Copperplate

A. Hogg : 295 items

Maps

A. Hogg    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1789
£45
33.5 x 22cm


West/Central Scotland. The Antiquities of England and Wales was first published by Alexander Hogg as a partwork between 1787 and 1789, and subsequently sold as a complete work from c1789. there were 3 later editions, the last in 1798. The work contained a set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin, which had originally been issued in the London Magazine, and several general maps covering Wales, Scotland and Ireland. The maps of North and South Wales, of Ulster and of Northern Scotland with the Orkneys and Shetlands had been used in a previous Hogg publication - The New British Traveller - but the other 3 Scottish maps and 3 Irish Province maps were new. These were engraved by Thomas Conder. This page has two maps on one sheet, one covering the counties of Argyle, Bute and Dumbarton, and the other Western Isles.
Ref: SCT 015
 
A. Hogg    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1789
£56
32 x 22.5cm


Sothern Scotland. The Antiquities of England and Wales was first published by Alexander Hogg as a partwork between 1787 and 1789, and subsequently sold as a complete work from c1789. there were 3 later editions, the last in 1798. The work contained a set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin, which had originally been issued in the London Magazine, and several general maps covering Wales, Scotland and Ireland. The maps of North and South Wales, of Ulster and of Northern Scotland with the Orkneys and Shetlands had been used in a previous Hogg publication - The New British Traveller - but the other 3 Scottish maps and 3 Irish Province maps were new. These were engraved by Thomas Conder. This map covers the counties of Stirling, Lanark, Renfrew, Linlithgow, Edinburgh, Peebles, Haddington, Berwick, Selkirk, Roxburgh, Dumfries, Wigton, Kirkudbright and Ayr.
Ref: SCT 016
 
A. Hogg    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1789
£75
21.5 x 30.5cm


Connaught. The Antiquities of England and Wales was a weekly partwork published by Alexander Hogg from 1787-9, to compete with Grose's similar work on antiquities which had just been completed. The nominal editor of the work, Henry Boswell, may or not have actually existed. Hogg included a set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin, which had first appeared in the London Magazine between 1747 and 1765, with general maps of the other parts of the British Isles - some newly engraved, some previously issued by Hogg. This map of Connaught was one of 4 engraved by Thomas Conder to cover the Irish provinces.
Ref: IRL 013
 
A. Hogg    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1789
£60
32 x 22.5cm


Munster. The Province of Leinster -The Antiquities of England and Wales was first published by Alexander Hogg as a partwork between 1787 and 1789, and subsequently sold as a complete work from c1789. there were 3 later editions, the last in 1798. The work contained a set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin, which had originally been issued in the London Magazine, and several general maps covering Wales, Scotland and Ireland. The maps of North and South Wales, of Ulster and of Northern Scotland with the Orkneys and Shetlands had been used in a previous Hogg publication - The New British Traveller - but the other 3 Scottish maps and 3 Irish Province maps were new. Most were engraved by Thomas Conder, the exception being this map of Munster, engraved by Thomas Conder. It comes from the first complete edition of Boswell's Antiquities... in c1789.
Ref: IRL 011
 
A. Hogg    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1789
£65
20.5 x 30.5cm


Leinster. The Province of Leinster -The Antiquities of England and Wales was first published by Alexander Hogg as a partwork between 1787 and 1789, and subsequently sold as a complete work from c1789. there were 3 later editions, the last in 1798. The work contained a set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin, which had originally been issued in the London Magazine, and several general maps covering Wales, Scotland and Ireland. The maps of North and South Wales, of Ulster and of Northern Scotland with the Orkneys and Shetlands had been used in a previous Hogg publication - The New British Traveller - but the other 3 Scottish maps and 3 Irish Province maps were new. Most were engraved by Thomas Conder, the exception being this map of Leinster, engraved by Garnet Terry. It comes from the first complete edition of Boswell's Antiquities... in c1789.. A few light brown spots.
Ref: IRL 010
 
A. Hogg    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1789 (1784)
£80
31.5 x 20.5cm


Ulster. The Province of Ulster -The Antiquities of England and Wales was first published by Alexander Hogg as a partwork between 1787 and 1789, and subsequently sold as a complete work from c1789. there were 3 later editions, the last in 1798. The work contained a set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin, which had originally been issued in the London Magazine, and several general maps covering Wales, Scotland and Ireland. The maps of North and South Wales, of Ulster and of Northern Scotland with the Orkneys and Shetlands had been used in a previous Hogg publication - The New British Traveller issued in 1784 - but the other 3 Scottish maps and 3 Irish Province maps were new, most being engraved by Thomas Conder. This example of Conder's Ulster map comes from the first complete edition of Boswell's Antiquities... in c1789.. A few spots.
Ref: IRL 012
 

UK and British Atlases

A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England & Wales c1787-9
£1550
c16.5 x 21.5(Kitchin)c20 x 30(others)cm


Original full leather binding, rather rubbed and with the front cover detached. Internally a good and clean copy with just a few spotted pages. Issued as a weekly partwork from c1787-9.50 maps in total - 40 English counties, 2 of Wales, 4 of Scotland and one of each of the 4 Irish provinces. Virtually all the maps are in very good condition apart from 4 with slight spotting. All the English counties except Yorkshire are by Kitchin, using maps which first appeared in the London Magazine from 1747-63. The Leinster map is by Garnet Terry. The remaining maps are by Thomas Conder and 5 of them had previously appeared in Hogg's publication theNew British Traveller from 1784. Numerous topographical engavings throughout the text.
Ref: ABR 857
 

Topographical prints of Cambridge and Cambridgeshire

A. Hogg    The New British Traveller 1784
£20
22.5 x 33cm


Cambridge - Barnwell/Chesterton . Uncoloured copper engraving. Two illustrations on one plate.
Ref: TOP 1027
 
A. Hogg    The New British Traveller 1784
£6
24.5 x 14cm


Cambridgeshire - Camps Castle. Uncoloured copper engraving.
Ref: TOP 1028
 

Topographical prints - other areas

A. Hogg    Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-89
£7
17.5 x 16cm


Bedfordshire - Houghton Park House. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Houghton House, near Ampthill, was built in the early 17th century. Its ruins are still extant and administered by English Heritage. This print was engraved by Lodge and comes with the original, accompanying text page from the work.
Ref: TOP 615
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 13.5cm


St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This print, in good condition, was engraved by Thornton, and is supplied with the original text.
Ref: TOP 639
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18 x 12cm


St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This print, in good condition, was engraved by Lowry.
Ref: TOP 231
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 13.5cm


Dunnington Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The remains of Donnington Castle, just north of Newbury, are today administered by English Heritage. This print was engraved by Thornton, and is supplied with the original accompanying text page and a plan of the castle.
Ref: TOP 232
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
19 x 13cm


Dunnington Castle Gateway. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Donnington Castle is just north of Newbury. Its ruins, of which the gateway is the largest surviving part, are today administered by English Heritage. This print was engraved by Peltro.A small brown spot to the lower title.
Ref: TOP 233
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c787-9
£7
19 x 15cm


Bustlesham or Bysham Monastery. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Bisham Abbey stood on the banks of the Thames about 5 miles from Marlow. The site is now a sports centre. The old Manor House which stood next to the abbey still survives and is hired out for events. This print was engraved by Noble and is supplied with the original accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 638
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16.5 x 27.5cm


Reading Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The ruins of the abbey and its associated buildings still stand in the centre of the modern town where Reading Council has plans to restore and develop the site. This print was engraved by Page, and is supplied with the original accompanying text. A couple of light brown spots.
Ref: TOP 235
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 32cm


Reading Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The remains of the abbey and its associated buildings still stand in the centre of Reading. These two prints on a single sheet were engraved by Rennoldson. Some browning to the right-hand side of the page.
Ref: TOP 236
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£5
17.5 x 15cm


Gothurst. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Gothurst (or Gayhurst) House is Elizabethan in date, though its estate dates back to the Norman conquest. The house is c4 miles from Newport Pagnell and survives today, having been converted into individual residential properties in the 1970's. This print was engraved by Lodge. A little foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 114
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 14cm


Nutley Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Nutley (or Notley) Abbey was an Augustinian foundation of the mid 12th century, located near Thame. Its ruins were later incorporated into a private house, once the home of Sir Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh, and today available as a wedding venue. This print was engraved by "Peltro" - probably Peltro William Tomkins..
Ref: TOP 229
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 14cm


Burnham Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Burnham Abey was founded in1265 by the Benedictine order. Its restored remains now houses a body of Augustinian nuns. This print bears the signature of "Peltro" as engraver - probably Peltro William Tomkins. Supplied with the original accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 230
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
16.5 x 16cm


Eton College. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This print was engraved by Roberts, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 637
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22.5 x 34.5cm


Barnwell and Chesterton. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. At the time this print was taken, Barnwell and Chesterton were independent villages, but have since become suburbs of Cambridge. No artist's or engraver's signatures. A narrow right-hand margin, but with sufficient space to mount.
Ref: TOP 1433
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£5
24.5 x 16.5cm


Castle Camps. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Castle Camps was a Norman castle, around which grew the current village of the same name. It gradually fell into disrepair, and little today remains above ground, some of the wall being incorporated into Castle Farmhouse. The print bears no artist's or engraver's signatures. A few spots to the outer extremities of the wide margins.
Ref: TOP 109
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18 x 14cm


Thorney Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Thorney Abbey lies on what was once an island in the fens. The Benedictine Abbey was founded in 972AD, but a new Abbey church was built around 1085-9 after the Norman conquest. Following the dissolution of the monasteries this fell into disrepair and was robbed of much of its stone, but part of the nave was restored and became the parish church which is still in use today. This print was engraved by Warren.
Ref: TOP 234
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
23 x 35.5cm


East Gate, Chester; Sonne Gate, Coventry and Castle Ashby, Northants. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers 3 views on one sheet. Narrow vertical borders and a nick to the upper-left border.
Ref: TOP 153
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
22.5 x 33.5cm


Beeston Castle and Nantwich Church. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Beeston Castle was built in the 1220's by Ranulph de Blondeville, Earl of Chester. It was slighted by Cromwell during the civil war, and its ruins are today owned by English Heritage, who open it to the public. St. Mary's Church at Nantwich is one of the country's finest medieval churches and is grade 1 listed. Two prints on one sheet engraved by Lodge. A few brown spots and worm holes to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 138
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£20
30.5 x 22cm


The City of Chester. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This attractive print of Chester from across the river Dee bears no engraver's or artist's signatures. A couple of small worm holes and some light foxing to the margins, which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 1588
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16 x 10cm


Chester Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Chester Cathedral dates from 1093, when it was built as the Abbey Church of a Bendictine monastery, and has been the seat of the Bishop of Chester since 1541. This print was engraved by Goldar after a drawing by Hamilton. A few light-brown spots but otherwise in good order.
Ref: TOP 619
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£9
18.5 x 32cm


Beeston Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Beeston Castle was built in the 1220's by Ranulph de Blondeville, Earl of Chester. It was slighted by Cromwell during the civil war, and its ruins are today owned by English Heritage, who open it to the public. This print was engraved by Rennoldson, and offers two view of the castle. It is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 612
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18 x 15cm


Beeston Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Beeston Castle was built in the 1220's by Ranulph de Blondeville, Earl of Chester. It was slighted by Cromwell during the civil war, and its ruins are today owned by English Heritage, who open it to the public. This print was engraved by Lodge.
Ref: TOP 237
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18 x 17cm


Nantwich Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. St. Mary's Church at Nantwich is one of the country's finest medieval churches and is grade 1 listed. This print was engraved by Lodge, and is supplied with the original accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 238
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
31.5 x 19.5cm


Birkenhead Priory; Chester Castle & Water Tower: Beauchief Priory (Derbys.); Cockermouth Castle (Cumberland) and Portland Vicarage (Dorset). The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This anonymous print offers six views on one sheet, of which 2 are of Cheshire interest. Birkenhead Priory was a Benedictine foundation dating from 1150. The Priory Chapter house survived the dissolution of the monasteries as a chapel for the local community until the opening of the present St. Mary's Church in 1822. The chapel was restored in the ealy 1900's and is still extant. Chester Castle was built by Hugh Lupus in 1070. It was much modifield, rebuilt and added to over the years, and its remains are today part of a complex that includes law courts, and a museum. The Water Tower was built in the 1320's as part of the city defences and still stands on the walls.
Ref: TOP 239
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
27 x 17.5cm


Lestwithiel Palace. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Stannary Palace at Loswithiel was built by the Earls of Cornwall in the second half of the 13th century. It comprised several buildings with a variety of functions - law courts, taxation of the Cornish lead industry, a gaol, seat of the Stanarry Parliament, and general administration. Although badly damaged in the civil war several of the buildings have survived or been restored and remain in use today - still with various uses. This ananymous print shows the ruins of the Great Hall and another building - possibly the Exchequer Hall. A couple of small holes and some light foxing to the margin, all of which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 142
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 14.5cm


St. Michael's Mount. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. St. Michael's Mount is a rocky island in Mount's Bay adjoining the town of Marazion. It can be reached on foot at low tide, but is accessible at other times only by boat or amphibious vehicle. There have been buildings on the site since the 12th century, but since 1659 the castle has been the family home of the St. Aubyn family. The island is now mostly the property of the National Trust. This print was engraved by Lowry, and is supplied with the original accompanying text page from the work.
Ref: TOP 240
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
17.5 x 14.5cm


Pendennis Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Pendennis Castle was built by Henry V111 between 1539 and 1545, to protect the entrance to the river Fal from possible attack. It stands on a headland on the west bank of the river just outside Falmouth, and is today owned by English Heritage who open it to the public and hire it out for conferences and weddings. This print was engraved by Lowry.
Ref: TOP 241
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
17.5 x 30.5cm


Derwenwater, Broad Water and Windermere. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print offers views of Cumbrian lakes. At the time it was taken the English Lake District was just beginning to find a wider audience for its picuresque beauty. Broad Water was the old name applied to two of the lakes - Bassenthwaite and Brothers Water. As this view of Broadwater is designated as in Westmorland it relates to the latter of the two.
Ref: TOP 116
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 32cm


Naworth Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Naworth Castle is located close to Brampton, and was built in the late 13th century. It is today the private residence of Philip Howard, brother to the Earl of Carlisle. It is not open to the public but can be hired for private functions. This print was engraved by J.G. Wooding and is supplied with the original, accompanying text page from the work.
Ref: TOP 243
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16 x 10.5cm


Carlisle Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Carlisle Cathedral began life as an Augustinian Priory in 1122, but was soon promoted to cathedral status in 1133. It is one of the smallest cathedrals in the country, its nave having been partly demolished during the civil war. This print was engraved by Goldar after a drawing by Hamilton, and is suppplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 244
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 32.5cm


Lanercost Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Lanercost Priory, near Brampton was originally an Augustinian foundation by Robert de Vaux, dating from c1169. Part of the priory church is still in use as the parish church, and the rest of the church survives, but without its roof. Most of the other monastic building have disappeared, but the site is today managed by English Heritage.. This print was engraved by J. Gooding and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 245
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
15 x 11cm


Castlerigg Stone Circle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Castlerigg stone circle is a Neolithic monument built around 3000BC, and is located in a spectacular location, surrounded by high mountains a few miles east of Keswick. This anonymous print is supplied with the original accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 246
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
26.5 x 18.5cm


Antiquities at Netherhall & Keswick (Cumberland, and at Hexham (Northumberland) & Doctan (Fife). The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This anonymous print offers 4 views on one sheet, of various northern antiquities, including two from Cumberland. It is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 247
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
11 x 17cm


Obelisk in Bewcastle Churchyard. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This so-called "obelisk" is actually the larger part of an Anglo-Saxon cross which has lost its head. It dates from the 7th or early 8th centuries, and still stands today at its original site in St. Cuthbert's churchyard, Bewcastle. This anyonymous print fails to indicate the size of the monument which stands around 4.5 m tall.
Ref: TOP 248
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
24.5 x 15cm


Exeter. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers a perspective of Exeter from the south west.
Ref: TOP 082
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
24.5 x 16.5cm


Tavistock Abbey. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Tavistock Abbey was first founded in 961, though it had to rebuilt twice and most of the later buildings dated from the 15th century. It was a Benedictine foundation, located in the centre of the modern town of Tavistock. After the dissolution of the monasteries it fell graduallly into disrepair, was robbed of much of its stone, and the site rebuilt on. Today a few buidings from the complex survive, including the refectory, 2 gateways and a porch. This print has a little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 085
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 33.5cm


Mount Edgecumbe & Plymouth Docks. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Mount Edgecombe is a promontary on the west bank of the river Tamar looking across Plymouth Sound to the modern dockyards and city beyond. It gets its name from the Edgecumbe family whose estate was here located. Edgecumbe House and its grounds are now jointly owned by Cornwall and Plymouth Councils and are open to the public. St. Nicolas Island from where the first view is taken is now known as Drake's Island. Two prints on one sheet - a little foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 084
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 33cm


Dartmouth Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784
Ref: TOP 083
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
15 x 10cm


Exeter Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Exeter became the seat of the Saxon bishop of Devon and Cornwall in 1050, but the Norman cathedral was not founded until 1133, and not completed until c1400 due to changes in architectural taste. This print was engraved by Thornton. A little foxing to the margins.
Ref: TOP 251
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16 x 11cm


The Valley of Stones. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Now more usually referred to as the Valley of Rocks, this dry valley lies just west of the village of Lynton on the north Devon coast. It runs immediately parallel to the sea, and is sheltered on the seaward side by impressive rock formations falling sheer to the waves below. It is a popular tourst destination today and was obviously well know when this print was taken - the poets Wordsworth and Coleridge visited in1797. This print bears no artist's or engraver's signatures. A few light brown spots.
Ref: TOP 252
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
23 x 15.5cm


Blandford Forum - the principal street. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print showing the town's main street, was one of two adjacent views on one sheet. It has been remargined to the top where separated from its twin.
Ref: TOP 108
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales 1787-9
£8
17.5 x 11.5cm


Corfe Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Corfe Castle was built by William the Conqueror, being one of the first of the Norman castles to be built in stone. It endured 2 sieges during the English Civil War, being taken in the second siege of 1645 after which it was sleighted. Its picturesque remains are today the property of the National Trust who open it to the public. This anonymous print is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A few light brown spots.
Ref: TOP 253
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
31 x 20cm


High Force on the River Tees. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. High Force is a waterfall on the River Tees, neat Middleton-in-Teesdale. The river forms the boundary beween Durham and North Yorkshire and the falls are impressive, especially when in full spate.
Ref: TOP 126
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
24.5 x 16.5cm


Durham Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Durham Castle is of Norman origin, and was built in the 11th century. It stands high upon a hill that is the town's citadel, facing the Cathedral and looking down upon the River Wear. Since 1840 it has been used by Durham University, who run tours for public access.
Ref: TOP 051
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
24.5 x 15.5cm


Lumley Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Lumley Castle was built in 1389 by Sir Ralph Lumley as a remodelling of his manor house. Since then it has served as the seat of the Bishop of Durham, and as accommodation for students at Durham University, but is now a luxury hotel on the outskirts of Chester-le-Street. This print has a little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 129
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18 x 11.5cm


Lumley Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Lumley Castle was built in 1389 by Sir Ralph Lumley as a remodelling of his manor house. Since then it has served as the seat of the Bishop of Durham, and as accommodation for students at Durham University, but is now a luxury hotel on the outskirts of Chester-le-Street. The print has no artist's or engraver's signatures.
Ref: TOP 255
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
31.5 x 19.5cm


Gateshead & Jarrow Monsteries in Durham, Hadleigh Castle & St. Botolph's Priory in Essex, & Ford Abbey & Okehampton Castle in Devon. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This print offers 6 views on one page, of which 2 are of Durham interest. Jarrow Monastery was founded in 681AD - a twin foundation with Monkwearmouth Priory some 7 miles away. It was the home of the Venerable Bede whose writings are an important source for Anglo-Saxon history. The ruins of the monastery are today part of the parish church of St. Paul. Gateshead monastery was mentioned in Bede's writings as being in existence in 623AD. No traces of it survive today, and its site is uncertain, though possibly now occupied by the parish church of St. Mary's. The print is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 256
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
18.5 x 15.5cm


Wanstead House. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Palladian mansion of Wanstead House was built in 1715 by Sir Richard Child, whose ancestors beacame one of the richest families in England. When the male line died out in 1805 the house and vast estates were inherited by 16 year old Catherine Tylney-Long. Catherine unfortunately made a bad marriage and by 1820 her husband had squandered her fortune and run up huge debts. The house was sold in 1822 and shortly afterwards completely demolished and sold piece-meal to pay his creditors. Part of the grounds survive today as a municipal park.
Ref: TOP 128
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
19 x 14.5cm


Netherhall. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Netherhall was a tudor mansion located near Roydon, and the seat of the Colt family. The house was taken down in c1775, but the remains of its large gatehouse survive today. This print was engraved by Eastgate.
Ref: TOP 190
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
19 x 32.5cm


Netherhall. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Netherhall was a tudor mansion located near Roydon, and the seat of the Colt family. The house was taken down in c1775, but the remains of its large gatehouse survive today. This print offers 2 views of the property engraved by Eastgate. It is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 257
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16.5 x 10.5cm


Thorndon Hall. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Thorndon Hall is a Palladian mansion, buily from 1764-70 and located 2 miles south of Brentwood. It was designed by the architect Thomas Paine as the family seat of the Petre family until they moved their seat to Ingatestone House after a major fire at Thorndon in 1878. The house is today converted into private, luxury appartments.
Ref: TOP 258
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
19.5 x 15cm


Bristol. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print has been remargined to the top border where separated from another view on the same sheet. A little marginal foxing which would be mostly hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 112
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 15cm


Thornbury Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Thornbury Castle was built from1511 for the 3rd Duke of Buckingham, Edward Stafford, who was later beheaded by Henry VIII for treason. It is today a luxury hotel. This print was engraved by Richardson, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text. A few spots.
Ref: TOP 259
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
17 x 11cm


Gloucester Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The history og Gloucester Cathedral dates back to 678 AD when the first religious house was founded on the site. The present cathedral was begun in 1089 in Norman style, but has been augmented in other styles since then. It houses the body and shrine of King Edward II. This print was engraved by Thornton.
Ref: TOP 260
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 11cm


The Exchange, Bristol. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Bristol's Exchange was built between 1741 and 1743 by the architect John Wood. It was intended for mercantile use - especially the buying and selling of corn and other commodities. The building still houses a market, with other space being let as offices.
Ref: TOP 261
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 33cm


Portsmouth - The Town and Harbour. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Portsmouth grew in importance as a town and a naval base from the 15th century. This print offers two views on one sheet. A little foxing which could be totally hidden by mounting within the border.
Ref: TOP 083
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 12cm


Portchester Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Portchester Castle stands at the north end of Portsmouth Harbour onthe site of a Roman fort. It was probably built in the late 11th century, but has, since then enjoyed periods of rebuilding, extension and decline, serving both as a royal residence and as a gaol. It is today managed by English Heritage and is open to the public. This print was engraved by Sparrow.
Ref: TOP 264
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
17 x 11.5cm


Odiam Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Odiham Castle was built as a royal residence by King John between 1207 and 1214. From the 15th century onwards it fell into decay, and its ruins are today managed by English Heritage, with public access. This print was engraved by Sparrow.
Ref: TOP 265
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 14.5cm


The Priory of St. Dionysius, Southampton. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Priory of St. Dionysius (also known as St. Denys or St. Denis) was founded by King Henry I in1184. It was situated some 3 miles north of the city centre. After the dissolution of the monasteries decay and stone robbing have meant that only a few fragments of the original priory buildings survive today. This print, engraved by Richardson, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A few ligt spots.
Ref: TOP 266
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
16 x 10.5cm


Winchester Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Winchester Cathedral is of Norman foundation, begun in 1079 and consecrated in 1093, when the adjacent Old Minster which it repaced, was demolished. It is one of the largest cathedrals in the country and houses the tombs of a number of notables, including Saxon Kings, St. Swithun, and Jane Austen. This print was engraved by Thornton and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 267
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16.5 x 11cm


Christchurch Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The site of today's parish church has housed religious buildings since around 800AD. The Normans constructed today's church in the first half of the 12th century. It was originally a secular minster, but became an Augustinian Priory in 1150. After the dissolution of the monasteries most of the monastic buildings were demolished, but the Priory Church survived as the parish church. This print was engraved by Sparrow. A couple of spots to the margin, but otherwise good.
Ref: TOP 268
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 14.5cm


Southampton - The Water Gate. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Watergate was one of 8 gates forming part of the medieval defences of Southampton. The town was attacked and badly damaged by the French in 1338, after which Edward III ordered new walls and defences to be built. The Water Gate was one of these, and still survives, leading from the Norman Castle out onto Town Quay. This print was engraved by Eastgate.
Ref: TOP 269
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 14.5cm


Netley Abbey - The Abbot's Kitchen. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Netley Abbey was a Cistercian monastery founded in 1239 on the shores of Southampton Water. After the dissolution of the monasteries it was converted into a house by Wiiliam Paulet, but declined and fell into decay after 1700. Its ruins are today probably the best preserved Cistercian monastery in the south of England, and are maintained and opened to the public by English Heritage. This print was engraved by Eastgate.
Ref: TOP 271
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
19 x 13cm


Netley Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Netley Abbey was a Cistercian monastery founded in 1239 on the shores of Southampton Water. After the dissolution of the monasteries it was converted into a house by Wiiliam Paulet, but declined and fell into decay after 1700. Its ruins are today probably the best preserved Cistercian monastery in the south of England, and are maintained and opened to the public by English Heritage. These 2 views were engraved by Peltro, and are supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A small spot to the margin.
Ref: TOP 272
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16.5 x 11cm


An Ancient Water Tower in Hampshire. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The location of this water tower is unidentified, but it must have been a notable feature at the time this work was published. The print was engraved by Sparrow - a small brown spot to the margin.
Ref: TOP 274
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
31.5 x 19.5cm


Holy Ghost Chapel, Winchester House, Tichfield House, Hurst Castle (all in Hants.) Ashby de la Zouche Castle (Leics), and St. Mary's Church, Colchester (Essex). The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This anonymous print offers 6 views on one sheet, of which 4 are of Hampshire interest. The ruins of Holy Ghost Chapel, which dates from at least the 13th century, still stand in an ancient cemetary in Basingstoke. Tichfield House, near Fareham, was remodelled from Tichfield Abbey, founded in 1220. By the time of this print the house had been abandoned and was a decaying ruin. It is today maintained by English Heritage and is open to the public. Hurst Castle was built by Henry VIII as one of a chain of forts protecting Southampton. It is also today under the care of English Heritage.
Ref: TOP 275
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 31.5cm


Brompton Brian and Goodrich Castles. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This print, engraved by Lowry, offers two views on one sheet. Brampton Bryan Castle in NW Herefordshire guards the Teme valley route from Ludlow into central Wales. It was first mentioned in Domesday Book. Since 1294 it has been owned by the Harley family, but fell into decay after damage in 2 civil war sieges. Goodrich Castle stands on the River Wye to the south of the county, and dates from the mid 12th century. It was also besieged in the civil war and subsequently sleighted. Its ruins are owned and opened to the public by English Heritage.The print is supplied with the original accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 276
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16.5 x 11cm


Hereford Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Today's Hereford Cathedral was begun in 1079, replacing an earlier church which had occupied the site for around 200 years. Its greatest treasure is probably a 13th century Mappa Mundi (map of the world).
Ref: TOP 277
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
22 x 18cm


Gorhambury House. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print shows Old Gorhambury House, an Elizabethan mansion close to St. Albans. This house was replaced by a new Palladian mansion built between 1777 and 1784, after which the old house was left to decay. Its ruins are today maintained by English Heritage with free public access. The new house survives as the home of the Earl of Verulam. For ease of mounting the print is remargined to the lower border where separated from an adjoing view.
Ref: TOP 117
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
17.5 x 14.5cm


St. Albans Abbey . The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. St. Albans Abbey is believed to have been founded by King Offa II of Mercia in the 8th century, but had to be substantially rebuilt after damage in Danish raids, and the modern building was only completed by its first Norman abbot in1089. After the dissolution of the monasteries the Abbey Church became the town's Parish Church, and later achieved cathedral status in 1877. Much of the stone used to construct the Abbey was robbed from the Roman remains at adjoining Verulamium. This print was engraved by Taylor, and is supplied with the original accompanying text from the work. A few brown spots to the sky.
Ref: TOP 278
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
cm


St. Albans Abbey . The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. St. Albans Abbey is believed to have been founded by King Offa II of Mercia in the 8th century, but had to be substantially rebuilt after damage in Danish raids, and the modern building was only completed by its first Norman abbot in1089. After the dissolution of the monasteries the Abbey Church became the town's Parish Church, and later achieved cathedral status in 1877. Much of the stone used to construct the Abbey was robbed from the Roman remains at adjoining Verulamium. This print offers 2 interior views of the Abbey.
Ref: TOP 305
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
17.5 x 14.5cm


A Canal at Gubbins House. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The More family had owned the manor of Gobions (or Gubbins - near Potters Bar) since the 13th century, and built a new house there in the early 1500's. It was the home of Henry VIII's chancellor, Sir Thomas More. In later years the estate was merged with that of Brookmans Park, and the house was pulled down in c1838. This print was engraved by Taylor, and shows a view of the gardens.
Ref: TOP 279
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17 x 10.5cm


Hitchin Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Hitchin Priory was founded in 1317 as a house for White Carmelite Friars. After the dissolution of the monasteries it was converted into a country house but gradually decayed. A few fragments of the original building survive today, having been incorporated into the fabric of the18th century mansion, now a hotel and known by the name of Hitchin Priory.
Ref: TOP 280
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
12 x 19.5cm


Minsden Chapel, near Hitchin. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Minsden Chapel dates from the 14th century, but was derelict by the 1600's Its overgrown ruins still stand in fields in the parish of Preston, and are today the haunt of ghost hunters.
Ref: TOP 281
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
23 x 33.5cm


Gravesend and Woolwich from the Thames. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers 2 views of north Kent towns from the river. The bottom-left corner of the white margin is missing, but the print would still frame up successfully.
Ref: TOP 097
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
19.5 x 23cm


Foots Cray Place and Hayes Place. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Foots Cray Place, near Sidcup, was built in 1754 for Bourchier Cleve. The property was ravaged by fire in 1949, and demolished the following year. Hayes Place was the home of the elder and younger Pitt, who both became Prime Minister. The property was bought by Pitt the elder in 1754 and remodelled. Later owners demolished the house in 1933 for redevelopment. The print was a waterstain to the top-right border, and some marginal foxing. Both faults would be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 121
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
23 x 34.5cm


Chelsea from Battersea & the Thames at Northfleet. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers two views, both featuring the River Thames. Narrow right-hand margin.
Ref: TOP 098
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22 x 17cm


Canterbury. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Some foxing and worm holes to the margins of the print, which could be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 144
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
17 x 31.5cm


Strangers' Hall, Christ Church Priory, Canterbury. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Christ Church Priory was a Benedictine foundation added to Canterbury Cathedral in the late 10th century. This print was engraved by Coote.
Ref: TOP 284
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
19 x 30cm


Barfreston Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Barfreston is a small village between Canterbury and Dover, which has as its parish church, one of the best preserved Norman churches in England. It dates from the 12th century, and is too small to have its own belltower, this difficiency being remedied by hanging the bell ina nearby yew tree and ringing it from within the church by a series of levers. This print was engraved by Peltre.
Ref: TOP 285
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
19 x 31.5cm


The Grand Door of Barfreston Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Barfreston is a small village between Canterbury and Dover, which has as its parish church, one of the best preserved Norman churches in England. It dates from the 12th century, and is too small to have its own belltower, this difficiency being remedied by hanging the bell ina nearby yew tree and ringing it from within the church by a series of levers. This print was engraved by Peltre.
Ref: TOP 286
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
18 x 33.5cm


Dover Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Dover Castle stands on a site used by the pre-Roman Belgic tribe and by the Romans themselves, who buily a lighthouse there, the remains of which can still be seen. A wood castle was built there by William the Conqueror, which was rebuilt in stone and extended in the 12th century. Having successfully survived the civil war intact, the castle was further extended and refortified in the late 1700's in fear of a Naploeonic invasion which never came. In World War ii it was an important command centre. Today the site is owned by English Heritage with public access. This print offers two views engraved by Lowry, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 287
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 14.5cm


Canterbury Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. A moote and bailey castle was built in Canterbury by William the Conqueror soon after the Norman invasion. This was replaced by a new castle in stone on a nearby site, built between 1100 and 1135. The remains - mostly the keep - are today owned by the local authority and open to the public. This print, engraved by Goldar, is supplied with the original accompanying text page and plan of the castle from the work. A couple of spots.
Ref: TOP 293
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 32.5cm


Canterbury - St. Augustine's Monastery & the City Walls. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. St. Augustine's Abbey was a Benedictine foundation dating back to 598 AD. After the dissolution of the monasteries it fell into decay. Part of the surviving ruins were incorporated into King's College School, with the other remains maintained by English Heritage who open them to the public. Canterbury's city walls rest on Roman foundations, and were rebuilt with new stone between c1378 and 1405, with 24 towers and 6 gates. Today only Westgate and about half the original length of the walls survives, much of which can be walked. This print, engraved by Goldar, offers 2 views, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text and a plan of the monastery.
Ref: TOP 298
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 32cm


St. Martin's Priory, Dover. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. St. Martin's Priory was a religious house of 22 canons founded in the early 7th century on a different site (today the Parish church). A new priory was built for the order between 1131 and 1140 on the site of the modern Dover Priory Railway Station. The monastery decayed after the dissolution by Henry VIII. Part of the ruins were demolished by the building of the station in the 1860's and part were incorporated into Dover College, which opened in 1871. This print, engraved by Lowry, offers 2 views on one sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text. A few spots to the margins.
Ref: TOP 291
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
19 x 14.5cm


Bradsole Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. St. Radigund's Abbey at Bradsole was founded in 1191 as a Premonstratensian religious house, a few miles from Dover. Today the gateway is still mostly intact, and a few other surviving ruins have been incorporated into the farmhouse which occupies the site. This print was engraved by Goldar. A few light, marginal spots.
Ref: TOP 292
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 31.5cm


Halling House and Ket's Coity House, near Rochester.. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Halling House was first built in 1077 as a Palace for the Bishop of Rochester, being subject torebuilds in 1184 and the 1320's. It later fell into disrepair. Many of the ruins were demilished in the 18th century, with the Hall being converted to a dwelling house. The few surviving ruins were restored in 1983. Ket's (or Kit's) Coity House is a neolithic, chambered, long barrow, used for burials. It still stands today on Blue Bell Hill near Aylesford, with free public access to the site, now maintained by English Heritage. This print, engraved by Lowry, offers 2 views, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text. A couple of spots to the lower margin.
Ref: TOP 294
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 15cm


St. Mary's and All Saints' College, Maidstone. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. St. Mary's and All Saints is today the parish church of Maidstone. It was built bewteen 1396-8, and is one of the finest perpendicular churches in the country. It was founded together with an ecclesiatical college which closed in 1546. Part of the college buildings were demolished in the 19th century, but some important buildings remain and are today owned by Maidstone Borough Council. This print, engraved by Taylor, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 295
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 15cm


Saltwood Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Saltwood Castle, just outside Hythe, is recorded as dating from 488 when it was first built by Aesc, King of Kent. It was passed to the ownership of the church in 1026. It was rebuilt in stone by the Normans in the 12th and succeeding centuries. It still stands today as the private, family home of the Clark family. This print, engraved by Taylor, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 296
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1797-9
£7
16 x 10cm


Foots-Cray Place, Sidcup. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Foots Cray Place, near Sidcup, was a Palladian mansion built in 1754 for Bourchier Cleve. The property was ravaged by fire in 1949, and demolished the following year.
Ref: TOP 299
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
19.5 x 11cm


Upnor Castle, Chatham. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Upnor Castle was built in 1559-64 as an artillery fort on the River Medway, intended to protect the dockyards at Chatham and the fleet moored on the river. It was further stengthened and modified in 1599-1601. The fort remained in military occupation until 1945. It is now owned by English Heritage, and is open to the public. This anonymous print is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 300
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
31.5 x 19.5cm


Lyme Castle, Leighbourn Castle, Leeds, Castle, the Old Church at Dover Castle, Faversham Abbey, & the Mote Bulwark at Dover.. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This anonymous print offers 6 views on 1 sheet, all of Kentish interest, and is supplied with the original accompanying text pages from the work.
Ref: TOP 301
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
31.5 x 19.5cm


Chilham, Allingham and Cowling Castles, Davynton and Dartford Priories, and the Chiding Stone, near Tonbridge. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This anonymous print offers 6 views on 1 sheet, all of Kentish interest, and is supplied with the original accompanying text pages from the work.
Ref: TOP 302
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
23 x 34.5cm


Leicester and Lincoln. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers views of two East Midlands cities. Both were important Roman towns, built on or near the sites of earlier tribal capitals. Leicester's Roman name was Ratae Coritanorum, and Lincoln's was Lindum Colonia. The 2 views could be separated and separately mounted, as indicated by the images.
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
17.5 x 31cm


Lambeth Palace & Westminster Abbey and St. Margaret's Church. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Lambeth Palace sits on the south bank of the Thames, and is the London residence of the Archbishop of London. The complex has been rebuilt and extended over the centuries, with the earliest surviving part being Lollards Tower, dating from 1435-40. The first Westminster Abbey was founded by Edward the Confessor, but the present building was begun in 1245, with work continuing until 1517. The two western towers were addded by Hawksmoor between 1722 and 1745. The Abbey has been used for all royal coronations since 1066. This print, engraved by Taylor, offers two views on one sheet. Some marginal foxing and a nick to the lower margin would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 102
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
23 x 34.5cm


Mortlake and Hammersmith from the Thames. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print is the ideal present for a fan of the University Boat Race offering views of the mid-way and finishing points of the race. Narrow right-hand margin, but enough to mount successfully. A little browning affecting the lower-right margin.
Ref: TOP 101
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
27 x 17.5cm


The Thames and the stairs at York Buildings, London. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print is taken from the spot where York House, one of the great Thameside Mansions on the Strnad once stood. The watermen's stairs known as York stairs were build to an elaboarte Italianate design around 1626, and still survive, though now located in the Embankment Gardens some way away from the river. At the time they were built York House was owned by The de Vililers family, Dukes of Buckingham. The second Duke sold the house for redevelopment in 1672, and the new buildings on the site were collectively called York Buildings. A little marginal foxing to the print would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 099
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22 x 34cm


The Bishop of London's seat at Fulham, & Lord Stormont's House, Wandsworth. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Fulham Palace was the residence of the Bishops of London from the early 8th century. In 1973 the Bishop's seat was relocated and the old palace became a museum, with its grounds now used as a botanic garden and allotments. The Lord Stormont here referred to was the 7th Viscount Stormont, David Murray. The family seat was at scone, but Murry needed a residence near London to pursue his political career, and chose this viilla on Wandsworth Hill, probably leased from Lady Rivers. He later became the Earl of Mansfield in 1793, inheriting Kenwood House. Two prints on one sheet. A little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 092
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
21.5 x 32cm


Gunnersbury House, Wanstead House, and a detail from Bethlehem Hospital. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers 3 views. Gunnersbury House was a Palladian mansion in Brentwood built sometime prior to 1742 for John Maynard. The house shown here was demolished in 1801, when the estate was sold and split into two, resulting in its replacement by 2 new houses. These still stand in Gunnersbury Park. Wanstead House was another Palladian mansion, completed 1722 for Sir Richard Child. It was demolished in 1825 when the site was sold to pay the gambling debts of the then owner William Wellesley-Pole. Bethlehem (or Bedlam) Hospital dates back to a foundation of 1347, and is Europe's oldest psychiatric hospital. At the time of this print (which shows a detail from the gateway) it occupied an impressive building in Moorfields which had opened in 1676. The hospital moved to a new site in Southwark in 1815. A little marginal worming and foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 090
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
18.5 x 32.5cm


Sion House & Kenwood House. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Syon House was built in the mid 16th century for the Duke of Somerset, being subsequently acquired by the Percy Family, Dukes of Northumberland, in1594. It continues as the family's residence today, and is open to the public. Kenwood (originally Caen Wood) House in Hampstead was built in the early 17th century, and in 1754 was acquired by William Murray, Ist Earl Mansfield, who engaged Robert Adam to remodel and add to it in the 1760's and 70's. In 1925 it was purchaed by Lord Iveagh who gave it to the nation 2 years later, and it is today administered by English Hertitage who open it to the public. Two views on one print. A light stain to the lower title.
Ref: TOP 091
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1764
£10
22.5 34cm


Kensington Palace, Ranelagh & Vauxhall Gardens. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Kensington Palace was built c1605 as a Jacobean mansion. It was bought by King William IV and Quenn Mary II in 1689, was remodelled and extended by Wren and became the main royal residence in London until 1860, since when it has been the home of junior and lesser members of the royal family. Vauxhall and Ranelaugh were London's two great "Pleasure Gardens", offering a garden walks, food and drink and a range of entertainments, including musical concerts in rotundas. They were popular venues for assignations between the sexes. Vauxhall opened to the public in c1660 and Ranelaugh in1742. Thier heyday was the 18th century, with both being closed by the mid 1800's. Both survive as garden - at least in part - as a public park in Vauxhall, and Ranelagh as the site of the Chelsea flower show. This print offers 3 views on one sheet. A little marginal foxing which could be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 088
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
23 x 34.5cm


Chelsea from Battersea & The Thames, near Northfleet. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Two "London" based views of the Thames. At the time of this print Chelsea was still a village, and would not be joined to the growing metropolis for another 60 years or so. Northfleet was of importance for its dockyards, with a number of shipyards building large vessels for commercial companies such as the East India company. A narrow right-hand margin, but sufficient for mounting.
Ref: TOP 098
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
21.5 x 17cm


The Duke of Chando's Seat at Southgate. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Duke of Chandos residence was Minchenden House in Southgate, now a London Borough, but then a village. The house was built some little time after 1664 for Sir Thomas Wolstenholme, with alterations in 1738 by a later owner, John Nicholl. Nicholl's daughter married James Bridges who subsequently became the 3rd Duke of Chandos, and the house was owned by him at the time this print was taken.. It later fell into disrepair, and was sold and demolished in 1853. This print has been re-margined to the lower border where separated from another view on the same sheet. A liitle marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 089
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1764
£7
22.5 x 34.5cm


The Churches of St Pancras and Hornsey. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print shows the Old St. Pancras Church, which probably dates back to the 11th or 12th centuries, though most of its fabric is later. It ceased to be the parish church in 1822, when replaced by the New St. Pancras church on Euston Road. It was much restored and remodelled in the mid 19th century and continues as a place of worship today. St. Mary's Chruch in the village of Hornsey (now north London) dates from the 13th century. Althougn replaced as parish church by 2 later builds, it has survived both and continues in use today. This print offers views of both churches. A little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 103
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
35.5 x 21cm


Chiswick Gardens and the Serpentine River. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The first Chiswick house was a Jacobean house built in 1610. By the 1700's the property was owned by Lord Burlington who built a new Palladian Villa, and from about 1720 developed the gardens with William Kent and other architects. Both house and gardens were modelled on Roman exemplars. The Jacobean house was demolished in 1788. The Villa and gardens have been restored in recent years and survive today under a Trust. They are administered and opened to the public by English Heritage. The gardens are free of charge.
Ref: TOP 104
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
24 x 14.5cm


The Duke of Argyll's house at Whitton. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. In 1722 Archibald Campbell, later to become the 3rd Duke of Argyll, bought 40 acres on Hounslow Heath adjoining the hamlet of Whitton. From c1732-5 he built there a Palladian Villa to a design by Roger Morris who oversaw the build. The house was known as Whitton Place and was accompanied by substantial gardens.in the late 1840's the villa was demolished and the estate was sold, much of it being developed for housing in the 20th century.
Ref: TOP 151
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22.5 x 34cm


Hampton Court & Chertsey. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Hampton Court was constructed by Cardinal Wolsey in c1514, and passed to Henry VIII on the cardinal's fall from power in 1529. Under William and Mary the palace underwent massive extension in the Baroque style between 1688 and 1694. It is today managed by "Historic Royal Palaces" and open to the public. Chertsey is a very old town which grew up around Chertsey Abbey, founded in 666 AD.It became a Thames crossing of importance, but at the time of this print was possibly most famous for its cricket team who in 1778 heavily defeated a side representing "the rest of England". A narrow right-hand margin, but sufficient to mount, thus also hiding a few marginal spots.
Ref: TOP 154
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales 1787-9
£8
22.5 x 32.5cm


The Royal Exchange. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Royal Exchange, on Cornhill, was built at the instigation of Sir Thomas Gresham and opened in 1571. Its function was as a centre for trade and commerce, its primary occupants being London merchants. The Exchange was twice destroyed by fire and rebuillt. This print, engraved by A. Walker after a drawing by S. Donowell, illustrates the second building of 1669, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work..
Ref: TOP 310
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£20
35.5 x 23.5cm


The Gates to the City of London. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The walls of the city of London had 8 gates, built at different periods of time. By the mid 18th century, as defensive needs reduced and the city grew, they were seen as obstructions to traffic and some had already been demolished. In 1760 an Act was passed allowing the remaining gates to be pulled down, and all had gone by 1771. This print, engraved by Wooding, is supplied with the original, accompanying text. Some foxing.
Ref: TOP 311
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales 1787-9
£10
16.5 x 29cm


Old St. Paul's Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The old cathedral of St. Paul was built between 1087 and 1314, on a site which had housed 3 previous churches. It was destroyed in the great fire of London in 1666, and subsequently rebuilt in Baroque style to a design of Sir Christopher Wren, the new building being completed in 1708. The cathedral is the seat of the Bishop of London. This print offers 3 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A couple of light spots.
Ref: TOP 312
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£15
29.5 x 22.5cm


The Bridges of London. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. For many years London had only one bridge - London Bridge - linking the city with the borough of Southwark on the Surrey bank of the Thames. As the city and Southwark both grew, new bridges were built to accommodate the growing traffic, and by the time of this anonymous print there were the four bridges shown. The print is supplied with the original, accompanying text pages from the work.
Ref: TOP 313
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
21 x 32.5cm


Cheapside and Baynards Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. At the time of this print Cheapside was the site of a major produce market and an important thoroughfare linking the City of London with Westminster. Cheapside actually means "market place". The first post-conquest Norman Baynards Castle was built by Ralph Baynard on a riverfront site to the east of the modern Blackfriars Bridge. It was demolished in 1213, and in 1276 the site became part of Blackfriars Priory. In the late medieval period a new mansion gradually evolved on a close-by site, now owned by the Dukes of York, which also became known as Baynard Castle. In turn this became the royal palace of Henry Vii and Henry VIII before passing to the Dukes of Pembroke and later the Dukes of Shrewsbury. The house was destroyed in the great fire of London in 1666, though some substantial ruins survived to be incorporated into later wharfs and timberyards. The site is now occupied by a BT office block. This print offers 2 views engrved by Wooding, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 314
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
17 x 32.5cm


Lambeth Palace and Westminster Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Lambeth Palace sits on the south bank of the Thames, and is the London residence of the Archbishop of London. The complex has been rebuilt and extended over the centuries, with the earliest surviving part being Lollards Tower, dating from 1435-40. The first Westminster Abbey was founded by Edward the Confessor, but the present building was begun in 1245, with work continuing until 1517. The two western towers were addded by Hawksmoor between 1722 and 1745. The Abbey has been used for all royal coronations since 1066. This print, engraved by Taylor, offers two views on one sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 315
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18 x 32.5cm


Sion House and Kenwood House. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. yon House was built in the mid 16th century for the Duke of Somerset, being subsequently acquired by the Percy Family, Dukes of Northumberland, in1594. It continues as the family's residence today, and is open to the public. Kenwood (originally Caen Wood) House in Hampstead was built in the early 17th century, and in 1754 was acquired by William Murray, Ist Earl Mansfield, who engaged Robert Adam to remodel and add to it in the 1760's and 70's. In 1925 it was purchaed by Lord Iveagh who gave it to the nation 2 years later, and it is today administered by English Hertitage who open it to the public. Two views on one page, engraved by Roberts, and supplied with the original,accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 316
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales 11787-9
£15
33 x 21.5cm


An Ancient View of St. James.s Palace, Westminster Abbey and Hall from Charing Cross. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The title of this print describes an "Ancient View", so the idyllic view of Westminster across the fields, probably looked a little different by the 1780's. The oldest building on view is Westminster Hall built 1097-99, as part of the royal Palace of Westminster, and today part of the Houses of Parliament. Next oldest is Westminster Abbey where construction began in 1245, with work continuing until 1517. St. James's Palce was built by Henry VIII from 1531-6, and was the residence of the sovereign until George III moved to York House (today's Buckingham Palace) in 1862. It remians home to other members of the royal family. The print is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 317
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18 x 32.5cm


St. John's Gate, Clerkenwell. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. St. John's gate was built in 1504 as the southern gateway to the Priory of the Knights of St. John, as is the only sizeable remnant to have survived the dissolution of the monasteries. It still stands today as the museum of the revived Order of St. John, best known for the ambulance service they sponsor. This print, engraved by Peltro, offers two views of the gate on one page, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 319
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
20 x 12cm


The Charter House (Charterhouse School). The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. In 1371 a Carthusian Priory was founded just to north of Chaterhouse Square, Smithfield. Most of the monastery was demolished after the dissolution, but in 1515 the site was bought by Sir Edward North who built a large mansion there. In 1611 this property was acquired by Thomas Sutton whose will left funding for its use as a Chapel, Almshouses and School. Charterhouse School is today famous, but relocated to new premises near Godalming in 1872. The rest of the Smithfield buildings are still used as almshouses for 40 pensioners. This anonymous print of the Charterhouse is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 318
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
31.5 x 19.5cm


Chepstow Castle, Tintern Abbey, Hampton Court & Ely House (Middlesex), & Bothall Castle & Brinkburn Priory (both Northumberland). The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This anonymous print offers 6 views on one sheet, including 2 of Monmouthshire interest. Chepstow Castle was built in stone by the Norman Baron William FitzOsbern, beginning in 1067. It was one of a string of such castles defending the Welsh Marches. It stands on a cliff overlooking the River Wye. In the 16th century, with peace along the border, it was remodelled as a more comfortable Tudor mansion, but fell into decay from c1682. Under new ownership it was restored in the 20th century, and is now maintained by Cadw (the Welsh equivalent of English Heritage) who open it to the public. The Cictercian Abbey at Tintern was founded in 1131 by Walter de Clare. It fell into decay after the dissultion of the monasteries, but became the haunt of Romantic tourism from c 1780. It has been immortalised in verse by Wordsworth and in paint by Turner. The ruins are today maintained by Cadw and open to the public.
Ref: TOP 320
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
24 x 17cm


Norwich Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Norwich Castle was founded by William the conqueror and built from 1066-75. The keep was rebuilt in stone from 1095-1110. The castle was used as a gaol from 1220 to 1887, when it was bought by the city corporation and opened as a museum in 1895. It still serves as the city's museum and art gallery today.
Ref: TOP 081
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
18 x 32cm


Castle Acre - the Castle and Monastery . The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The village of Castle Acre grew up around the castle from which it takes its name. The castle was founded by William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, soon after the Norman conquest. The Cluniac Priory was built in the castle grounds and consecrated between 1146 and 1148. The remains of both properties are today owned by the Earl of Leicester, but managed and opened to the public by English Heritage. This print, engraved by J. Wooding, offers views of both castle and priory, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 321
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 14.5cm


Castle Acre Monastery . The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Cluniac Priory was built in the grounds of the castle of Castle Acre, and was consecrated between 1148 and 1148. After the dissolution of the monasteries the priory fell into decay, eventually passing into the hands of the Earls of Leicester, who still own the site today. The ruins of both the priory and the castle are managed by English Heritage and open to the public.
Ref: TOP 322
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-89
£8
16 x 11cm


Norwich Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The building of Norwich Cathedral began in 1096 and was completed in 1145. Its origianl wooden spire was rebuilt in stone in 1480, but, compared to many other cathedrals, Norwich's Norman plan and fabric is little changed today. This print, engraved by Thornton, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 323
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
23 x 35.5cm


Castle Ashby & Sponne Gate, Coventry & East Gate, Chester. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print offers 3 views. Castle Ashby is the ancestral home of the Compton family, built on lands given to the family in 1512. In 1574 Lord Compton demolished the old 13th century castle on the estate to build the present house, still standing today and occupied by the present Earl Compton. The gardens and grounds were, in part, designed by Lancelot "Capability" Brown, and are open to the public. Spon gate was one of the 12 gates in Coventry's defensive walls, constructed in the 14th century. It was demolished in the late 18th century. Chester's East gate, stands on the site of one of the 4 original gates into the Roman Legionary Fortress which occupied the site. The present gate was built in 1768, with its clock added in 1899. The print has narrow vertical margins and a nick to the upper-left border, but would mount-up successfully.
Ref: TOP 153
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
24.5 x 16.5cm


Daventry Priory. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Daventry's Cluniac Priory was origianlly founded in Preston Capes, with 4 monks, but shortly afterwards removed to Daventry. It was dissolved by Henry VIII in 1525, and the site given to what is now Christ Church College, Oxford.The Priory church became the town's Parish Church, until the late 18th century, when it was replaced by today's parish church.
Ref: TOP 080
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Boughton Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The village of Boughton lies 4 miles to the north of Northampton's town centre, being today a suburb of the town. The church illustrated in this print, engraved by Peltro, is the Old Church of St. John, which was a picturesque ruin at the time this print was taken, its tower and spire standing a few years longer until c1785. A few fragments may still be found to the north of the village green. The Old Church was replaced as the parish church by what had hitherto been the Chapel of St. John the Baptist, dating from c1350. It has been much extended since then and still serves the parish.
Ref: TOP 324
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 14.5cm


St. Sepulchre's Church, Northampton. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is one of only 4 surviving round churches in the country. It was founded in the early 12th century by Simon de Senlis, and is probably modelled on the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem (which de Senlis is likely to have visited when he took part in the first crusade). The original short nave was later extended and a chancel and aisles were added. The church was extensively restored in the 19th century by George Gilbert Scott. This print, engraved by Wooding, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 325
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
16 x 10.5cm


Peterborough Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The origins of Peterborough Cathedral go back to 655 AD the date of its first monastic foundation. The current building, however, was begun in 1118 in the Norman style. Its walls were up by 1193, though it was not until 1250 that the elaborate ceiling was finished. The tower was rebuilt in Gothic style between 1350 and 1380. After the dissolution of the monasteries the church became a cathedral and seat of the Bishop of Peterborough. It houses the tomb of Catherine of Aragon, the first queen of Henry VIII. This print was engraved by Hogg.
Ref: TOP 326
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales 1787-9
£8
19 x 11.5cm


Tinmouth (Tynemouth) Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Tynemouth Castle originated as a Benedictine Priory where the Kings of Northumbria were buried. The Anglo-Saxon monastery was destroyed by the Danes, but refounded in 1090. Stone defensive walls were added in1296, and a gatehouse and barbican in in 1390. After the dissolution of the monasteries the Priory Church was retained to serve the parish until it was replaced in 1668. The remaining ruins are now maintained by English Heritage and open to the public.
Ref: TOP 327
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18 x 14.5cm


Monastery of the Black Friars, Newcastle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The order of Dominicans (The Blackfriars) founded their friary in Newcastle in 1239. It is sited to the NW of the city centre just within the city walls. Upon the dissolution of the monasteries, most of the buildings were demolished and the site passed to the city Corporation, who in 1552 leased out the remaining cloister buildings to the city's craft guilds. With the decline of the guilds the buildings fell into disrepair. They were restored by the Corporation between 1973 and 81, and are now leased out as craft workshops and a restaurant, though the Tanners Guild also still meet there. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 328
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
19 x 14.5cm


Dunstanbrough (Dunstanburgh) Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The castle was bulit by Thomas Earl of Lancaster as a stronghold against King Edward II, construction beginning in 1313. The Earl was, however captured and executed following a rebellion against the king, and his castle passed to John of Gaunt who further strengthened it against Scottish incursions. It endured two sieges during the wars of the Roses, but subsequently fell into disrepair and decay. The impressive remains are today under the guardianship of English Heritage, and are open to the public.This print was engraved by Hawkins.
Ref: TOP 613
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
19 x 14.5cm


Mitford Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Mitford Castle dates from the late 11th century, and had a number of owners before it was destroyed in the early 14th century, possibly by the Scots. Much of its stone was used to build a Jacoberan Mansion, but the remaining, imposing ruins still stand on a hill overlooking the small town of Mitford, near Morpeth. Its current owners are conserving and restoring the remains with grant aid from English Heritage. This print, engraved by Roberts, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A few spots.
Ref: TOP 330
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
19 x 14.5cm


Gate at Tynemouth Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Tynemouth Castle originated as a Benedictine Priory where the Kings of Northumbria were buried. The Anglo-Saxon monastery was destroyed by the Danes, but refounded in 1090. Stone defensive walls were added in1296, and a gatehouse and barbican in in 1390. After the dissolution of the monasteries the Priory Church was retained to serve the parish until it was replaced in 1668. The remaining ruins are now maintained by English Heritage and open to the public. This print was engraved by Grainger. A little foxing.
Ref: TOP 332
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
18.5 x 32cm


Tynemouth Castle and Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Tynemouth Castle originated as a Benedictine Priory where the Kings of Northumbria were buried. The Anglo-Saxon monastery was destroyed by the Danes, but refounded in 1090. Stone defensive walls were added in1296, and a gatehouse and barbican in in 1390. After the dissolution of the monasteries the Priory Church was retained to serve the parish until it was replaced in 1668. The remaining ruins are now maintained by English Heritage and open to the public. This print, engraved by Walker, offers 2 views on one sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 333
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales 1787-9
£8
19 x 14cm


The Monks Stone, near Tinmouth (Tynemouth). The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Monks' Stone originally stood in a field in the village of Preston, near North Shields, and was probably a boundary marker for nearby Tynemouth Priory. The stone bears a (probably later) inscription commemorating a murder, which may be a reference to a story of an incident between one of the monks and Lord Deveral. The stone has now been relocated to the grounds of the Priory where it may stilll be seen. This print was engraved by Peltro. A little spotting.
Ref: TOP 334
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 32cm


Lindisfarne Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The island of Lindisfarne (or Holy Island) lies 1 mile off the north Northumbrian coast, and joined to the mainland at low tide.A Priory was founded there by St. Aidan in 634 AD, and which under St. Cuthbert became a leading centre for learning and the Christian faith, producing such works as the still surviving Lindisfarne Gospels. The monks fled the island in 878 after attacks by the Vikings and Danes, but the Priory was re-established in 1093, and continued until the dissolution of the monasteries, after which the buildings decayed. The ruins are today in the care of English Heritage and open to the public. This print, engraved by Wooding, offers 2 views on one sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A couple of light spots.
Ref: TOP 335
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Holy Island. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The island of Lindisfarne (or Holy Island) lies 1 mile off the north Northumbrian coast, and joined to the mainland at low tide.It has two notable buildings - a Priory and a Castle. The Priory was founded there by St. Aidan in 634 AD, and under St. Cuthbert became a leading centre for learning and the Christian faith, producing such works as the still surviving Lindisfarne Gospels. The monks fled the island in 878 after attacks by the Vikings and Danes, but the Priory was re-established in 1093, and continued until the dissolution of the monasteries, after which the buildings decayed. The ruins are today in the care of English Heritage and open to the public. The Castle was built in the mid 16th century as part of the coastal defences against the Scots. In 1901 it was bought by Edward Hudson, who employed Lutyens to refurnish it in the Arts and Crafts style. It is today maintained by the National Trust and opened to the public. This print, engraved by Peltro, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 336
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 31.5cm


Hulne Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Hulne Abbey was a Carmelite Priory founded in 1240 near Alnwick. After the dissolution of the monasteries the site passed to the Percy Family, Dukes of Northumberland. It is still owned by them and the substantial ruins in what is now Hulne Park are open to the public (pedestrians only). This print , engraved by Peltro, offers 2 views on one sheet, and is supplied with the original text from the work. A little marred by foxing.
Ref: TOP 337
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 15cm


Alnwick Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Alnwick Abbey was founded in 1147 by the Premonstratensian order of monks. After the dissolution of the Monasteries the site eventually passed to the Dukes of Northumberland. Today only the impressive gatehouse remains above ground, standing In Hulne Park. The Park is open to pedestrians. This print, engraved by Peltro, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 338
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales 1787-9
£10
18 x 14.5cm


Bamborough (Bamburgh) Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Bamburgh's Norman castle was built soon after the conquest. It stood by 1095 and became a property of the crown soon after, and its defences were extended and strengthened over the following years. Around 1300 it passed again into private hands, and had a succession of different owners until it was bought in the late 19th century by William Armstrong, who restored it. It is today still owned and inhabited by the Armstrong family who open it to the public. This print, engraved by Thornton, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 339
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 31.5cm


Newstead Abbey & Ruins in Nottingham Park. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Newstead Abbey was founded in 165 as an Augustinian Priory. After the dissolution of the monasteries the site passed to the Byron family in 1540, and was converted to a country house. By the time it was inherited by Lord Byron, the estate and house was much declined, and financial problems forced him to sell it in 1818. It is today owned by Nottingham Corporation who open it to the public. The "Ruins" described in the print, are part of Nottingham's system of over 500 caves, cut into the sandstone underlying the city. The earliest of the caves date back to to the late 13th century, and over the years they have served as cellars, a tannery, homes and air-raid shelters. Today some are open as a visitor attraction under the title "City of Caves". This print, engraved by Roberts, offers two views and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 341
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
19 x 12.5cm


Blenheim Palace, Woodstock. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The construction of Blenheim Palace began in 1705, on land gifted to John Churchil, Duke of Marlborough, by a grateful nation in recognition of his victory at the Battle of Blenheim during the War of the Spanish Succession. Parliament voted funding for the build to which the Duke also contributed. The architect was Sir John Vanburgh and the house was mostly completed by 1725, in the English Baroque style. Quarrels between the Royal House household and the Marlboroughs, and between the Dutchess and the Architect contributed to the delay, causing disruptions to the flow of funding. The house remains the seats of the Dukes of Marlborough today, and is open to the public. This print has been remargined to the top border, where separated from an adjoining view.
Ref: TOP 120
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Friar Bacon's Study, Oxford.. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Friar Bacon's Study (or Tower) was a 3 story building straddling the north end of South or Folly Bridge, carrying the main Oxford-Abingdon road across the Thames. It was lived and worked in by the 13th century alchemist Roger Bacon, but demolished in 1779 to allow for road widening. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 343
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Banbury Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Church illustrated is the old parish church, dedicated to St. Mary the Virgin. It dated from from 12th century, but its mid 15th century tower was too heavy and contributed to structural problems, exacerbated by civil war damage.. By the mid 18th century these problems were so great that it was decided to replace the building. In 1797 it was pulled down and replaced by the present parish church. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 344
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Godstow Nunnery. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Godstow Nunnery was a Benedictine Abbey dating from 1139 when the Abbey Church was consecrated. It became famous as the resting place of Rosamund Clifford, mistress of Henry II, but after the dissolution of the monasteries was converted to a private house. Severe damage in the civil war resulted in its subsequent decay and abandonment. Its ruins can still, however, be visited on the banks of the Thames about 2.5 miles from the centre of Oxford. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 345
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Beaumont Palace, Oxford. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Beaumont Paace was built by Henry I around 1130 as a royal residence. It stood just outside the north gate of Oxford. In 1318 it became a religious house after being gifted to the Carmelite order by Edward I. After the dissolution of the monasteries it was mostly dismantled and its stone re-used by the colleges of Christ Church and St. Johns. The remaining ruins shown in this print were destroyed in the building of today's Beaumont Street. The print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 346
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 16cm


Oxford Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The first castle in Oxford was built by Baron Robert D'Oyly between 1071 and 1073. By the mid 12th century it had been extended and rebuilt in stone. Over the years it has seen many changes, being used as a family stronghold, a prison, an administrative centre, and a couthouse. Much of the medieval castle was lost in alterations made during the civil war, and the keep was demolished in the early 18th century, as the site was gradually redeveloped. The main use was as a gaol, although the prison finally closed in 1996. The site is now mixed use, housing a hotel, restaurant, offices, and heritage attractions which continue to show what remains of the medieval castle. This print, engraved by Eastgate, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A few spots.
Ref: TOP 347
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 32cm


The Chapel & Old Kitchin at Stanton Harcourt. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Manor House at Stanton Harcourt, 6 miles west of Oxford, was built by the Harcourt family in medieval times. In 1688 it ceased to be the family's main residence and fell gradually into disrepair. It was mostly demolished in the mid 18th century, leaving the chapel, kitchen, gatehouse and some other features as picturesque ruins by the time this print was taken. The gatehouse was extended and refurbished in the 19th and 20th centuries, and is occupied today as a private residence. The site is still family owned.This print, engraved by Noble, offers 2 views on one sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 348
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Grace Dieu Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Grace Dieu Priory, near Thringstone in NW Leicestershire, was founded as an Augustinian Priory by Roesia de Verdon around 1235-41. After the dissolution of the monasteries it was converted to a private residence, before most of the buildings on the site were demolished in the late 17th century. The ruins of the Priory still survive in private ownership. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 351
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
18.5 x 14.5cm


Oakham Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Oakham Castle was built between 1180 and 1190 for the Lord of the Manor, Walchelin de Ferriers. Although designated a castle, a better description of the property is probably a fortified Manor House, of which today only the great hall survives - an excellent example of its type. The hall is famouse for its collection of decorative horseshoes presented by visiting royalty and other dignitaries. The site is today owned by Rutland County Council, with free public access. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 352
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 11.5cm


Shrewsbury Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Shrewsbury Castle is of Norman origin, being constructed by Roger de Montgomery in c1070. Much of the original structure was demolished and rebuilt around 1300. From 1663 it served as a private residence, until it was bought and gifted to the Corporation of Shrewsbury in 1924. Today it houses the Regimental Museum of the King's Shropshire Light Infantry, and is open to the public. This print was engraved by Lowry. A few spots.
Ref: TOP 353
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-89
£8
17.5 x 11cm


The Iron Bridge and River Severn, Coalbrookdale. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. In the 18th century Ironbridge Gorge became the cradle of the industrial revolution, thanks to technological advances and local raw materials such as iron ore. Today this heritage is marked by its designation as a World Heritage site. The famous Iron Bridge was opened in 1781, and was the first arched bridge in the world to be made of cast iron. It still spans the River Severn today, though it is now for the use of pedestrians only, and Grade 1 listed. This print was engraved by W.K.J. Walker.
Ref: TOP 354
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-89
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Acton Burnell Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The village of Acton Birnell is 9 miles SE of Shrewsbury. By 1283 it contained a Manor House belonging to Robert Burnell, Bishop of Bath and Wells, and was the site of an early Parliament convened by King Edward I. From 1284-93, the house was fortified by licence of the King. Over succeeding centuries the property passed through the hands of several families, but fell gradually into decay, and many of the buildings had been demolished by c1650. The ruins of the manor house, and gables of its great barn still survive in the care of English Heritage, who provide access without charge. This print was engraved by Eastgate. A few light spots.
Ref: TOP 355
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 15cm


Halesowen Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Halesowen Abbey is situtated in what was until 1844 an outlying portion of the county of Shropshire. It was founded in1215 as a Premonstratension house. After the dissolution of the monasteries the site was allowed to decay and many of its buildings were robbed for their stone, with some parts of the site incorporated into the outbuildings of Manor Farm in the 18th century. Today the ruins are maintained by English Heritage with free public access. This print was engraved by Noble, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 356
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
19.5 x 16.5cm


The City of Bath. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Bath was a well known spa town in Roman times, and the original Roman baths still survive. It regained its reputation as a Spa resort in the late 17th century, and was further developed as such by the Georgians, with many of the city's iconic building being constructed in the 18th century, giving Bath an architectural integrity which justifies its status as a World Heritage Site. This print has been remargined to the lower border, where separated from an adjoining view on the same page. A little marginal foxing, which would be mostly hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 111
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
19 x 15cm


Chapel of St. Joseph of Arimithea, Glastonbury Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of Engli