Copperplate

(Maps) Sussex : 14 items
J. Speed    Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine 1676 (1612)
£930
50.5 x 38cm


John Speed's maps of the English and Welsh counties are amongst the most decorative of early, British cartographic work, and are eagerly sought after today. They were first published in 1612 in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, designed as a companion volume to Speed's History of Great Britaine. The maps were based on the earlier surveys of Saxton, Norden and a few others, with engraving contracted to Jodocus Hondius whose signature appears on 33 of the maps. Speed's greatest innovation was the inclusion of inset plans of major towns and cities. Although some were copied from earlier work, for many towns this was first plan ever published. Speed's county atlas was re-issued a number of times for a period of around 160 years, with new publishers making various small changes and updates to the maps over time. This example bears the imprint of Basset & Chiswell, dating it to the edition of 1676. A most attractive map based on John Norden's original work.
Ref: SUS 690
 
J. Blaeu    Atlas Mayor 1659 or 1662 (1645)
£550
52 x 38cm


The Blaeu family were one of the leading Dutch map producers of the 17th century. Their major work was a multi volume world atlas initiated by Willem Blaeu and expanded by his son Joan. Their maps were beautifully designed and engraved, and are often found with original colour, making them most desirable to collectors. 1645 saw the first publication of volume 4 of the atlas, containing maps of England and Wales. There were several re-issues between then and 1672 when most of Blaeu's plates were lost in a fire which engulfed his Amsterdam premises. Spanish text on verso dates this example to the 1659 or 1662 editions. Original full colour. Repaired top and bottom centrefold tears but well outside the printed area.
Ref: SUS 691
 
J. Seller    Camden's Britannia Abridg'd 1701 (c1695)
£45
15 x 12cm


First published in Anglia Contracta in c1695, John Seller's maps were subsequently reissued in A History of England in 1696, and in Camden's Britannia Abridg'd in 1701. They were later re-used in the 1780's in Grose's Antiquities of England and Wales, for which titles and scale-bars were changed, the maps also being set in a page of text. The Seller/Grose maps are common, the originals by Seller much less so. This example of the Sussex map is from Camden's Britannia Abridg'd published in 1701. Modern hand colour. Supplied mounted.
Ref: SUS 018
 
F. Grose J. Seller    The Antiquities of England & Wales 1787-1809 (1695)
£30
15 x 12cm


Coloured. In 1695 John Seller published a county atlas titled Anglia Contracta. The plates were much later acquired by Francis Grose, revised, and used in a supplement to his partwork on British antiquities. The supplement with maps was first published in 1787, and ran to several later editions.
Ref: SUS 693
 
S. Simpson    The Agreeable Historian 1746
£80
19 x 16cm


The Agreeable Historian was a weekly partwork, intended to be bound into 3 volumes when completed. It was issued in 109 parts beween December 1743 and December 1745, with the final title page being dated 1746. The work was a topographical review of the counties of England, being published by R. Walker, with Samuel Simpson cited as the author.
Ref: SUS 020
 
T. Hutchinson    Geographia Magnae Britanniae 1748
£45
17 x 14.5cm


This small county atlas of England and Wales was first issued in 1748 by a consortium of 7 publishers who also had a stake in the publication of Daniel Defoe's Tour Through the Whole Island of Great Britain. It was advertised as a companion volume to Defoe's work, or as a pocket atlas in its own right. Thomas Hutchinson's name appears as the engraver on 2 maps, but the rest are unsigned and may be by a variety of hands. They are sometimes also known as Osborne/Wale maps. There was a second edition in 1756. A short tear repaired on the verso without loss. Mounted.
Ref: SUS 006
 
J. Ellis    Ellis's English Atlas 1766 (1765)
£95
25 x 19.5cm


Joseph Ellis's English Atlas was an entry into the market for small county atlases by its publishers Robert Sayer and Carington Bowles. The county maps were closely based upon those drawn by Thomas Kitchin for the 1763 topographical work England Illustrated, the major difference being the attractive vignettes which replaced Kitchin's rococco cartouches. The atlas was first published in 1765, and soon became a commercial success, running to many later editions. It was promoted as a travelling atlas, and made available in various formats. These included a version with the maps printed back to back on each page, as with this example from a 1766 edition which has a map of Surrey on the reverse.
Ref: SUS 696
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£37
26.5 x 21cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: SUS 697
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£105
53.5 x 48cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour. A vertical crease, and some repaired tears at lower centrefold.
Ref: SUS 701
 
J. Pigot    British Atlas c1829 (c1826)
£65
35.5 x 23.5cm


James Pigot & Co's county maps were issued in their British Atlas (from c1830), in several of their national and local business directories (from at least 1826 for the "home counties", including Sussex), and singly in folding form as travelling maps. They were amongst the first maps to be printed from steel instead of copper plates, allowing more accurate fine detail and less wear to the plates over time. Atlas and directories went through several editions up to around 1857, later editions from 1846 being re-named Slater's New British Atlas, with imprints changed accordingly. This example is from the first atlas edition of c1829. Original outline colour. A slight crease.
Ref: SUS 017
 
J. Barclay T. Moule    Barclay's Universal English Dictionary 1844/1845 (1837)
£80
26 x 20cm


Thomas Moule's antiquarian leanings are evident in this series of highly decorative county maps - a stylistic throwback in an age when cartographic work had become much plainer and more utilitarian. The maps were engraved by W. Smollinger, J. Bingley and J. Dower, and first appeared in Moule's English Counties Delineated, a partwork with text issued from 1830-32. They were subsequently made available as a complete work in 1837 under the same title, and were later re-issued in Barclay's Universal English Dictionary between 1842 and 1852. This latter work ran to several editions and the maps were often updated between editions to show the latest growth of the railway network. This example in modern colour can be dated by railway information to the 1844 or 1845 editions of Barclay's Dictionary. Supplied mounted and ready for framing.
Ref: SUS 004
 
J. Lodge    Untitled Atlas of the English Counties c1795
£120
31.5 x 25.5cm


This was one of a set of county maps engraved by John Lodge and issued between 1787 and 1790 in The Political Magazine, and Parliamentary, Naval, Military and Literary Journal, published initially by John Murray, and later by R. Butters. The maps were subsequently collected together and re-issued as an atlas (without title page) around 1795. For this atlas edition the imprint with the publication date and engraver's and publisher's signatures was removed from the maps. This example is from the atlas edition. The maps are well engraved in the plainer style then coming into vogue. They are uncommon, and sought by collectors.
Ref: SUS 016
 
R. Creighton S. Lewis    View of the Representative History of England 1835
£24
25 x 18cm


This work was published in 1835 as a companion volume to Lewis's Topographic Dictionary. It contains county and borough maps, drawn by R. Creighton and engaved by J.& C. Walker, and was designed to show the electoral and boundary changes effected by the 1832 Reform Act. There were 2 issues of the work in 1835 and 1840, this example of the county map being from the 1835 first edition. Original outline colour.
Ref: SUS 002
 
H. Teesdale R. Rowe    New British Atlas 1830 (1812-14)
£45
41 x 34cm


This detailed and well engraved map was one of a set first published around 1812-14 by Robert Rowe, who was probably also their draftsman and engraver. The maps were initially sold singly in folding format until their collective issue in 1816 as The English Atlas. The plates were later acquired by Henry Teesdale, who amended titles and imprints and re-issued the work as the New British Atlas in 1829, with several re-issues up to 1842. The plates were later acquired and used by H.G. Collins and then by G. Philip and Son, who both used them as the base for lithographic transfers for a variety of works up to c1860. This example is from the 1830 second edition of Teesdale's atlas. Original wash colour. One repaired tear entering the lower border by c1.5cm.
Ref: SUS 008