Copperplate

British Isles & England & Wales : 31 items
G. Mercator    Atlas 1595
£695
46.5 x 35cm


England & Wales, also showing parts of the continental and Irish coasts. Original colour. Repair to bottom centrefold, but otherwise an excellent example of this decorative map. Mercator's Atlas (the first time the word was used to describe a volume of maps) was published in 3 parts beginning in 1585. The third and final part included maps of the British Isles for the first time, and was published by his son Rumold in 1595, the year after Mercator died.
Ref: BIS 880
 
G. Mercator    Atlas 1595
£895
41 x 32.5cm


The British Isles, also showing part of the continental coasts. Original colour in very good condition. Mercator's Atlas (the first time the word was used to describe a volume of maps) was published in 3 parts beginning in 1585. The third and final part included maps of the British Isles for the first time, and was published by his son Rumold in 1595, the year after Mercator died.
Ref: BIS 881
 
W. Blaeu    Tooneel des Aerdrycks, oft Nieuwe Atlas 1647-64 (1634)
£420
50 x 38.5cm


England & Wales. The Blaeu family were one of the leading Dutch map producers of the 17th century. Their major work was a multi volume world atlas initiated by Willem Blaeu and expanded by his son Joan. Their maps were beautifully designed and engraved, and are often found with original colour, making them most desirable to collectors. This map was first published in 1634 in W. Blaeu's Atlas Novus and continued to appear in later editions of the expanded Atlas (the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum and the Atlas Maior). The Dutch text to the verso dates this to the editions of 1647, 1648 or 1664. Original colour. Short repaired tear to bottom centrefold, well outside the printed area.
Ref: BIS 885
 
J. Jansson    Atlas Novus 1646-56 (1646)
£330
54.5 x 43cm


The British Isles, with original colour. Some offsetting, and a vertical crease. Centrefold repaired (within printed area at bottom), and a couple of other repaired marginal tears outside the printed area, but still an attractive map. French text to the verso dates this example as from the editions of 1646, 1647, 1652 or 1656
Ref: BIS 886
 
J. Jansson P. van den Keere    Novus Atlas 1646-62 (1636)
£695
51 x 39cm


This map, engraved for Jan Jansson by Peter van den Keere, was based on an earlier version issued by Ortelius in his Parergon in 1595. It shows the British Isles in Roman Times. Jansson first published it in his world atlas in 163 . In 1646 3 compass roses with rhumb lines were added to the plate, this example having these revisions. The revised map then appeared in volume 4 of the atlas which covered England and Wales Original colour. No text to verso.
Ref: BIS 015
 
P. Schenk    Published separately and in various Schenk atlases. 1706 (c1690)
£480
48 x 56.5cm


The British Isles, with an inset map covering the Orkneys, Shetlands and Faro Islands. Original colour. Short repaired tear to left hand centrefold, just touching the printed border. A couple of small holes outside the printed area.
Ref: BIS 893
 
Homann    Various Homann Heirs Atlases 1729
£365
56 x 48cm


The British Isles with an inset map of the Orkneys and Shetlands, and also showing part of the near continent. Original full wash colour, and in good condition. Johann Homann and his successors revived German map making in the 18th century. Homann himself died in 1724, and the business was run first by his son, and then in c 1730 was bequeathed to his son's heirs with the proviso that they trade under the name of Homann Heirs. This map was prepared by Homann's son, Johann Christophe, after his father's death, and bears the Homann Heirs imprint. It was used in various of the firm's atlases. This example is in state 2 as described by R. Shirley.
Ref: BIS 894
 
J. Janvier    Atlas Moderne c1762
£135
44.5 x 31cm


The British Isles, with an inset map of the Orkneys and Shetlands, in original outline colour. This map first appeared in the Atlas Moderne in 1762, and was re-issued in several later editions.
Ref: BIS 019
 
J. Bellin    Essai Geographique Sur Les Isles Britanniques 1757
£55
14 x 20cm


The British Isles. Outline colour and a faint wash.
Ref: BIS 896
 
J. Blair    Blair's Tables of Chronology 1768
£150
56 x 2cm


An uncoloured map of the British Isles, with part of the French and Dutch coasts, and an inset of the Orkneys and Shetlands. The map was published to accompany Blair's Tables of Chronology, and has 2 vertical folds from its inclusion in this volume. Possibly engraved by T.Kitchin.
Ref: BIS 898
 
R. de Vaugondy    Atlas Universel? c1757?
£150
53 x 48.5cm


A map of the British Isles in Roman times. Original outline colour. Some very light offsetting from the decorative cartouche, but otherwise in good condition. The map is based on earlier material by Sanson to whom the Robert de Vaugondy family were related. This map is by Didier Robert de Vaugondy, son of Gilles who is often referred to on maps simply as Sieur Robert.
Ref: BIS 901
 
von Reilly    Publication not known. 1789
£50
21 x 28cm


England and Wales, coloured with a very pale pink wash. An odd map with the cartouche at right angles to the general orientation
Ref: BIS 902
 
R. de Vaugondy    Nouvel Atlas Portatif? 1784 (1762)
£60
22 x 23.5cm


England and Wales. Original outline colour.
Ref: BIS 903
 
J. Aiken    England Delineated 1790
£25
19 x 17cm


A folding map of England and Wales. John Aikin (or Aiken) wrote this topographical work for children in order "to make my young countrymen better acquainted than they are usually found to be with their native land". The first edition of 1788 did not include county maps, but these were added for the second edition of 1790, from which this example comes. The work was published by Joseph Johnson, but the maps are unsigned. There were four later editions of the book with the maps, and one without. The map is fairly simple, befitting the needs of its target audience. A few marks around the margins, and some offsetting where folded.
Ref: BIS 904
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£30
21.5 x 26cm


England and Wales. The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: BIS 905
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£20
24 x 34.5cm


Roman Britain. Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. Maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806. A few spots.
Ref: BIS 972
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£20
23 x 31cm


Saxon England. Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. Maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806.
Ref: BIS 973
 
C. Smith    New English Atlas 1808 (1804)
£70
45 x 55.5cm


England and Wales. Charles Smith was a successful London publisher and map-seller, whose work is stylistically very similar to that of John Cary. His large format New English Atlas first came to market in 1804, but many of the maps have also been found in folding format and may have been sold individually before the publication of the atlas. Smith's maps were well designed and accurate, making use of the large scale county surveys of the previous half-century. The atlas was a commercial success and was up-dated and re-published regularly until c1865 (the latter editions produced by lithographic transfer). This example is from the 1808 second edition, and is in bright and original full colour. Repairs to centrefold tears, but outside the printed area.
Ref: BIS 907
 
J. Barclay    Barclay's Universal English Dictionary 1852 (1836)
£30
20.5 x 26cm


England and Wales.Uncoloured. Close trimmed as usual with this edition.
Ref: BIS 911
 
Vuillemin    Atlas Migeon 1874
£45
27.5 x 37.5cm


The British Isles, with an inset of the Shetlands, in original full was colour. 2 vignettes - the tower of London and the Thames tunnel. The names of London and Southampton have been underlined in pen, but not too obtrusively. Otherwise an attractive map.
Ref: BIS 912
 
J. Duncan    A Complete County Atlas of England and Wales 1840-45 (1825)
£45
35 x 42.5cm


England and Wales. Coloured. These maps were first published in 1825, and probably sold singly. In 1833 they were re-published by James Duncan in a thematic atlas to illustrate the representative changes brought about by the 1832 Reform Act. There were later re-issues in 1840 and 1845 with the addition of railways, and this map dates from one of these editions.
Ref: BIS 1127
 
G. Le Rouge    Atlas General 1745
£260
47.5 x 56cm


England and Wales with original outline colour, and in good condition. The map shows divisions into counties and also shows the allocations of counties to 5 provinces.
Ref: BIS 1143
 
M. Seutter    Atlas Geographicus/Atlas Novus 1734-56 (1720)
£550
48 x 56cm


The British Isles. This map first appeared in the Atlas Geographicus of 1720, and was later used in Seutter's Atlas Novus from 1730. According to Shirley this example must date from after 1733, as the added words "Sac. Caes. M. Geogr." indicate Seutter's appointment as Geographer to the Emperor which occured at this time. Original wash colour. Framed.
Ref: BIS 1199
 
Homann    Atlas Novus Terrarum c1715 (1707)
£350
55.5 x 47.5cm


The British Isles. This map first appeared in the Atlas Novus Terrarum in c.1707, but with a portrait of Queen Anne. The portrait was changed when George I came to the throne in 1714 (this example being R. Shirley's state 4 of plate1). Original wash colour.
Ref: BIS 1200
 
J. Walker    British Atlas 1854-6 (1837)
£15
32 x 38cm


England and Wales. The Walker's British Atlas was first issued in 1837, and ran to many subsequent editions with frequent updates to railways and other information. This example is from the editions of 1854 or 1856 - so dated from the railways shown, the publisher's imprint, and the population figures quoted. Full wash colour. Short repairs to both sides of the lateral centrefold.
Ref: BIS 1201
 
B. Clarke    The British Gazetteer 1852
£25
41 x 52cm


England and Wales, with part of Scotland.The map is designed to show the country's railway network, and was produced by lithographic transfer for Clarke's British Gazetteer, published in 1852 by H.G. Collins. Folded and trimmed close to bottom right hand border to fit the volume. Repaired tear c 2 cm within the bottom border.
Ref: BIS 1202
 
P.F. Tardieu    Source publication not known 1806?
£35
42.5 x 32cm


The British Isles, with part of the French coast. The map shows basic physical features, but only a few place names.
Ref: BIS 1226
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806
£45
47.5 x 36cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. This map of the British Isles shows the judges circuits and accompanies a distance chart showing mileages between the main cities and shire towns. It is from the second Gough edition of Britannia published in 1806.It bears the date 1805 and the signature of Stockdale as publisher, but no others, and is tentatively assumed to be by Cary.
Ref: BIS 010
 
W.& A.K. Johnston    The Victoria Regina Atlas 1897
£15
26 x 19.5cm


From the Johnstons' World Atlas, published in 1897 and named in celebration of Queen Victoria's 60th Jublee that year. The maps are printed in colour, and on both sides of the page, this map of England and Wales having a map of the county of Yorkshire to the verso (see YOR 015).
Ref: BIS 014
 
A. Gross Geographia    Geographia General Reference Map of England and Wales c1911-20
£20
93 x 120cm


England and Wales. Alexander Gross was a Hungarian émigré who arrived in Britain in 1911 and founded the map publishing company Geographia. This folding map is linen-backed but not dissected, and is contained in hard covers It comes with a separate index booklet of place-names. A little wear along some of the folds.
Ref: BIS 003
 
T. Murray    An Atlas of the English Counties 1830
£10
71 x 88cm


The title page of Murray's county atlas states that the maps were "Projected on the basis of the Trigonometrical Survey by order of the hon.ble The Board of Ordnance, under the superindendance of T.L. Murray". This might seem to imply the project had at least the official blessing, if not the active involvement of the Ordnance Survey, but is more likely to be a marketing puff. D. Hodson has suggested that the maps were copied from those of William Ebden published from 1825-8, both sets also being engraved by the same firm of Hoare & Reeves. Murray's Atlas was first published in 1830, with second and third editions in 1831 and 1832, the latter with the adddition of electoral data. by 1838 the plates had been acquired by W. Robson & Co. who published and sold the maps individually, and also used them in their commercial directories. This example, one of the large, folding, general maps at the beginning of the volume, is from the first edition of 1830. Unlike all of the other maps, it is uncoloured. There are some repairs to folds along the central vertical and horizontal fold line.
Ref: BIS 018