Copperplate

Regional Maps of the UK : 30 items
N. Sanson    Publication not known. 1778 (1654)
£190
57.5 x 36cm


Midlands/E.Anglia. A map of the area once contained within the Anglo-Saxon kindoms of Mercia and East Anglia. The first state of this map was dated 1654, and it was included in Sanson's most important work,- Cartes Generales de Toutes les Parties du Monde.This is a later re-issue by the Paris publisher Fortin, dated 1778. The map is attractively decorated with full wash colour, possibly original.
 
M. Leigh    Leigh's New Map of the Environs of London c1834-40
£60
28 x 20.5cm


London Environs. A relatively small pocket-sized map of the environs of London, dissected, linen-backed and folding into thin card covers. The scale is approx 4 miles to the inch, covering an area approx 16-20 miles from the city centre, including Windsor to the west, St. Albans to the north, Billericay to the east and Sevenoaks to the south. The map was presumably sold as a single item, possibly in a slip case. Not listed in Howgego.
 
T. Moule    The English Counties Delineated 1837-39
£10
20 x 25.5cm


East Anglia and South-East England. One of the 4 Regional maps on Inland Navigation included in Moule's county atlas. It is engraved by John Dower and shows the rivers and canals. Uncoloured.
 
Anon.    Colton's General Atlas 1859 (1855)
£135
40 x 32.5cm


London Environs. In 1831 Joseph Hutchins Colton set up a publishing company in New York, which grew to be one of the leading US map publishers of the 19th century. After producing a number of individaul maps, Colton's first atlas was issued in 1855, initially titled Colton's Atlas of the World, but changed to Colton's General Atlas from 1857. There were a number of editions up until 1888. This map of the Environs of London - the first London map to be published in the USA - is from the 1859 edition of the work. Around this time Colton seems to have entered into a collaborative venture with with the book seller and publishers Johnson and Browning, who are credited as publishers of the 1859 edition of Colton's atlas. In return, Colton was credited as the publisher of the first 2 editions of Johnson's Family Atlas published in 1860 and 1861. Collaboration subsequently turned into competition.
 
T. Moule    Barclays Universal English Dictionary 1842 (1837)
£37
26.5 x 20.5cm


Bath and Bristol Environs. This map first appeared in Moule's English Counties Delineated, published in atlas form in 1837. It was subsequently re-issued in some editions of Barclays Universal English Dictionary, this example being from an 1842 edition of the latter. Some slight discoloration to the top margin. Mounted
 
A. Dury C. Bowles    Bowles Environs of London, Taken from Actual Surveys 1775 (1771)
£395
84.5 x 63.5cm


London Environs. This map was, as the title suggests, was based on actual survey work by Andrew Dury, and jointly published by Dury and Carington Bowles in 1771. It was then titled as "Bowles and Dury's Environs of London…", but for the second edition of 1775 Dury must have sold his rights in the venture as his name was dropped from the title and publisher's imprint. There was a third and final edition of the map in c1785. The scale is half an inch to the mile, and the extent of its coverage includes Luton, Canvey Island, Bletchingley and Marlow, some 30 miles out from central London. This example is the second edition of 1775, and is dissected into 32 , linen-backed segments, folding into a (slightly tatty) slip case. The colouring is original. The map is listed as no. 154 in Darlington & Howgego's "Printed Maps of London".
 
J. Cary    A New Map of England and Wales with Part of Scotland 1794
£30
20.5 x 26.5cm


Western Durham and parts of surrounding counties. This bound work comprised 81 contiguous map sheets, together with an index sheet. It covered all of England and Wales plus the southern half of Scotland. This is sheet 59 which includes the western two-thirds of Durham, and parts of Yorkshire, Westmorland and Northumberland. This copy is dated 1794, and is thus a first edition, in original outline colour. There were several later, updated editions.
 
E. Weller    The Dispatch Atlas 1863
£25
31. 5 x 43.5cm


The Great Northern Railway. First published in 1862 as one of a series of maps in the Weekly Dispatch newspaper, this railway map was re-issued in The Dispatch Atlas of 1863 from which this example comes. Nine maps on 2 mapsheets only of the 3 that would have described the GNR's complete network (missing the southern section from London to Nottingham) .
 
G. Cruchley J. Cary    Lennox's 40 Miles Round Leeds c1865
£295
125.5 x 98cm


This map has it's origins in the 1820's, when John Cary and his sons first published Cary's Improved Map of England and Wales, a set of 65 sectional maps covering England and Wales at the scale of 2 miles to the inch. The Carys may have followed OS maps where available, but for the northern half of the country especially they had to rely on their own and others' detailed survey work. In 1844 George Cruchley purchased the Carys' stock of printing plates, and, after changing titles and imprints, continued to issue his own maps and atlases from these plates, including this series. Cruchley's only significant amendment was the addition of the railways, and the maps must have been frequently updated to show the fast growing railway network. A switch to printing from lithographic transfers rather than the original copper plates would have made this somewhat easier. Cruchley sold the maps individually under the title "Reduced Ordnance Map of England and Wales", but was also happy to adapt the series to other commercial opportunities, as with this example. The map is actually composed of 4 "Cary" sheets - numbers 43,44,48 and 49, still using the original Cary numbering. The coverage encompasses Kirkby Lonsdale, Hunmanby, Lincoln, and Middlewich - I'e the west Riding of Yorks. with parts of the North and East Ridings and of Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Cheshire and Lancashre. Cruchley's name does not appear on the map, but a pasted-on printed label at the centre top gives the title "Map of 40 Miles Round Leeds" and the name of John Lennox, 40 Commercial Street, Leeds. Lennox was a wholesale and retail stationer and printer, and presumably approached Cruchley to provide him with this specially adapted map for local sale. It is dissected into 32 linen-backed segments, folding into boards covered in black leather, gilt, and is in attractive original hand-colouring. There is no date, and although I have seen other examples attributed to 1865, it could be earlier.
 
B.R. Davies    S.D.U.K. 1836
£25
38.5 x 30cm


Edinburgh Environs. The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (SDUK), produced a number of works to capitalise upon the growing Victorian trend for education and self-improvement. These included a number of maps, plans and topographical books and partworks. This map of the southern environs of Edinburgh was engraved by Benjamin Rees Davies and published in 1836.
 
J. Aiken    A Description of the Country from Thirty to Forty Miles Round Manchester 1795
£235
83 x 77cm


The Environs of Manchester. John Aikin (or Aiken) was a doctor who also pursued literary interests, and produced this work in his fifties. The volume contained several maps including this large folding map at a scale of 1/2inch to the mile. The map is centred on Manchester and covers most of Cheshire, the southern half of Lancashire, the Derbyshire Peak District, and the south-west corner of Yorkshire. There is no attribution to cartographer or engraver on the map, but John Cary is a fair bet (stylistically and because he provided the town plan of Manchester included in the work). Slight wear along one of the fold lines with a couple of small holes where folds meet, but otherwise in nice, clean condition.
 
T. Moule    Barclay's Universal English Dictionary 1848 (1837)
£55
21 x 16.5cm


London Environs . This map first appeared in Moule's English Counties Delineated, published in atlas form in 1837. It was subsequently re-issued in some editions of Barclays Universal English Dictionary, this example being from an 1848 edition of the latter. Mounted
 
G. Bacon    Bacon's New Survey map of Somerset, Dorset and part of Wiltshire c1901-10
£45
103 x 87.5cm


Somerset, Dorset and south-west Wiltshire. GW. Bacon & Co. were a major, Manchester-based, map publishing company in the latter decades of the 19th and early decades of the 20th centuries. Bacon's large, folding map (drawn and engraved by Bartholomew & Co) covers the counties of Somerset, Dorset and the south-west part of Wiltshire. It is on a scale of 2 miles to the inch, and also includes an inset geographical map of the area. Part of a series of regional UK maps on the same scale, it is undated, but quotes 1901 census data, so was probably published soon after this became available. The map is printed in full colour, dissected into 24 linen-backed segments and folds into cloth covered boards (rather faded). In the bottom left-hand corner a gazetteer gives basic information on all towns of note, and there is a triangular distance chart with mileages between the major cities and towns. A most attractive item, stylistically typical of its period.
 
J. Cary    A New Map of England and Wales with Part of Scotland 1794
£15
20.5 x 26.5cm


Eastern parts of Suffolk and Norfolk . This bound work comprised 81 contiguous map sheets, together with an index sheet. It covered all of England and Wales plus the southern half of Scotland. This is sheet 36 which includes the eastern parts of Suffolk and Norfolk. This copy is dated 1794, and is thus a first edition, in original outline colour. There were several later, updated editions. A little light print offsetting
 
J. Cary    A New Map of England and Wales with Part of Scotland 1794
£15
20.5 x 26.5cm


Western parts of Suffolk and Norfolk . This bound work comprised 81 contiguous map sheets, together with an index sheet. It covered all of England and Wales plus the southern half of Scotland. This is sheet 35 which includes western portions of Suffolk and Norfolk. This copy is dated 1794, and is thus a first edition, in original outline colour. There were several later, updated editions. A little light print offsetting.
 
J. Dower M.A. Pittman    The Sporting Magazine c1841-3
£35
22.5 x 18cm


Mr. Muir's Hunt. These hunting maps, engraved by John Dower for M.A. Pittman, originally appeared in the Sporting Review magazine in the early 1840's. The full set of 24 maps were also issued as The Fox Hunter's Atlas in c1843 and c1850. A later issue of the atlas in c1857 had 28 maps. Individual folding examples have also been found in red silk covers.The maps are based on the territory of each hunt irrespective of county borders.This example shows Mr. Muir's hunt, covering parts of Suffolk and Cambridgeshire. Modern colour.
 
R. Whitworth     Plan of the Intended Navigable Canal from Moor Fields into the River Lee at Waltham Abbey c1773
£225
51 x 13cm


This map was commissioned by the City of London, and surveyed by Robert Whitworth. It shows the proposed course of the new canal, the old River Lea, the so-called "New River", and something of the surrounding countryside.
 
J. Dower M.A. Pittman    The Sporting Magazine c1841-3
£35
18 x 22.5cm


The Marquis of Hastings Hunt . These hunting maps, engraved by John Dower for M.A. Pittman, originally appeared in the Sporting Review magazine in the early 1840's. The full set of 24 maps were also issued as The Fox Hunter's Atlas in c1843 and c1850. A later issue of the atlas in c1857 had 28 maps. Individual folding examples have also been found in red silk covers. The maps are based on the territory of each hunt irrespective of county borders. This example is from the magazine and shows The Marquis of Hastings hunt, covering parts of Leicestershire and Derbyshire. Modern colour.
 
J. Reynolds    Map of the Environs of London c1875
£165
78 x 51cm


London Environs. James Reynolds' lithographed map covers from St. Albans to Godalming, and from Rayleigh to Farnham. It is in printed colour, linen-backed (but not dissected), and folds into boards covered in red cloth, gilt.
 
W. Palmer    Twenty-Five Miles Round London 1806
£75
27.5 x 28.5cm


London Environs. A circular map of the environs of London, covering from Welwyn to Charlwood and from Stanford Le Hope to Windsor. The map is dissected and linen-backed but missing the slip case in which it is assumed it would have been issued. Original colour. Condition is poor - the surface is rather grubby: repair to a small torn section outside the printed area; a few small chips to the lower extremity; the title for some reason repeated below the map in a contemporary hand. Uncommon. See Howgego (Printed Maps of London), No.187 (3).
 
W. Faden    A Topographical Map of the Country Twenty Miles Round London 1800
£425
75 x 75cm


London Environs. A circular map of the environs of London, covering from Stapleford to Dorking, and from East Tilbury to Eton, updated to show the Paddington Canal. The map is dissected and linen-backed and folds into its original slipcase with label. A little light off-setting. Original colour. See Howgego (Printed Maps of London), No. 193 (2).
 
Anon.    Source Unknown 19th Century
£8
12.5 x 8cm


Scarborough Environs. I have not yet been able to trace the source of this neat little map showing the Environs of Scarborough, but believe it is probably from a 19th century guidebook to Yorkshire or to the Watering Places of England. It is marked as Plate 32, Page 296. If anyone out there can shed any light, please do let me know
 
J. Jansson    Atlas Minor 1628-51
£75
25 x 18cm


The Atlas Minor was first published in 1607 by Jodocus Hondius the younger, as a reduced size version of the large Mercator/Hondius world atlas. From 1607-21 Hondius issued 9 editions in 3 languages - Latin, French and German. In 1628 Jan Jansson issued his own edition of the atlas, with new plates engraved by Abraham Goos and Pieter van den Keere. Between 1628 and 1651 he also issued 9 editions of his Atlas Minor, again with text in the same 3 languages. This map of SW England and Wales comes from one of the French editions of the Jansson atlas. It bears the French title Quatriesme Table D'Angleterre above the top border, and has French text to the veso.
 
J. Andrews    Andrews Accurate Map of the Country Twenty-Five Miles Round London - sheet 7 1807 (1777)
£250
66 x 49.5cm


Northen Home Counties. Between 1774 and 1777 John Andrews and Andrew Dury published the 20 sheets of their map titled A Map of the Country Sixty Five Miles Round London. The map was drawn from original surveys by Andrews at a scale of 7/8" to the mile. Individual sheets were also combined in subsets to make up maps of smaller areas - for example 4 sheets were used for a smaller map of the country 25 miles round London, and similarly for Windsor or Richmond. This is a single sheet (no 7) from a later edition published by Stockdale in 1807 (see Howgego - "The Printed Maps of London" - no.160). It is titled Andrews Accurate Map of the Country Twenty-Five Miles Round London, and covers the area to the north-west of the capital in great detail, from Beaconsfield in the west to Waltham Abbey in the east, and from Welwyn in the north to Perivale and Hackney in the south. Two repaired tears to the margins along the platemarks, not affecting the image.
 
C. Knight    The Imperial Cyclopaedia. Cyclopaedia of Geography 1852
£22
23 x 18cm


Northern Home Counties. Charles Knight was a significant London publisher, best known for his association with The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (SDUK), for whom he published a number of educational works, including maps. Amongst these was an atlas, originally published in c1830 by Baldwin & Cradock on behalf of the Society. From 1834 publication passed to Charles Knight, who secured the rights to the maps after the demise of the SDUK in 1846. Knight re-issued them in his Imperial Cyclopaedia, adding to the original sectional UK maps a number of new ones of individual counties. The date of 1852 is often ascribed to the Cyclopaedia, but as this appears only a preface it may be that the maps appeared earlier in partworks, with collected prelims being issued for binding with them once the series was completed. Reproduction was by lithography, and maps were finished with outline hand colour to mark county and/or divisional boundaries, as here.Uncommon.
 
J. Cary    A New Map of England and Wales with Part of Scotland 1794
£35
20.5 x 26cm


North-east Yorkshire and south-east Durham. This bound work comprised 81 contiguous map sheets, together with an index sheet. It covered all of England and Wales plus the southern half of Scotland. These two sheets are numbers 60 and 61 covering the Yorkshire coast as far south as Hunmanby and inland as far as Northallerton, and the south-eastern part of Durham. They are dated 1794, and are thus from a first edition of the work, in original wash colour. There were several later, updated editions.
 
J. Cary    Cary's New Six-Sheet Map of England and Wales with part of Scotland (single sheet) 1810-c1840
£35
50 x 44cm


Southern Scotland and parts of NW England and Northern Ireland. John Cary published a number different of multi-sheet maps of England and Wales at varying scales, often available in a number of different formats. This work was first published in 1818, with subsequent up-dated editions up to around 1840. This sheet is the top left of the six sheets, covering all of Southern Scotland as far north as the Firth of Tay, part of Northern Ireland and parts of Cumberland, Westmorland, Northumberland and the Isle of Man. Original outline colour.
 
Anon.    Source Publication Unknown c1860
£15
58.5 x 53cm


Eastern Counties of England. This map is sheet 8 of what was probably a 12 sheet map of England and Wales. It broadly covers the eastern counties of England, including all or most of Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire. There are no signatures to assist in attribution to a specific author, but the style may suggest Cary or Cruchley. A date of c1860 is suggested by evidence of telegraph cables crossing the North Sea - cables from the UK to Heligoland dating from 1859 are marked, but not the cable from Lowestoft to Zandvoort which was laid in 1862. The map was produced by lithographic transfer, and is in original colour.
 
E. Weller    The Dispatch Atlas 1863
£130
8 Sheets, each c31.5 x 47 cmscm


London Environs. The Weekly Dispach newspaper first published a set of maps between 1856 and 1862 which included various maps covering London, including this 8 sheet map of the London environs, at a scale of one inch to the mile, stretching out c18-24 miles from the city centre. The sheets were drawn and engraved by Edward Weller, and the area covered includes Chesham, St. Albans, Broxbourne, Chelmsford, Benfleet, Maidstone,Sevenoaks, Reigate, Dorking, Guildford and Windsor The maps were subsequently also included in the Weekly Dispach Atlas, published in 1863, and from which this example is taken.The printing plates then passes to Cassel & Co. in the same year. Cassell continued publication from 1863, selling the maps singly and in atlas format under their own imprint. The map sheets have some small holes to their left hand margins where they were sewn into the binding of the atlas, but are otherwise complete, and if desired could be pasted together to form one large sheet for framing (in which case most of these small holes could be hidden by a mount). Either way the set provides a very good illustration of the state of development of the capital and its hinterland in the mid 19th century. Original colour.
 
W. Hollar    The Quartermaster's Map 1644-1752
£495
51.5 x 39cm


Eastern and Midland Counties. This map sheet - one of a set of 6 covering the whole of England and Wales - was engraved by Wenceslas Hollar and published by Thomas Jenner in 1644 to seize a commercial opportunity presented by the English Civil War. When war broke out in 1642, the contending generals' needs for maps seems to have swiftly resulted in a shortage of suitable material. Jenner sought to meet this need by issuing a set of regional maps "useful for all comanders for quarteringe of souldiers and all sorts of persons that would be informed where the armies be". For this reason the maps are today known as The Quartermaster's Map. Hollar used as his cartographic source the large 20 sheet map of England and Wales published by Christoper Saxton around 1583, reducing this to a more manageable 6 sheets, originally sold as a set. There were later re-issues by Jenner in 1671, by John Garrett in 1688 and John Rocque in 1752. This copy is believed to be from one of these later editions. Original outline colour. Scarce.