th century magazine which covered a wide range of subjects. This print of the church at Beaconsfield was engraved by J. Cary after a drawing by W. Hamper, and appeared in the magazine in 1810. It is supplied mounted, ready for framing.
Ref: TOP 002