Copperplate

Carmarthenshire : 8 items

Maps

W. Kip    Camden's Britannia 1637 (1607)
£145
31.5 x 27cm


The first five editions of Camden's successful history and topography of Britain were without maps, but for the sixth edition of 1607 the engravers William Hole and William Kip were commissioned to provide a set of maps of the counties of England and Wales, plus 3 general maps of the countries comprising the new "United Kingdom". These maps were retained for the subsequent 1610 and 1637 editions. They are based on the earlier work of Saxton, Norden, Smith and Owen. This attractively coloured example is from the 1637 edition.
Ref: CRM 824
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-1764
£40
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions.
Ref: CRM 1654
 
T. Hutchinson    Geographia Magnae Britanniae 1748
£40
17 x 14.5cm


This small county atlas of England and Wales was first issued in 1748 by a consortium of 7 publishers who also had a stake in the publication of Daniel Defoe's Tour Through the Whole Island of Great Britain. It was advertised as a companion volume to Defoe's work, or as a pocket atlas in its own right. Thomas Hutchinson's name appears as the engraver on 2 maps, but the rest are unsigned and may be by a variety of hands. They are sometimes also known as Osborne/Wale maps. There was a second edition in 1756. Faint ex-library blind stamp to top 2 corners.
Ref: CRM 826
 
J. Cowley    The Geography of England 1744
£50
15.5 x 13.5cm


Cowley's work was a topographical guide to England and Wales with text and county maps. The title page is dated 1744, though other evidence suggests an actual publication date of November 1743. The 52 maps were re-issued in 1745 as a county atlas without text under the title A New Sett of Pocket Maps of all the Counties of England and Wales. The maps are uncommon.
Ref: CRM 1665
 
J. Wallis W. Reid    The Panorama or Travellers' Instructive Guide 1820
£25
10.5 x 7cm


The Panorama was published by Reid around 1820, although individual counties are sometimes found with the imprint of C. Hinton and J. Wallis, and may be earler. A final 1825 edition was published under the imprint of Hodgson and Co.Original colour, with a page of descriptive text.
Ref: CRM 1667
 
J. Seller    Camden's Britannia Abridg'd 101 (c1695)
£35
14.5 x 12cm


First published in Anglia Contracta in c1695, John Seller's maps were subsequently reissued in A History of England in 1696, and in Camden's Britannia Abridg'd in 1701. They were later re-used in the 1780's in Grose's Antiquities of England and Wales, for which titles and scale-bars were changed, the maps also being set in a page of text. The Seller/Grose maps are common, the originals by Seller much less so. This example of the Carmarthenshire map is from Camden's Britannia Abridg'd published in 1701. Modern hand colour.
Ref: CRM 001
 

Topographical prints - other areas

A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
18.5 x 32cm


Carmarthenshire - Lanharne and Carmarthen Castles. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Laugharne Castle lies on the estuary of the River Taf, and was first built around 116 by the Norman Robert Courtemain. It swapped hands during the English-Welsh wars of the 12th and 13th centuries, suffering damage and rebuilding in the process. In 1575 it was converted to a Tudor mansion by its then-owner Sit John Perrot, but it was besieged in the civil war and subsequently slighted in 1649, becoming a romantic ruin by the time of this print. It is today administerd by the Welsh Heritage body CADW and open to the public. Carmarthen Castle sits on a rocky eminence overlooking the River Twyi, and is first mentioned in records of 1094. It saw action in the 11th and 12th century wars between the English and Welsh, being destroyed by the Welsh in 1215, before being rebuilt by William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke. It was further extended with new building in the 14th century, but was badly damaged in the civil war, and then fell into decay. The building of a prison in the precincts from 1789 resulted in further demolition of the remains. The prison was replaced by a new County Hall in 1938. The surviving parts of the castle are today open to the public without charge. This print, engraved by J.G. Wooding, offers 2 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 427
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£9
19.5 x 16cm


Carmarthenshire - Lanharne (or Laugharne) Castle, . The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Laugharne Castle lies on the estuary of the River Taf, and was first built around 116 by the Norman Robert Courtemain. It swapped hands during the English-Welsh wars of the 12th and 13th centuries, suffering damage and rebuilding in the process. In 1575 it was converted to a Tudor mansion by its then-owner Sir John Perrot, but it was besieged in the civil war and subsequently slighted in 1649, becoming a romantic ruin by the time of this print. It is today administerd by the Welsh Heritage body CADW and open to the public. The print was engraved by Lowry, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text. A few spots.
Ref: TOP 428