Copperplate

Scotland : 22 items
V. Coronelli    Le Royaume D'Ecosse - sold singly 1689
£695
61 x 46cm


Scotland. The map shows mainland Scotland and the western isles, with inset maps of the Orkneys, Shetlands and Faroe Islands.It was drawn and engraved by Vincenzo Coronelli and published in Paris by J.B. Nolin in 1689. The dedication is to the Prince of Wales, son of king James II (i.e. to the infant prince James Francis Edward Stuart who later became known as the "Old Pretender"). In fact James had been replaced as king by William of Orange the year before this map is dated, but in France (where he lived in exile) he was still regarded as the legitimate king of England and Scotland. Some repairs and stregthening to the verso towards the bottom of the map with slight loss and restoration, but still a most attractive and uncommon item. The ideal present for an unreformed Jacobite!
Ref: SCT 002
 
J. Cary    Cary's New Six-Sheet Map of England and Wales with part of Scotland 1810-c1840
£35
50 x 44cm


Southern Scotland and parts of NW England and Northern Ireland. John Cary published a number different of multi-sheet maps of England and Wales at varying scales, often available in a number of different formats. This work was first published in 1818, with subsequent up-dated editions up to around 1840. This sheet is the top left of the six sheets, covering all of Southern Scotland as far north as the Firth of Tay, part of Northern Ireland and parts of Cumberland, Westmorland, Northumberland and the Isle of Man. Original outline colour.
Ref: REG 089
 
B. Capper    Topographical Dictionary of the UK 1808
£15
21 x 18cm


Scotland south/central. Southern and central Scotland (almost as far north as the Moray Firth). Benjamin Pitts Capper was the author of this topographical directory, first published by R. Phillips in 1808. The maps were engraved, and possibly drawn by H. Cooper. Later editions of the work carry the imprint of G.and W.B. Whittaker who re-published the book from 1825-34. This example is from the first edition of 1808, with the counties shown in original, full wash colour.
Ref: SCT 926
 
T. Murray    An Atlas of the English Counties 1830
£12
45.5 x 68.5cm


The title page of Murray's county atlas states that the maps were "Projected on the basis of the Trigonometrical Survey by order of the hon.ble The Board of Ordnance, under the superindendance of T.L. Murray". This might seem to imply the project had at least the official blessing, if not the active involvement of the Ordnance Survey, but is more likely to be a marketing puff. Reeves. Murray's Atlas was first published in 1830, with second and third editions in 1831 and 1832, the latter with the adddition of electoral data. by 1838 the plates had been acquired by W. Robson & Co. who published and sold the maps individually, and also used them in their commercial directories. Apart from the English county maps, the atlas contained 4 larger general maps, including this double-page one of Scotland. This example is from the first edition of 1830. Original colour. Repaired tears to top and bottom centrefold, and a further repaired tear entering c2 cms. inside the right-hand border. A little light offsetting.
Ref: SCT 006
 
Homann    Neuer Atlas? c1714-30
£525
47 x 56.5cm


Scotland. Scotland, with original bodywash colour. The Homann family revived German mapmaking in the 18th century. This map is by the founder of the business Johann Baptist Homann who died in 1724, and is probably from one of the editions of the Neuer Atlas.
Ref: SCT 1144
 
J. Jansson    Novus Atlas 1659
£425
52.5 x 43.5cm


Scotland south/central. The map covers southern and central Scotland from the English border to the river Tay. Jansson never published a separate volume of maps of Scotland to rival that of Blaeu. Instead he initially included 3 maps of the country in his volume IV of 1646 which covered the British Isles as a whole. In 1659 these were augmented by six new Scottish maps which appeared in the Dutch and German editions of the atlas in 1659. This example, which lacks any signatures of authorship, is one of these maps.Original full colour, with no text to verso.
Ref: SCT 1145
 
N. Sanson    A Map of Scotland Divided into Counties 1693 (1665)
£350
54.5 x 40.5cm


Central and Southern Scotland. Nicholas Sanson was the foremost of the early French cartographers. This map was one of a set of 4 covering Scotland which first appeared in the 1665 edition of his atlas entitled Cartes Generales de Toutes Les Parties du Monde. After Sanson's death in 1667, his sons briefly managed his business before transferring it to Hubert Jaillot, who continued to issue Sanson's maps and to add to them with new ones of his own. This example of Sanson's regional map of southern Scotland up to the Tay is dated 1690, and was issued by Jaillot under the title of Atlas Nouveau in 1693.
Ref: SCT 003
 
S.D.U.K.    Source Publication Unknown 1834
£30
29 x 35cm


The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (SDUK), produced a number of works to capitalise upon the growing Victorian trend for education and self-improvement. These included a number of maps, plans and topographical books and partworks. This map is one of two which show the British Isles in ancient (Roman period) times. It covers all of Scotland and the far northern part of England and Wales, giving names of iron age tribes, and Roman names for rivers and settlements where known. Original outline colour. The map was engraved by J.& C. Walker and published on behalf of the SDUK by Baldwin & Cradock. It is dated 1834.
 
M.J. Armstrong    A. Scotch Atlas or Description of the Kingdom of Scotland 1777-94
£45
14 x 19cm


Caithness-shire. Mostyn John Armstrong's Scotch Atlas, was first published by Sayer and Bennet in London in 1777, a year after Armstrong had moved his domicile to Norfolk. It contained 30 maps - 3 general and 27 of the Scottish Counties - all skilfully engraved by H. Ashby. There were two later re-issues in 1787 and 1794. The work is one of only 3 Scottish county atlases published in the 1700's (or 4 if you include the series in the London Magazine), and maps from it are scarce. Original wash colour. A "tide mark" from a previous mounting. Some browning to verso.
Ref: CAI 002
 
M.J. Armstrong    A. Scotch Atlas or Description of the Kingdom of Scotland 1777-94
£60
13.5 x 19cm


Haddingtonshire. Mostyn John Armstrong's Scotch Atlas, was first published by Sayer and Bennet in London in 1777, a year after Armstrong had moved his domicile to Norfolk. It contained 30 maps - 3 general and 27 of the Scottish Counties - all skilfully engraved by H. Ashby. There were two later re-issues in 1787 and 1794. The work is one of only 3 Scottish county atlases published in the 1700's (or 4 if you include the series in the London Magazine), and maps from it are scarce. Original wash colour. Slightly grubby outer white borders, which would be hidden if mounted.
Ref: HAD 002
 
T. Kitchin    Geographia Scotiae 1748/1756
£55
17 x 15cm


Kincardineshire. Thomas Kitchin provided the maps for this Scottish county atlas, first published in 1748 as a companion volume to Geographia Magnae Britanniae, which came out the same year. The two books were often bound together, but could also be purchased separately. There was a second edition of the work in 1756. Stain from old mounting tape to the top edge of the top white margin, but 0.8 cms above the printed border.
Ref: KIN 001
 
T. Kitchin    Geographia Scotiae 1748/1756
£55
17 x 15cm


Lanarkshire. Thomas Kitchin provided the maps for this Scottish county atlas, first published in 1748 as a companion volume to Geographia Magnae Britanniae, which came out the same year. The two books were often bound together, but could also be purchased separately. There was a second edition of the work in 1756. This map combines the counties of Lanarkshire and Peebles. Stain from old mounting tape to the top white margin, just impinging the plate number but not otherwise affecting the printed image.
 
J. Blaeu T. Pont    Theatrum Orbis Terrarum 1654
£160
52 x 41cm


Liddesdale (part of Roxburgshire). Timothy Pont is probably the foremost of Scotland's early cartographers, and from the early 1580's until his early death in c 1611-14, he surveyed much of the country. Most of his work was not, however, published in his lefetime. The manuscript maps he left eventually found their way to John Blaeu in Amsterdam, who used them as the basis for volume 5 (devoted to maps of Scotland and Ireland and first published in 1654)) of his world atlas. Of the 46 Scottish maps in the volume, 36 carry attributions to Pont as author, including this one of Liddesdale, part of Roxburghshire.
Ref: ROX 001
 
T. Kitchin    The London Magazine 1763-76
£45
21.5 x 17cm


Selkirkshire. Between 1763 and 1881 The London Magazine published an occasional series of Scottish county maps. Thomas Kitchin was attributed as the author of all the earlier maps, but authorship was shared with J. Barber on later issues. The Selkirk map is attributed to Kitchin alone. It is undated, but was issued before 1776, after which the designation "for the London Magazine" was shortened. Somewhat toned, with some monor restoration to top-right corner of border, and old tape stains in the lower border, which would be hidden by a new mount.
Ref: SEL 001
 
T. Kitchin    Geographia Scotiae 1748/1756
£55
16.5 x 15.5cm


Selkirkshire. Thomas Kitchin provided the maps for this Scottish county atlas, first published in 1748 as a companion volume to Geographia Magnae Britanniae, which came out the same year. The two books were often bound together, but could also be purchased separately. There was a second edition of the work in 1756.
Ref: SEL 002
 
M.J. Armstrong    A. Scotch Atlas or Description of the Kingdom of Scotland 1777-1794
£60
14 x 19.5cm


Selkirkshire. Mostyn John Armstrong's Scotch Atlas, was first published by Sayer and Bennet in London in 1777, a year after Armstrong had moved his domicile to Norfolk. It contained 30 maps - 3 general and 27 of the Scottish Counties - all skilfully engraved by H. Ashby. There were two later re-issues in 1787 and 1794. The work is one of only 3 Scottish county atlases published in the 1700's (or 4 if you include the series in the London Magazine), and maps from it are scarce. Original wash colour. The map bears the imprint of Sayer and Bennet and the date 1777, marking it as a first edition.
Ref: SEL 004
 
J. Bellin    Le Petit Atlas Maritime 1764
£65
17 x 22.5cm


The Shetland Isles. Jacques Nicholas Bellin was chief hydrographer to the French Hydrographical Office (Depot des Cartes et Plans de la Marine) from 1741 in which capacity he was responsible for a large number of well-executed naval charts. In 1764 he published his Petit Atlas de la Marine, which comprised, in 5 volumes, some 580 worldwide oceanic and coastal charts and harbour plans. This chart of the Shetland Isles was amongst them. Uncommon.
Ref: SHE 002
 
M.J. Armstrong    A. Scotch Atlas or Description of the Kingdom of Scotland 1777-94
£45
14 x 19.5cm


Sutherlandshire. Mostyn John Armstrong's Scotch Atlas, was first published by Sayer and Bennet in London in 1777, a year after Armstrong had moved his domicile to Norfolk. It contained 30 maps - 3 general and 27 of the Scottish Counties - all skilfully engraved by H. Ashby. There were two later re-issues in 1787 and 1794. The work is one of only 3 Scottish county atlases published in the 1700's (or 4 if you include the series in the London Magazine), and maps from it are scarce. Original wash colour. A few light-brown spots. Remargined on left-hand side where trimmed close to border. A light "tide mark" from a previous mounting.
Ref: SUT 001
 
J. Blaeu T. Pont    Theatrum Orbis Terrarum 1754
£160
53 x 41.5cm


Western Galloway (Wigtonshire). Timothy Pont is probably the foremost of Scotland's early cartographers, and from the early 1580's until his early death in c 1611-14, he surveyed much of the country. Most of his work was not, however, published in his lefetime. The manuscript maps he left eventually found their way to John Blaeu in Amsterdam, who used them as the basis for volume 5 (devoted to maps of Scotland and Ireland and first published in 1654)) of his world atlas. Of the 46 Scottish maps in the volume, 36 carry attributions to Pont as author, including this one of western Galloway. An early edition without the sailing ships added for the 1662 Atlas Maior edition.
Ref: WIG 001
 
T. Kitchin    Geographia Scotiae 1748/1756
£55
17 x 15.5cm


Wigtonshire. Thomas Kitchin provided the maps for this Scottish county atlas, first published in 1748 as a companion volume to Geographia Magnae Britanniae, which came out the same year. The two books were often bound together, but could also be purchased separately. There was a second edition of the work in 1756.
Ref: WIG 002
 
S.D.U.K.    Source Publication Unknown 1834
£30
29 x 35cm


Scotland. The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (SDUK), produced a number of works to capitalise upon the growing Victorian trend for education and self-improvement. These included a number of maps, plans and topographical books and partworks. This map is one of two which show the British Isles in ancient (Roman period) times. It covers all of Scotland and the far northern part of England and Wales, giving names of iron age tribes, and Roman names for rivers and settlements where known. Original outline colour. The map was engraved by J.& C. Walker and published on behalf of the SDUK by Baldwin & Cradock. It is dated 1834.
Ref: SCT 011
 
Anon.    Source Publication Unknown c1890-1920?
£15
55 x 42cm


Scotland. I have so far been unable to identify the source atlas from which this map comes. The style and colour printing suggests a date of perhaps 1890-1920, but this must be taken only as a guide. There are four repaired tears - two short, marginal ones not affecting the image, and two slightly longer ones entering the printed area by c 2cms. Despite these minor blemishes the map would still frame-up and display well.
Ref: SCT 012