Copperplate

G.A. Walpoole : 100 items

Maps

G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£35
16 x 20cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Cambridgeshire is re-margined on one side and sold ready-mounted.
Ref: CAM 111
 
G.A. Walpoole    Camden's Britannia 1784
£45
16 x 19.5cm


The New British Traveller. The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. The map of Herts is sold mounted ready for framing.
Ref: HRT 1513
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£35
22 x 11cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Kent is re-margined on two sides and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: KEN 007
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£35
18 x 11cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Surrey is re-margined on two sides and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: SUR 010
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£35
20 x 15.5cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Berkshire is re-margined on one side and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: BER 008
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£35
16 x 18.5cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Cumberland and Westmorland is re-margined on one side and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the counties may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: CUM 009
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£35
16 x 18.5cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Westmorland and Cumberland is re-margined on one side and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the counties may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: CUM 009
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£33
16 x 19.5cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Herefordshire is re-margined on one side and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: HRE 010
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£38
20 x 16cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Buckinghamshire is re-margined on one side and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: BUC 021
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£32
20 x 16cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Oxfordshire is close trimmed to the neat lines and has been re-margined and mounted ready for framing.
Ref: OXF 001
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£35
13.5 x 22cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Gloucestershire, which was engraved by T. Conder, is re-margined on two sides and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: GLO 010
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£29
11 x 19.5cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Monmouthshire is re-margined on one side and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: MON 1538
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£30
11 x 17.5cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Worcestershire is re-margined on two sides and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: WOR 1466
 
G.A. Walpoole    New British Traveller 1784
£70
32 x 20cm


North Wales. The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. The 2 maps of South and North Wales, engraved by Thomas Conder, are larger, single-page maps, and are amongst the most atttractive in the set. The text pages covering Wales may be available on request at no extra charge. Supplied mounted.
Ref: WAL 012
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£33
15.5 x 19cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Northumberland is re-margined on one side and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: NMB 010
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£65
30 x 19cm


Whole County. The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, but Yorkshire is an exception, being given a full page on account of its size. This and the decorative border makes it one of the most attractive maps in the set. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: YOR 032
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£30
16 x 20cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Northants. is re-margined on one side and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge. A small hole.
Ref: NTN 016
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£35
16 x 20.5cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Shropshire is re-margined on one side and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: SHR 035
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£33
22 x 11cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Leicestershire and Rutland is re-margined on two sides and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the county may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: LEI 015
 

Topographical prints - other areas

A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£5
17.5 x 15cm


Gothurst. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Gothurst (or Gayhurst) House is Elizabethan in date, though its estate dates back to the Norman conquest. The house is c4 miles from Newport Pagnell and survives today, having been converted into individual residential properties in the 1970's. This print was engraved by Lodge. A little foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 114
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22.5 x 34.5cm


Barnwell and Chesterton. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. At the time this print was taken, Barnwell and Chesterton were independent villages, but have since become suburbs of Cambridge. No artist's or engraver's signatures. A narrow right-hand margin, but with sufficient space to mount.
Ref: TOP 1433
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£5
24.5 x 16.5cm


Castle Camps. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Castle Camps was a Norman castle, around which grew the current village of the same name. It gradually fell into disrepair, and little today remains above ground, some of the wall being incorporated into Castle Farmhouse. The print bears no artist's or engraver's signatures. A few spots to the outer extremities of the wide margins.
Ref: TOP 109
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
23 x 35.5cm


East Gate, Chester; Sonne Gate, Coventry and Castle Ashby, Northants. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers 3 views on one sheet. Narrow vertical borders and a nick to the upper-left border.
Ref: TOP 153
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
22.5 x 33.5cm


Beeston Castle and Nantwich Church. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Beeston Castle was built in the 1220's by Ranulph de Blondeville, Earl of Chester. It was slighted by Cromwell during the civil war, and its ruins are today owned by English Heritage, who open it to the public. St. Mary's Church at Nantwich is one of the country's finest medieval churches and is grade 1 listed. Two prints on one sheet engraved by Lodge. A few brown spots and worm holes to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 138
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£20
30.5 x 22cm


The City of Chester. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This attractive print of Chester from across the river Dee bears no engraver's or artist's signatures. A couple of small worm holes and some light foxing to the margins, which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 1588
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16 x 10cm


Chester Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Chester Cathedral dates from 1093, when it was built as the Abbey Church of a Bendictine monastery, and has been the seat of the Bishop of Chester since 1541. This print was engraved by Goldar after a drawing by Hamilton. A few light-brown spots but otherwise in good order.
Ref: TOP 619
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£9
18.5 x 32cm


Beeston Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Beeston Castle was built in the 1220's by Ranulph de Blondeville, Earl of Chester. It was slighted by Cromwell during the civil war, and its ruins are today owned by English Heritage, who open it to the public. This print was engraved by Rennoldson, and offers two view of the castle. It is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 612
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18 x 15cm


Beeston Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Beeston Castle was built in the 1220's by Ranulph de Blondeville, Earl of Chester. It was slighted by Cromwell during the civil war, and its ruins are today owned by English Heritage, who open it to the public. This print was engraved by Lodge.
Ref: TOP 237
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
27 x 17.5cm


Lestwithiel Palace. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Stannary Palace at Loswithiel was built by the Earls of Cornwall in the second half of the 13th century. It comprised several buildings with a variety of functions - law courts, taxation of the Cornish lead industry, a gaol, seat of the Stanarry Parliament, and general administration. Although badly damaged in the civil war several of the buildings have survived or been restored and remain in use today - still with various uses. This ananymous print shows the ruins of the Great Hall and another building - possibly the Exchequer Hall. A couple of small holes and some light foxing to the margin, all of which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 142
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
17.5 x 14.5cm


Pendennis Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Pendennis Castle was built by Henry V111 between 1539 and 1545, to protect the entrance to the river Fal from possible attack. It stands on a headland on the west bank of the river just outside Falmouth, and is today owned by English Heritage who open it to the public and hire it out for conferences and weddings. This print was engraved by Lowry.
Ref: TOP 241
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
17.5 x 30.5cm


Derwenwater, Broad Water and Windermere. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print offers views of Cumbrian lakes. At the time it was taken the English Lake District was just beginning to find a wider audience for its picuresque beauty. Broad Water was the old name applied to two of the lakes - Bassenthwaite and Brothers Water. As this view of Broadwater is designated as in Westmorland it relates to the latter of the two.
Ref: TOP 116
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
24.5 x 15cm


Exeter. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers a perspective of Exeter from the south west.
Ref: TOP 082
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
24.5 x 16.5cm


Tavistock Abbey. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Tavistock Abbey was first founded in 961, though it had to rebuilt twice and most of the later buildings dated from the 15th century. It was a Benedictine foundation, located in the centre of the modern town of Tavistock. After the dissolution of the monasteries it fell graduallly into disrepair, was robbed of much of its stone, and the site rebuilt on. Today a few buidings from the complex survive, including the refectory, 2 gateways and a porch. This print has a little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 085
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 33.5cm


Mount Edgecumbe & Plymouth Docks. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Mount Edgecombe is a promontary on the west bank of the river Tamar looking across Plymouth Sound to the modern dockyards and city beyond. It gets its name from the Edgecumbe family whose estate was here located. Edgecumbe House and its grounds are now jointly owned by Cornwall and Plymouth Councils and are open to the public. St. Nicolas Island from where the first view is taken is now known as Drake's Island. Two prints on one sheet - a little foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 084
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 33cm


Dartmouth Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784
Ref: TOP 083
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
23 x 15.5cm


Blandford Forum - the principal street. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print showing the town's main street, was one of two adjacent views on one sheet. It has been remargined to the top where separated from its twin.
Ref: TOP 108
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
21.5 x 32cm


Sherborne, Northampton and Lichfield. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print shows panoramic views of 3 towns spread across the country, including the Dorset town of Sherborne. The Sherborne view is stated to have been taken from Jerusalem hill, with the town just visible in the distance. A little light foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 152
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
31 x 20cm


High Force on the River Tees. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. High Force is a waterfall on the River Tees, neat Middleton-in-Teesdale. The river forms the boundary beween Durham and North Yorkshire and the falls are impressive, especially when in full spate.
Ref: TOP 126
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
24.5 x 16.5cm


Durham Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Durham Castle is of Norman origin, and was built in the 11th century. It stands high upon a hill that is the town's citadel, facing the Cathedral and looking down upon the River Wear. Since 1840 it has been used by Durham University, who run tours for public access.
Ref: TOP 051
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
24.5 x 15.5cm


Lumley Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Lumley Castle was built in 1389 by Sir Ralph Lumley as a remodelling of his manor house. Since then it has served as the seat of the Bishop of Durham, and as accommodation for students at Durham University, but is now a luxury hotel on the outskirts of Chester-le-Street. This print has a little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 129
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
18.5 x 15.5cm


Wanstead House. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Palladian mansion of Wanstead House was built in 1715 by Sir Richard Child, whose ancestors beacame one of the richest families in England. When the male line died out in 1805 the house and vast estates were inherited by 16 year old Catherine Tylney-Long. Catherine unfortunately made a bad marriage and by 1820 her husband had squandered her fortune and run up huge debts. The house was sold in 1822 and shortly afterwards completely demolished and sold piece-meal to pay his creditors. Part of the grounds survive today as a municipal park.
Ref: TOP 128
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
19.5 x 15cm


Bristol. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print has been remargined to the top border where separated from another view on the same sheet. A little marginal foxing which would be mostly hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 112
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 33cm


Portsmouth - The Town and Harbour. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Portsmouth grew in importance as a town and a naval base from the 15th century. This print offers two views on one sheet. A little foxing which could be totally hidden by mounting within the border.
Ref: TOP 083
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
22 x 18cm


Gorhambury House. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print shows Old Gorhambury House, an Elizabethan mansion close to St. Albans. This house was replaced by a new Palladian mansion built between 1777 and 1784, after which the old house was left to decay. Its ruins are today maintained by English Heritage with free public access. The new house survives as the home of the Earl of Verulam. For ease of mounting the print is remargined to the lower border where separated from an adjoing view.
Ref: TOP 117
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
23 x 33.5cm


Gravesend and Woolwich from the Thames. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers 2 views of north Kent towns from the river. The bottom-left corner of the white margin is missing, but the print would still frame up successfully.
Ref: TOP 097
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
19.5 x 23cm


Foots Cray Place and Hayes Place. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Foots Cray Place, near Sidcup, was built in 1754 for Bourchier Cleve. The property was ravaged by fire in 1949, and demolished the following year. Hayes Place was the home of the elder and younger Pitt, who both became Prime Minister. The property was bought by Pitt the elder in 1754 and remodelled. Later owners demolished the house in 1933 for redevelopment. The print was a waterstain to the top-right border, and some marginal foxing. Both faults would be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 121
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
23 x 34.5cm


Chelsea from Battersea & the Thames at Northfleet. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers two views, both featuring the River Thames. Narrow right-hand margin.
Ref: TOP 098
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22 x 17cm


Canterbury. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Some foxing and worm holes to the margins of the print, which could be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 144
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
33 x 21cm


Lancaster. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Lancaster's origins go back to the establishment of a Roman fort on the site of its later castle.It became a borough in 1193, and was prospering at the time of this print, growing to become the country's busiest port in the 19th century. It was given city status in 1937. This print shows the River Lune in the foreground, with the town and the sea beyond. A couple of small worm holes to the lower margin and a little marginal foxing, which would be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 139
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
23 x 34.5cm


Leicester and Lincoln. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers views of two East Midlands cities. Both were important Roman towns, built on or near the sites of earlier tribal capitals. Leicester's Roman name was Ratae Coritanorum, and Lincoln's was Lindum Colonia. The 2 views could be separated and separately mounted, as indicated by the images.
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
17.5 x 31cm


Lambeth Palace & Westminster Abbey and St. Margaret's Church. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Lambeth Palace sits on the south bank of the Thames, and is the London residence of the Archbishop of London. The complex has been rebuilt and extended over the centuries, with the earliest surviving part being Lollards Tower, dating from 1435-40. The first Westminster Abbey was founded by Edward the Confessor, but the present building was begun in 1245, with work continuing until 1517. The two western towers were addded by Hawksmoor between 1722 and 1745. The Abbey has been used for all royal coronations since 1066. This print, engraved by Taylor, offers two views on one sheet. Some marginal foxing and a nick to the lower margin would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 102
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
23 x 34.5cm


Mortlake and Hammersmith from the Thames. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print is the ideal present for a fan of the University Boat Race offering views of the mid-way and finishing points of the race. Narrow right-hand margin, but enough to mount successfully. A little browning affecting the lower-right margin.
Ref: TOP 101
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
27 x 17.5cm


The Thames and the stairs at York Buildings, London. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print is taken from the spot where York House, one of the great Thameside Mansions on the Strnad once stood. The watermen's stairs known as York stairs were build to an elaboarte Italianate design around 1626, and still survive, though now located in the Embankment Gardens some way away from the river. At the time they were built York House was owned by The de Vililers family, Dukes of Buckingham. The second Duke sold the house for redevelopment in 1672, and the new buildings on the site were collectively called York Buildings. A little marginal foxing to the print would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 099
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22 x 34cm


The Bishop of London's seat at Fulham, & Lord Stormont's House, Wandsworth. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Fulham Palace was the residence of the Bishops of London from the early 8th century. In 1973 the Bishop's seat was relocated and the old palace became a museum, with its grounds now used as a botanic garden and allotments. The Lord Stormont here referred to was the 7th Viscount Stormont, David Murray. The family seat was at scone, but Murry needed a residence near London to pursue his political career, and chose this viilla on Wandsworth Hill, probably leased from Lady Rivers. He later became the Earl of Mansfield in 1793, inheriting Kenwood House. Two prints on one sheet. A little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 092
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
21.5 x 32cm


Gunnersbury House, Wanstead House, and a detail from Bethlehem Hospital. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers 3 views. Gunnersbury House was a Palladian mansion in Brentwood built sometime prior to 1742 for John Maynard. The house shown here was demolished in 1801, when the estate was sold and split into two, resulting in its replacement by 2 new houses. These still stand in Gunnersbury Park. Wanstead House was another Palladian mansion, completed 1722 for Sir Richard Child. It was demolished in 1825 when the site was sold to pay the gambling debts of the then owner William Wellesley-Pole. Bethlehem (or Bedlam) Hospital dates back to a foundation of 1347, and is Europe's oldest psychiatric hospital. At the time of this print (which shows a detail from the gateway) it occupied an impressive building in Moorfields which had opened in 1676. The hospital moved to a new site in Southwark in 1815. A little marginal worming and foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 090
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
18.5 x 32.5cm


Sion House & Kenwood House. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Syon House was built in the mid 16th century for the Duke of Somerset, being subsequently acquired by the Percy Family, Dukes of Northumberland, in1594. It continues as the family's residence today, and is open to the public. Kenwood (originally Caen Wood) House in Hampstead was built in the early 17th century, and in 1754 was acquired by William Murray, Ist Earl Mansfield, who engaged Robert Adam to remodel and add to it in the 1760's and 70's. In 1925 it was purchaed by Lord Iveagh who gave it to the nation 2 years later, and it is today administered by English Hertitage who open it to the public. Two views on one print. A light stain to the lower title.
Ref: TOP 091
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1764
£10
22.5 34cm


Kensington Palace, Ranelagh & Vauxhall Gardens. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Kensington Palace was built c1605 as a Jacobean mansion. It was bought by King William IV and Quenn Mary II in 1689, was remodelled and extended by Wren and became the main royal residence in London until 1860, since when it has been the home of junior and lesser members of the royal family. Vauxhall and Ranelaugh were London's two great "Pleasure Gardens", offering a garden walks, food and drink and a range of entertainments, including musical concerts in rotundas. They were popular venues for assignations between the sexes. Vauxhall opened to the public in c1660 and Ranelaugh in1742. Thier heyday was the 18th century, with both being closed by the mid 1800's. Both survive as garden - at least in part - as a public park in Vauxhall, and Ranelagh as the site of the Chelsea flower show. This print offers 3 views on one sheet. A little marginal foxing which could be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 088
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
23 x 34.5cm


Chelsea from Battersea & The Thames, near Northfleet. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Two "London" based views of the Thames. At the time of this print Chelsea was still a village, and would not be joined to the growing metropolis for another 60 years or so. Northfleet was of importance for its dockyards, with a number of shipyards building large vessels for commercial companies such as the East India company. A narrow right-hand margin, but sufficient for mounting.
Ref: TOP 098
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
21.5 x 17cm


The Duke of Chando's Seat at Southgate. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Duke of Chandos residence was Minchenden House in Southgate, now a London Borough, but then a village. The house was built some little time after 1664 for Sir Thomas Wolstenholme, with alterations in 1738 by a later owner, John Nicholl. Nicholl's daughter married James Bridges who subsequently became the 3rd Duke of Chandos, and the house was owned by him at the time this print was taken.. It later fell into disrepair, and was sold and demolished in 1853. This print has been re-margined to the lower border where separated from another view on the same sheet. A liitle marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 089
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1764
£7
22.5 x 34.5cm


The Churches of St Pancras and Hornsey. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print shows the Old St. Pancras Church, which probably dates back to the 11th or 12th centuries, though most of its fabric is later. It ceased to be the parish church in 1822, when replaced by the New St. Pancras church on Euston Road. It was much restored and remodelled in the mid 19th century and continues as a place of worship today. St. Mary's Chruch in the village of Hornsey (now north London) dates from the 13th century. Althougn replaced as parish church by 2 later builds, it has survived both and continues in use today. This print offers views of both churches. A little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 103
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
35.5 x 21cm


Chiswick Gardens and the Serpentine River. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The first Chiswick house was a Jacobean house built in 1610. By the 1700's the property was owned by Lord Burlington who built a new Palladian Villa, and from about 1720 developed the gardens with William Kent and other architects. Both house and gardens were modelled on Roman exemplars. The Jacobean house was demolished in 1788. The Villa and gardens have been restored in recent years and survive today under a Trust. They are administered and opened to the public by English Heritage. The gardens are free of charge.
Ref: TOP 104
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
24 x 14.5cm


The Duke of Argyll's house at Whitton. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. In 1722 Archibald Campbell, later to become the 3rd Duke of Argyll, bought 40 acres on Hounslow Heath adjoining the hamlet of Whitton. From c1732-5 he built there a Palladian Villa to a design by Roger Morris who oversaw the build. The house was known as Whitton Place and was accompanied by substantial gardens.in the late 1840's the villa was demolished and the estate was sold, much of it being developed for housing in the 20th century.
Ref: TOP 151
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22.5 x 34cm


Hampton Court & Chertsey. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Hampton Court was constructed by Cardinal Wolsey in c1514, and passed to Henry VIII on the cardinal's fall from power in 1529. Under William and Mary the palace underwent massive extension in the Baroque style between 1688 and 1694. It is today managed by "Historic Royal Palaces" and open to the public. Chertsey is a very old town which grew up around Chertsey Abbey, founded in 666 AD.It became a Thames crossing of importance, but at the time of this print was possibly most famous for its cricket team who in 1778 heavily defeated a side representing "the rest of England". A narrow right-hand margin, but sufficient to mount, thus also hiding a few marginal spots.
Ref: TOP 154
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
24 x 17cm


Norwich Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Norwich Castle was founded by William the conqueror and built from 1066-75. The keep was rebuilt in stone from 1095-1110. The castle was used as a gaol from 1220 to 1887, when it was bought by the city corporation and opened as a museum in 1895. It still serves as the city's museum and art gallery today.
Ref: TOP 081
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
21.5 x 32cm


Northampton, Lichfield and Sherborne. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print shows panoramic views of 3 towns spread across the country, including the county town of Northants. A little light foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 152
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
23 x 35.5cm


Castle Ashby & Sponne Gate, Coventry & East Gate, Chester. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print offers 3 views. Castle Ashby is the ancestral home of the Compton family, built on lands given to the family in 1512. In 1574 Lord Compton demolished the old 13th century castle on the estate to build the present house, still standing today and occupied by the present Earl Compton. The gardens and grounds were, in part, designed by Lancelot "Capability" Brown, and are open to the public. Spon gate was one of the 12 gates in Coventry's defensive walls, constructed in the 14th century. It was demolished in the late 18th century. Chester's East gate, stands on the site of one of the 4 original gates into the Roman Legionary Fortress which occupied the site. The present gate was built in 1768, with its clock added in 1899. The print has narrow vertical margins and a nick to the upper-left border, but would mount-up successfully.
Ref: TOP 153
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
19 x 12.5cm


Blenheim Palace, Woodstock. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The construction of Blenheim Palace began in 1705, on land gifted to John Churchil, Duke of Marlborough, by a grateful nation in recognition of his victory at the Battle of Blenheim during the War of the Spanish Succession. Parliament voted funding for the build to which the Duke also contributed. The architect was Sir John Vanburgh and the house was mostly completed by 1725, in the English Baroque style. Quarrels between the Royal House household and the Marlboroughs, and between the Dutchess and the Architect contributed to the delay, causing disruptions to the flow of funding. The house remains the seats of the Dukes of Marlborough today, and is open to the public. This print has been remargined to the top border, where separated from an adjoining view.
Ref: TOP 120
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
19.5 x 16.5cm


The City of Bath. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Bath was a well known spa town in Roman times, and the original Roman baths still survive. It regained its reputation as a Spa resort in the late 17th century, and was further developed as such by the Georgians, with many of the city's iconic building being constructed in the 18th century, giving Bath an architectural integrity which justifies its status as a World Heritage Site. This print has been remargined to the lower border, where separated from an adjoining view on the same page. A little marginal foxing, which would be mostly hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 111
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22 x 37.5cm


Two views of Shugborough House . The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Shugborough Estate was originally owned by the Bishops of Lichfield, but passed into private hands after the dissolution of the monasteries. In 1624 it was acquired by William Anson, whose grandson, in 1693, demolished the old manor house and replaced it with a new 3 story house which forms the core of today's mansion. Shugborough Hall was extended with the addition of pavillions in the 1740's. The house remained in the Anson family (later Earls of Lichfield) until 1960, when it was passed to the National Trust who open it to the public. This print offers 2 views on 1 page. Some foxing to the (narrow) margins which could be mostly hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 146
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
21.5 x 32cm


Lichfield, Northampton & Sherborne. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print shows panoramic views of 3 towns spread across the country, including the Staffordshire cathedral city of Lichfield. A little light foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 152
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
17.5 x 31cm


Lambeth Palace & Westminster Abbey and St. Margaret's Church. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Lambeth Palace sits on the south bank of the Thames, and is the London residence of the Archbishop of London. The complex has been rebuilt and extended over the centuries, with the earliest surviving part being Lollards Tower, dating from 1435-40. The first Westminster Abbey was founded by Edward the Confessor, but the present building was begun in 1245, with work continuing until 1517. The two western towers were addded by Hawksmoor between 1722 and 1745. The Abbey has been used for all royal coronations since 1066. This print, engraved by Taylor, offers two views on one sheet. Some marginal foxing and a nick to the lower margin would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 102
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
23.5 x 35cm


Dulwich College, and Camberwell from the Grove. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Dulwich College is an independent, public school, founded in1619 by the Elizabethan actor, Edward Allen. It originally offered schooling for "twelve poor scholars", today risen to 1,500 rather less poor ones. At the time of this print Camberwell was still a rural village, but development had already begun along the street known as The Grove, and today the area's elegant Georgian houses have "Conservation Area" status. The print has a narrow right hand margin, but sufficient to mount.
Ref: TOP 095
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£9
23.5 x 35cm


Addington Place, Croydon, & The Royal Circus, St. George's Fields. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Addington Place is a Palladian mansion built in the early 1770's by the Trecothic family. From 1807-1930 it was owned by the Church and used as a London residence by the Archbishops of Canterbury when its name changed from "Place" to "Palace". It is today again in private hands and run as a country club, conference and banqueting centre, and wedding venue. The Royal Circus opened on Blackfriars Road in 1782 and put on equine and canine dramas. It burnt down in 1799 and again in 1805, after which it was rebuilt as the Surrey Theatre. It was finally demolished in 1934. The Obelisk shown in the print was erected in 1771 in honour of Brass Crosby, Mayor of London. It still stands today, but the open space of St. George's Fields succumbed to development from 1780. The print has a little light marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 094
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
20.5 x 34cm


The seat of Admiral Keppel, Bagshot & the seat of David Garrick, Hampton. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Crown estate of Bagshot Park, was once a royal hunting park, and a house, known as Bagshot Park Lodge, was built there in1631-33 for the use of King Charles I. It was remodelled in 1766-72, apparently for occupation by George Keppel, Earl of Albermarle, but upon his death in 1772, it would appear to have been offered to his brother Augustus, Vice Admiral Keppel. This house was demolished in 1878, but the Park remains the home of royalty today. David Garrick was a prominent Georgian actor and theatrical manager. He moved to what was then called Hampton House in1754, first renting then purchasing and improving the property. The Adam bothers remodelled the house and Capability Brown assisted in the design of the gardens, which are notable for the Temple of Shakespeare, which still stands on the banks of the Thames, and is visible in this view. The house, today called Garrick's Villa, was converted into appartments in 1923. This print offers 2 views on one sheet. A little foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 125
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller c1787-9
£9
22 x 34.5cm


Wandsworth & the Thames, Clapham from the Common. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers two views of what were then still rural retreats for those wishing to escape the hubbub of the busy City of London - a far cry from today's London Boroughs. Some foxing the the right-hand margin and decorative border, but could be hidden by mounting within the border.
Ref: TOP 093
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22 x 34cm


The Bishop of London's seat at Fulham, & Lord Stormont's House, Wandsworth. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Fulham Palace was the residence of the Bishops of London from the early 8th century. In 1973 the Bishop's seat was relocated and the old palace became a museum, with its grounds now used as a botanic garden and allotments. The Lord Stormont here referred to was the 7th Viscount Stormont, David Murray. The family seat was at scone, but Murry needed a residence near London to pursue his political career, and chose this viilla on Wandsworth Hill, probably leased from Lady Rivers. He later became the Earl of Mansfield in 1793, inheriting Kenwood House. Two prints on one sheet. A little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 092
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
21.5 x 36cm


Guildford & Birmingham. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Guildford's roots go back to Saxon times when it was an important centre housing a mint. A Norman castle was added around 1090, and an impressive 14th century guildhall is still extant. The town prospered, particularly from 1693 when the Wey Navigation opened, making Guildford the hub of an important waterway network. In the 20th century it also became a Bishop's seat and a University town, and is today the county town of Surrey. This print offers views of Guildford and Birmingham, but the views could be separated for separate framing. A little foxing to the top border and the margins.
Ref: TOP 086
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22.5 x 34cm


Hampton Court & Chertsey. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Hampton Court was constructed by Cardinal Wolsey in c1514, and passed to Henry VIII on the cardinal's fall from power in 1529. Under William and Mary the palace underwent massive extension in the Baroque style between 1688 and 1694. It is today managed by "Historic Royal Palaces" and open to the public. Chertsey is a very old town which grew up around Chertsey Abbey, founded in 666 AD.It became a Thames crossing of importance, but at the time of this print was possibly most famous for its cricket team who in 1778 heavily defeated a side representing "the rest of England". A narrow right-hand margin, but sufficient to mount, thus also hiding a few marginal spots.
Ref: TOP 154
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
18 x 32.5cm


Guildford Castle & The Castle's Ancient Crypt. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Guildford Castle is of Norman foundation, probably dating from shortly after 1086, and added to over the years.It was a royal residence until 1611 when it passed into private hands. It has been owned by Guildford Corporation since 1885. The grounds are today public gardens, the gatehouse a museum, and the keep has been restored as a visitor centre. This print, engraved by Hawkins, offers 2 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 370
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 23.5cm


Brighton from the sea & Chichester. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Brighton (or Brighthelmstone as it was once called), was a small settlement at the time of Domesday Book, and remained a fishing village until its development in the 18th and 19th centuries into a fashionable seaside resort.This was helped by its patronage by the Prince Regent, the future George IV, who first visited in 1783, and later built his Royal Pavillion there in the 1820's. Chichester was an important Roman town, which became a Bishop's seat in 1075, and its cathedral - shown in this print - dates from that time. This print has a narrow righ-hand margin, but sufficient for mounting.
Ref: TOP 123
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
21.5 x 34.5cm


Arundel Castle & Lord George Lenox's seat at West Stoke. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The construction of Arundel Castle was begun in 1067 by Roger de Montgomery. It guards the Arun gap through the South Downs, and has been owned by the Howard family, Dukes of Norfolk, since 1557. In the 18th and 19th centuries it was remodelled as a comfortable stately home, and is today open to the public. Lord George Lennox made his reputation as a soldier, but was also an MP, representing the constituencies of Chichester, and later Sussex betwenn 1761 and 1790. His house at West Stoke, 4 miles from Chichester, still survives as a private residence.The print has a few spots to the margins, which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 124
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
23 x 35.5cm


Sponne Gate, Coventry & East Gate, Chester & Castle Ashby. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Castle Ashby is the ancestral home of the Compton family, built on lands given to the family in 1512. In 1574 Lord Compton demolished the old 13th century castle on the estate to build the present house, still standing today and occupied by the present Earl Compton. The gardens and grounds were, in part, designed by Lancelot "Capability" Brown, and are open to the public. Spon gate was one of the 12 gates in Coventry's defensive walls, constructed in the 14th century. It was demolished in the late 18th century. Chester's East gate, stands on the site of one of the 4 original gates into the Roman Legionary Fortress which occupied the site. The present gate was built in 1768, with its clock added in 1899. The print has narrow vertical margins and a nick to the upper-left border, but would mount-up successfully.
Ref: TOP 153
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
21.5 x 16.5cm


Greyfriars Gate and Church, Coventry. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Greyfriars Church was the monastic church of a Franciscan house, first recorded in 1234. Its tower and spire alone survived the dissolution of the monasteries, being incorporated into a new church built in the 1820's. This was largely destroyed by World War II bombing, but again the tower survived, Nearby once stood Greyfriars gate, one of the 12 gates built in the second half of the 14th century as part of the city's defences. Greyfriars gate was erected in1384 on the Warwick road It was demolished in 1781. The print is remargined to the top border where separated from an adjoining view.
Ref: TOP 118
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
24.5 x 16cm


Maxstoke Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Maxstoke Castle, about 3 miles from Coleshill, was built by Sir William de Clinton shortly after 1345. Since the 17th century it has been the family home of the Fetherstone-Dikes family, which it remains today. It is open to the general public for a short period each year (usually June), and for pre-booked tours.
Ref: TOP 105
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
21.5 x 36cm


Birmingham (and Guildford). The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers views of both Bormingham and Guildford, but these could be separated for individual mounting if so required. At the time the print was taken, Birmingham was at the forefront of the industrial revolution, having grown from a midlle-sized market town to a major manufacturing centre over the course of the 18th century. It is today Great Britain's second largest city.
Ref: TOP 086
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
23.5 x 16.5cm


Appleby Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Appleby Castle was founded by Ranulph de Meschines in c1170. From 1269 until 1653 it was the home of the powerful Clifford family, before its conversion to a more comforatble mansion by its next owner the Earl of Thanet. Since then a new wing has been added and further updatings have occurred. Itis today a private residence, but pre-booked, private tours can be arranged.
Ref: TOP 140
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
17.5 x 30.5cm


Derwentwater, Broad Water and Windermere. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print offers views of 3 Cumbrian lakes. At the time it was taken the English Lake District was just beginning to find a wider audience for its picuresque beauty. Broad Water was the old name applied to two of the lakes - Bassenthwaite and Brothers Water. As this view of Broadwater is designated as in Westmorland it relates to the latter of the two.
Ref: TOP 116
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
16 x 15cm


Salisbury. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Modern Salisbury originated from the removal of the bishop's seat from nearby Old Sarum, to a new site to the south. The new cathedral, built in the Earley English Gothic style, was begun in 1220 and mostly complete by 1280. The town grew up around it, receiving its royal charter and city status in 1227. It is notable for having the tallest spire of any British cathedral, and by the 14th century had grown to be the largest settlement in Wiltshire. The print has some worm holes and foxing to the margins, which could be hidden by judicious mounting as per our image.
Ref: TOP 143
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
19.5 x 14cm


Scarborough. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Scarborough is rumoured to have been founded by a Viking raider, Thorgils Skarthi, no early evidence survives to support this legend. The town does, though, boast a Norman Castle dating from the 11th century, and by 1155 it was of sufficient importance to receive a charter from King Henry II, allowing it to hold markets. The popular song "Are you going to Scarborough Fair" has passed in musical history. In 1626 a mineral spring was discovered there, which gave rise to the construction and growth of Scarborough Spa, and visitors flocked to take the waters and partake in sea bathing. The town remains an important seaside resort today.
Ref: TOP 107
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
31.5 x 20cm


High Force on the River Tees. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Although un-named as such, this print shows the waterfall of High Force on the upper reaches of the River Tees, which forms the border between the North Riding of Yorkshire and Durham. Although impressive, its fall of 71 feet does not place it amongst Britain's highest waterfalls.
Ref: TOP 126
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
18.5 x 16.5cm


Wentworth House. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. in 1725 Thomas Watson-Wentworth, Ist Marquess of Rockingham began a new house on his estate to replace the old Jacobean brick house he had inherited. The new house was built in the English Baroque style, but before its completion, a new even larger east wing was begun, this time in the Palladian style. The finished result was two back to back mansions, joined as one huge house. The second Marquess (twice later Prime Minister of Whig goverments) continued to extend the house when he inherited in 1750, but after his death the house passed to the Fitzwilliam family. The family fell on hard times in the 20th century, when the estate and grounds were desecrated by coal mining, and death duties resulted in the sale of much of the house's contents. The family sold the house in 1989, since when it has had 2 private owners, but its future remains uncertain and it was recently Nov. 2014) reported to be again on the market.
Ref: TOP 127
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
17 x 30.5cm


West Cowes Castle & Carisbrooke Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. West Cowes Castle is one of 2 forts built by Henry VIII in 1539 to guard the mouth of the River Medina. In 1716 the fort was remodelled for residential use, and further adapted in 1856-8 as the Club House for the Royal Yacht Squadron, which it remains today. Carisbrooke Castle existed by 1100 when it was in the possession of Richard de Redvers, but forts existed on the site in both Roman and Saxon times. The castle was purchased by King Edward I in 1293, since when it has been a crown property controlled by a Warden. King Charles 1 was imprisoned there in 1648/9 prior to his trial and execution, and in more recent times it was home to Queen Victoria's daughter, Princess Beatrice from 1896-1944. It is today maintained by English Heritage who open it to the public. This print offers 2 views on 1 sheet, which could be separated for individual mounting if desired. A little marginal foxing would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 147
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22 x 16.5cm


Jersey - St. Hilary. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. St. Hilary is one of the 12 parishes of Jersey, and covers the majority of St. Helier, the islands largest town, which was once known by the parish name. The origins of the two alternative spellings are somewhat confused. One suggestion is that St. Helier was a martyred hermit living on the island in the first millenium, and his name was corrupted to "St. Hilary". An alternative version suggests a linkage with St. Hilary, Bishop of Poitiers, with the parish church being dedicated in his honour. The corruption of the names would then be in the reverse order. This print shows a view of the town from the sea, and was probably taken from Elizabeth Castle, which lies on an offshore islet in the bay. A little marginal foxing, which could be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 106
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
17.5 x 15cm


Peele Castle, Isle of Man. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Peel Castle stands on St. Patrick's Isle which has a causeway connection to the town of Peel.The first structure on the island was the Celtic monastery of St. Patrick, built sometime in the 10th century. Magnus Barefoot, King of Mann is believed to have built the first castle in the 11th century, incorporating part of the monastery, notably the surviving round tower. Most of the other extant castle remains date from the early 14th century. Within the castle precinct are the ruins of the cathedral of St. German, built in stages between the 12th and 14th centuries, but later abandoned to decay from the 18th century. The site is today maintained by Manx National Heritage and open to the public. This print has a little light foxing to the margins, which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 148
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
17 x 15.5cm


Anglesey - The Collegiate Church of Holyhead. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Holyhead's Collegiate Church was built between the 13th and 16th centuries. It was originally a monastic foundation, constructed within the site of an old Roman fort. As a "collegiate" church its worship was administered by a body of "secular" canons, and it served as the parish church of the community. In 1547 an Act of Parliament abolished collegiate foundations, but the church survived and continued as the local parish church dedicated to St. Cybi. This print was engraved by Roberts.
Ref: TOP 149
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
34.5 x 22.5cm


Pembrokeshire - The Castle and Bridge of Haverford West. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. According to most sources the Castle at Haverforwest was founded by Gilbert de Clare in 1120. In 1213 it passed to William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke (who did much to strengthen the fortifications, then in 1248 to the de Bohun family, who in turn sold it in 1288 to Queen Eleanor of Castille, wife of King Edward I. The Queen undertook major reconstruction, but her work was undone when the castle was slighted and abandoned after the civil war. It was, however, re-modelled as a prison from 1779 to 1878, and subsequently as a police station, and council offices. Today it is administered and opened to the public by the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority. The bridge in the view was built in 1726 to replace the old ford across the River Cleddau. The print has some light discolouration and a couple of wormholes to the lower margin, which would be mostly hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 137
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
33.5 x 22cm


Aberdeen. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Aberdeen has been an important centre since the 12th century when it received its Royal Burgh status from King David I. Its trade rosperd and it later bacame the site of one of the country's oldest universities in 1495. By the time this print was taken its economy rested mainly upon fishing, paper-making, textiles and ship building. The town suffered at the hands of both parties during the 14th century wars of independence, but recovered, and was subsequently strongly fortified, only to be plundered by both sides in the in 1640's wars of the 3 kingdoms (the civil war). Today it is Scotland's 3rd largest city, with a booming oil-based economy. This print has a small area of worm damage, just impinging the bottom-left hand corner.
Ref: TOP 130
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£9
25.5 x 32.5cm


Montrose in Angus and Channery in Ross-shire. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784
Ref: TOP 135
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
34 x 21.5cm


Inverness. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Inverness stands at the north-eastern end of the Great Glen, beyond which the River Ness meets the sea. A Pictish settlement existed on the site from the 6th century, and the town received its first charter from King David I in the 12th century. Inverness has survived many troubles - raids from the Lords of the Isles, the campaings of the the English during the wars of Independence, and the Jacobite uprisings, culminating the nearby Battle of Culloden. Today it is regarded as the capital of the Highlands, and is regularly voted as one of the most pleasant places to live in the country. This print has a small worm-hole in the lower margin (just to the left of the title on the image.)
Ref: TOP 134
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
35 x 23cm


Perthshire - The Town of Perth. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Situated on the River Tay, Perth is a relatively modern name for the town, which until the mid 17th century was known as St. Johnstoun, the parish church being dedicated to John the Baptist. It was created a Royal Burgh in the 12th century, from which time the Kings of Scotland also came to be crowned at nearby Scone Abbey. The town was always a centre for trade, both locally and internationally, and around the time of this print was known for its linen, leather, bleach and distilling industries. A small area of worm damage to the bottom-left corner of the print, but would still mount-up successfully.
Ref: TOP 131