Copperplate

H. Boswell : 76 items

UK and British Atlases

A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England & Wales c1787-9
£1550
c16.5 x 21.5(Kitchin)c20 x 30(others)cm


Original full leather binding, rather rubbed and with the front cover detached. Internally a good and clean copy with just a few spotted pages. Issued as a weekly partwork from c1787-9.50 maps in total - 40 English counties, 2 of Wales, 4 of Scotland and one of each of the 4 Irish provinces. Virtually all the maps are in very good condition apart from 4 with slight spotting. All the English counties except Yorkshire are by Kitchin, using maps which first appeared in the London Magazine from 1747-63. The Leinster map is by Garnet Terry. The remaining maps are by Thomas Conder and 5 of them had previously appeared in Hogg's publication theNew British Traveller from 1784. Numerous topographical engavings throughout the text.
Ref: ABR 857
 

Topographical prints - other areas

A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 13.5cm


Dunnington Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The remains of Donnington Castle, just north of Newbury, are today administered by English Heritage. This print was engraved by Thornton, and is supplied with the original accompanying text page and a plan of the castle.
Ref: TOP 232
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16.5 x 27.5cm


Reading Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The ruins of the abbey and its associated buildings still stand in the centre of the modern town where Reading Council has plans to restore and develop the site. This print was engraved by Page, and is supplied with the original accompanying text. A couple of light brown spots.
Ref: TOP 235
 
H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
20 x 16cm


Englefield House. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Englefield House, near Theale, was built in the late 16th century, and survives today as the family home of the Benyon family (since c1740). This print was engraved by Lowry.
Ref: TOP 237
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 14.5cm


St. Michael's Mount. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. St. Michael's Mount is a rocky island in Mount's Bay adjoining the town of Marazion. It can be reached on foot at low tide, but is accessible at other times only by boat or amphibious vehicle. There have been buildings on the site since the 12th century, but since 1659 the castle has been the family home of the St. Aubyn family. The island is now mostly the property of the National Trust. This print was engraved by Lowry, and is supplied with the original accompanying text page from the work.
Ref: TOP 240
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 32cm


Naworth Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Naworth Castle is located close to Brampton, and was built in the late 13th century. It is today the private residence of Philip Howard, brother to the Earl of Carlisle. It is not open to the public but can be hired for private functions. This print was engraved by J.G. Wooding and is supplied with the original, accompanying text page from the work.
Ref: TOP 243
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16 x 10.5cm


Carlisle Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Carlisle Cathedral began life as an Augustinian Priory in 1122, but was soon promoted to cathedral status in 1133. It is one of the smallest cathedrals in the country, its nave having been partly demolished during the civil war. This print was engraved by Goldar after a drawing by Hamilton, and is suppplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 244
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 32.5cm


Lanercost Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Lanercost Priory, near Brampton was originally an Augustinian foundation by Robert de Vaux, dating from c1169. Part of the priory church is still in use as the parish church, and the rest of the church survives, but without its roof. Most of the other monastic building have disappeared, but the site is today managed by English Heritage.. This print was engraved by J. Gooding and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 245
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
15 x 11cm


Castlerigg Stone Circle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Castlerigg stone circle is a Neolithic monument built around 3000BC, and is located in a spectacular location, surrounded by high mountains a few miles east of Keswick. This anonymous print is supplied with the original accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 246
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
15 x 10cm


Exeter Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Exeter became the seat of the Saxon bishop of Devon and Cornwall in 1050, but the Norman cathedral was not founded until 1133, and not completed until c1400 due to changes in architectural taste. This print was engraved by Thornton. A little foxing to the margins.
Ref: TOP 251
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 15cm


Thornbury Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Thornbury Castle was built from1511 for the 3rd Duke of Buckingham, Edward Stafford, who was later beheaded by Henry VIII for treason. It is today a luxury hotel. This print was engraved by Richardson, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text. A few spots.
Ref: TOP 259
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 14.5cm


The Priory of St. Dionysius, Southampton. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Priory of St. Dionysius (also known as St. Denys or St. Denis) was founded by King Henry I in1184. It was situated some 3 miles north of the city centre. After the dissolution of the monasteries decay and stone robbing have meant that only a few fragments of the original priory buildings survive today. This print, engraved by Richardson, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A few ligt spots.
Ref: TOP 266
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
16 x 10.5cm


Winchester Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Winchester Cathedral is of Norman foundation, begun in 1079 and consecrated in 1093, when the adjacent Old Minster which it repaced, was demolished. It is one of the largest cathedrals in the country and houses the tombs of a number of notables, including Saxon Kings, St. Swithun, and Jane Austen. This print was engraved by Thornton and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 267
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16.5 x 11cm


Christchurch Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The site of today's parish church has housed religious buildings since around 800AD. The Normans constructed today's church in the first half of the 12th century. It was originally a secular minster, but became an Augustinian Priory in 1150. After the dissolution of the monasteries most of the monastic buildings were demolished, but the Priory Church survived as the parish church. This print was engraved by Sparrow. A couple of spots to the margin, but otherwise good.
Ref: TOP 268
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 31.5cm


Brompton Brian and Goodrich Castles. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This print, engraved by Lowry, offers two views on one sheet. Brampton Bryan Castle in NW Herefordshire guards the Teme valley route from Ludlow into central Wales. It was first mentioned in Domesday Book. Since 1294 it has been owned by the Harley family, but fell into decay after damage in 2 civil war sieges. Goodrich Castle stands on the River Wye to the south of the county, and dates from the mid 12th century. It was also besieged in the civil war and subsequently sleighted. Its ruins are owned and opened to the public by English Heritage.The print is supplied with the original accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 276
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16.5 x 11cm


Hereford Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Today's Hereford Cathedral was begun in 1079, replacing an earlier church which had occupied the site for around 200 years. Its greatest treasure is probably a 13th century Mappa Mundi (map of the world).
Ref: TOP 277
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17 x 10.5cm


Hitchin Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Hitchin Priory was founded in 1317 as a house for White Carmelite Friars. After the dissolution of the monasteries it was converted into a country house but gradually decayed. A few fragments of the original building survive today, having been incorporated into the fabric of the18th century mansion, now a hotel and known by the name of Hitchin Priory.
Ref: TOP 280
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
19 x 30cm


Barfreston Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Barfreston is a small village between Canterbury and Dover, which has as its parish church, one of the best preserved Norman churches in England. It dates from the 12th century, and is too small to have its own belltower, this difficiency being remedied by hanging the bell ina nearby yew tree and ringing it from within the church by a series of levers. This print was engraved by Peltre.
Ref: TOP 285
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
19 x 31.5cm


The Grand Door of Barfreston Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Barfreston is a small village between Canterbury and Dover, which has as its parish church, one of the best preserved Norman churches in England. It dates from the 12th century, and is too small to have its own belltower, this difficiency being remedied by hanging the bell ina nearby yew tree and ringing it from within the church by a series of levers. This print was engraved by Peltre.
Ref: TOP 286
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 14.5cm


Canterbury Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. A moote and bailey castle was built in Canterbury by William the Conqueror soon after the Norman invasion. This was replaced by a new castle in stone on a nearby site, built between 1100 and 1135. The remains - mostly the keep - are today owned by the local authority and open to the public. This print, engraved by Goldar, is supplied with the original accompanying text page and plan of the castle from the work. A couple of spots.
Ref: TOP 293
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
19 x 14.5cm


Bradsole Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. St. Radigund's Abbey at Bradsole was founded in 1191 as a Premonstratensian religious house, a few miles from Dover. Today the gateway is still mostly intact, and a few other surviving ruins have been incorporated into the farmhouse which occupies the site. This print was engraved by Goldar. A few light, marginal spots.
Ref: TOP 292
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 15cm


Saltwood Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Saltwood Castle, just outside Hythe, is recorded as dating from 488 when it was first built by Aesc, King of Kent. It was passed to the ownership of the church in 1026. It was rebuilt in stone by the Normans in the 12th and succeeding centuries. It still stands today as the private, family home of the Clark family. This print, engraved by Taylor, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 296
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 32cm


Ostenhanger House. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Ostenhanger, or Westenhanger, House is a fortified manor house built c1343 by the de Criol family on an estate near Hythe once owned by King Canute. Over the years the house became neglected and was reduced in size, but has been subject to much restoration by the current owners since the 1990's. It remains a private house but can be leased for conferences and weddings. This print, engraved by Coote, offers 2 views and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 297
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales 1787-9
£10
16.5 x 29cm


Old St. Paul's Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The old cathedral of St. Paul was built between 1087 and 1314, on a site which had housed 3 previous churches. It was destroyed in the great fire of London in 1666, and subsequently rebuilt in Baroque style to a design of Sir Christopher Wren, the new building being completed in 1708. The cathedral is the seat of the Bishop of London. This print offers 3 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A couple of light spots.
Ref: TOP 312
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
21 x 32.5cm


Cheapside and Baynards Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. At the time of this print Cheapside was the site of a major produce market and an important thoroughfare linking the City of London with Westminster. Cheapside actually means "market place". The first post-conquest Norman Baynards Castle was built by Ralph Baynard on a riverfront site to the east of the modern Blackfriars Bridge. It was demolished in 1213, and in 1276 the site became part of Blackfriars Priory. In the late medieval period a new mansion gradually evolved on a close-by site, now owned by the Dukes of York, which also became known as Baynard Castle. In turn this became the royal palace of Henry Vii and Henry VIII before passing to the Dukes of Pembroke and later the Dukes of Shrewsbury. The house was destroyed in the great fire of London in 1666, though some substantial ruins survived to be incorporated into later wharfs and timberyards. The site is now occupied by a BT office block. This print offers 2 views engrved by Wooding, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 314
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18 x 32.5cm


Sion House and Kenwood House. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. yon House was built in the mid 16th century for the Duke of Somerset, being subsequently acquired by the Percy Family, Dukes of Northumberland, in1594. It continues as the family's residence today, and is open to the public. Kenwood (originally Caen Wood) House in Hampstead was built in the early 17th century, and in 1754 was acquired by William Murray, Ist Earl Mansfield, who engaged Robert Adam to remodel and add to it in the 1760's and 70's. In 1925 it was purchaed by Lord Iveagh who gave it to the nation 2 years later, and it is today administered by English Hertitage who open it to the public. Two views on one page, engraved by Roberts, and supplied with the original,accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 316
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 14.5cm


Castle Acre Monastery . The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Cluniac Priory was built in the grounds of the castle of Castle Acre, and was consecrated between 1148 and 1148. After the dissolution of the monasteries the priory fell into decay, eventually passing into the hands of the Earls of Leicester, who still own the site today. The ruins of both the priory and the castle are managed by English Heritage and open to the public.
Ref: TOP 322
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
24.5 x 16.5cm


Daventry Priory. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Daventry's Cluniac Priory was origianlly founded in Preston Capes, with 4 monks, but shortly afterwards removed to Daventry. It was dissolved by Henry VIII in 1525, and the site given to what is now Christ Church College, Oxford.The Priory church became the town's Parish Church, until the late 18th century, when it was replaced by today's parish church.
Ref: TOP 080
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Boughton Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The village of Boughton lies 4 miles to the north of Northampton's town centre, being today a suburb of the town. The church illustrated in this print, engraved by Peltro, is the Old Church of St. John, which was a picturesque ruin at the time this print was taken, its tower and spire standing a few years longer until c1785. A few fragments may still be found to the north of the village green. The Old Church was replaced as the parish church by what had hitherto been the Chapel of St. John the Baptist, dating from c1350. It has been much extended since then and still serves the parish.
Ref: TOP 324
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 14.5cm


St. Sepulchre's Church, Northampton. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is one of only 4 surviving round churches in the country. It was founded in the early 12th century by Simon de Senlis, and is probably modelled on the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem (which de Senlis is likely to have visited when he took part in the first crusade). The original short nave was later extended and a chancel and aisles were added. The church was extensively restored in the 19th century by George Gilbert Scott. This print, engraved by Wooding, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 325
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18 x 14.5cm


Monastery of the Black Friars, Newcastle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The order of Dominicans (The Blackfriars) founded their friary in Newcastle in 1239. It is sited to the NW of the city centre just within the city walls. Upon the dissolution of the monasteries, most of the buildings were demolished and the site passed to the city Corporation, who in 1552 leased out the remaining cloister buildings to the city's craft guilds. With the decline of the guilds the buildings fell into disrepair. They were restored by the Corporation between 1973 and 81, and are now leased out as craft workshops and a restaurant, though the Tanners Guild also still meet there. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 328
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
19 x 14.5cm


Mitford Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Mitford Castle dates from the late 11th century, and had a number of owners before it was destroyed in the early 14th century, possibly by the Scots. Much of its stone was used to build a Jacoberan Mansion, but the remaining, imposing ruins still stand on a hill overlooking the small town of Mitford, near Morpeth. Its current owners are conserving and restoring the remains with grant aid from English Heritage. This print, engraved by Roberts, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A few spots.
Ref: TOP 330
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 32cm


Lindisfarne Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The island of Lindisfarne (or Holy Island) lies 1 mile off the north Northumbrian coast, and joined to the mainland at low tide.A Priory was founded there by St. Aidan in 634 AD, and which under St. Cuthbert became a leading centre for learning and the Christian faith, producing such works as the still surviving Lindisfarne Gospels. The monks fled the island in 878 after attacks by the Vikings and Danes, but the Priory was re-established in 1093, and continued until the dissolution of the monasteries, after which the buildings decayed. The ruins are today in the care of English Heritage and open to the public. This print, engraved by Wooding, offers 2 views on one sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A couple of light spots.
Ref: TOP 335
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 31.5cm


Hulne Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Hulne Abbey was a Carmelite Priory founded in 1240 near Alnwick. After the dissolution of the monasteries the site passed to the Percy Family, Dukes of Northumberland. It is still owned by them and the substantial ruins in what is now Hulne Park are open to the public (pedestrians only). This print , engraved by Peltro, offers 2 views on one sheet, and is supplied with the original text from the work. A little marred by foxing.
Ref: TOP 337
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 31.5cm


Newstead Abbey & Ruins in Nottingham Park. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Newstead Abbey was founded in 165 as an Augustinian Priory. After the dissolution of the monasteries the site passed to the Byron family in 1540, and was converted to a country house. By the time it was inherited by Lord Byron, the estate and house was much declined, and financial problems forced him to sell it in 1818. It is today owned by Nottingham Corporation who open it to the public. The "Ruins" described in the print, are part of Nottingham's system of over 500 caves, cut into the sandstone underlying the city. The earliest of the caves date back to to the late 13th century, and over the years they have served as cellars, a tannery, homes and air-raid shelters. Today some are open as a visitor attraction under the title "City of Caves". This print, engraved by Roberts, offers two views and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 341
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Friar Bacon's Study, Oxford.. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Friar Bacon's Study (or Tower) was a 3 story building straddling the north end of South or Folly Bridge, carrying the main Oxford-Abingdon road across the Thames. It was lived and worked in by the 13th century alchemist Roger Bacon, but demolished in 1779 to allow for road widening. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 343
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Banbury Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Church illustrated is the old parish church, dedicated to St. Mary the Virgin. It dated from from 12th century, but its mid 15th century tower was too heavy and contributed to structural problems, exacerbated by civil war damage.. By the mid 18th century these problems were so great that it was decided to replace the building. In 1797 it was pulled down and replaced by the present parish church. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 344
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Godstow Nunnery. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Godstow Nunnery was a Benedictine Abbey dating from 1139 when the Abbey Church was consecrated. It became famous as the resting place of Rosamund Clifford, mistress of Henry II, but after the dissolution of the monasteries was converted to a private house. Severe damage in the civil war resulted in its subsequent decay and abandonment. Its ruins can still, however, be visited on the banks of the Thames about 2.5 miles from the centre of Oxford. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 345
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 16cm


Oxford Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The first castle in Oxford was built by Baron Robert D'Oyly between 1071 and 1073. By the mid 12th century it had been extended and rebuilt in stone. Over the years it has seen many changes, being used as a family stronghold, a prison, an administrative centre, and a couthouse. Much of the medieval castle was lost in alterations made during the civil war, and the keep was demolished in the early 18th century, as the site was gradually redeveloped. The main use was as a gaol, although the prison finally closed in 1996. The site is now mixed use, housing a hotel, restaurant, offices, and heritage attractions which continue to show what remains of the medieval castle. This print, engraved by Eastgate, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A few spots.
Ref: TOP 347
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 32cm


The Chapel & Old Kitchin at Stanton Harcourt. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Manor House at Stanton Harcourt, 6 miles west of Oxford, was built by the Harcourt family in medieval times. In 1688 it ceased to be the family's main residence and fell gradually into disrepair. It was mostly demolished in the mid 18th century, leaving the chapel, kitchen, gatehouse and some other features as picturesque ruins by the time this print was taken. The gatehouse was extended and refurbished in the 19th and 20th centuries, and is occupied today as a private residence. The site is still family owned.This print, engraved by Noble, offers 2 views on one sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 348
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Grace Dieu Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Grace Dieu Priory, near Thringstone in NW Leicestershire, was founded as an Augustinian Priory by Roesia de Verdon around 1235-41. After the dissolution of the monasteries it was converted to a private residence, before most of the buildings on the site were demolished in the late 17th century. The ruins of the Priory still survive in private ownership. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 351
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
18.5 x 14.5cm


Oakham Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Oakham Castle was built between 1180 and 1190 for the Lord of the Manor, Walchelin de Ferriers. Although designated a castle, a better description of the property is probably a fortified Manor House, of which today only the great hall survives - an excellent example of its type. The hall is famouse for its collection of decorative horseshoes presented by visiting royalty and other dignitaries. The site is today owned by Rutland County Council, with free public access. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 352
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-89
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Acton Burnell Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The village of Acton Birnell is 9 miles SE of Shrewsbury. By 1283 it contained a Manor House belonging to Robert Burnell, Bishop of Bath and Wells, and was the site of an early Parliament convened by King Edward I. From 1284-93, the house was fortified by licence of the King. Over succeeding centuries the property passed through the hands of several families, but fell gradually into decay, and many of the buildings had been demolished by c1650. The ruins of the manor house, and gables of its great barn still survive in the care of English Heritage, who provide access without charge. This print was engraved by Eastgate. A few light spots.
Ref: TOP 355
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 15cm


Halesowen Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Halesowen Abbey is situtated in what was until 1844 an outlying portion of the county of Shropshire. It was founded in1215 as a Premonstratension house. After the dissolution of the monasteries the site was allowed to decay and many of its buildings were robbed for their stone, with some parts of the site incorporated into the outbuildings of Manor Farm in the 18th century. Today the ruins are maintained by English Heritage with free public access. This print was engraved by Noble, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 356
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
19 x 15cm


Chapel of St. Joseph of Arimithea, Glastonbury Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Chapel of St. Joseph is part of the surviving ruins of Glastonbury Abbey. According to one tradition, the Abbey was founded in the 1st century AD by Joseph of Arimethea, but in actuality its first foundation dates from the 7th century AD. The old monastery was mostly destroyed by fire in 1184, but reconstruction began immediately afterwards, and the Abbey grew into one of richest in the country. After the dissolution of the monasteries, it passed into private ownership, and the site was robbed of much of its stone. The surviving ruins are today owned by Glastonbury Abbey Trust, and open to the public. This print, engraved by Noble, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A few spots to the margins.
Ref: TOP 358
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
15.5 x 28cm


The Cathedral Churches of Bath and Bristol. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The "so-called" Cathedral Church of Bath is now a misnomer. Bath Abbey is today the Parish Church. It was formerly the church of a Benedictine Abbey, raised to cathedral status in 1090 when the Bishop transferred his seat from Wells. The existingl Abbey church was subsequently much rebuilt. In 1245 status disputes between Wells and Bath were resolved by the Pope, who gave them joint status, though Wells became the Bishop's seat once again, but after the dissolution of the monasteries, much of Bath Abbey was demolished apart from part of the nave which became the Parish Church. This print, engraved by Thornton, offers 2 views on 1 sheet and is supplied with the original accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 360
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 32cm


Dudley Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The first castle at Dudley was built shortly after the Norman conquest, but the present day remains date from the rebuilding in the13h and 14th centuries or later. Much of that castle was demolished after civil war sieges in the 1640's, and a fire of 1750 destroyed the remaining inhabitable buildings, leaving a romantic shell for 18th and 19th century picturesque tourists. The owners, the Dukes od Dudley, incorporated these into the new Dudley zoo in1937, and zoo and castle are today a joint visitor attraction. Althoughthe town of Dudley was historically part of Worcestershire the castle was located in an enclave of Staffordshire until county borders were rationalised in 1926. This print, engraved by Noble, offers 2 views on 1 sheet. A little spotting.
Ref: TOP 363
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
cm


Alderton Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Alderton is a small village about 6 miles noth of Felixstowe. The partially ruined church of St. Andrew is interesting and picuresque. The oldest parts of the church date from the 14th century and the tower was built in the 15th century, but apparently not very well. It progressively collapsed to its current height and state of ruination from the 17th century up to 1821. With no tower, the church bell is today mounted on a wooden framework in the churchyard. The rest of the church was restored by the Victorians. This print, engraved by Noble, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 365
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
21 x 15cm


Cardinal Wolsey's College, Ipswich. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Cardinal Wolsey came from Ipswich and attended the local small grammar school. In 1528 work began on a new Grammar School in the town, intended by Wolsey as a feeder to his recently founded Cardinal College in Oxford. Unfortunately the school was unfinished by the time of Wolsey's fall in 1830, and most of what had been built was demolished, though the school was later refounded by King Henry VIII and survives today as Ipswich School on a different site. The original site of Wolsey's College passed into private hands, and today only one gateway of the original complex survives, known locally as "Wolsey's Gate".
Ref: TOP 366
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 15cm


Orford Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Orford Castle was built by King Henry II beween 1165 and 1173, as a check on the power of the local and rebelliously-inclined Bigod family. In 1336 it passed into private hands under the ownership of the Earls of Essex, but gradually fell into the decayed state shown on this print, with only the unusual keep surviving. Today it is owned and managed by English Heritage, who open it to the public. This print was engraved by Noble.
Ref: TOP 367
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1797-9
£12
18.5 x 32cm


Lambeth Palace. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Lambeth Palace sits on the south bank of the Thames, and is the London residence of the Archbishop of London. The complex has been rebuilt and extended over the centuries, with the earliest surviving part being Lollards Tower, dating from 1435-40. Ths print, engraved by Ellis, offers 2 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original accompanying text. A couple of marginal spots.
Ref: TOP 372
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
17 x 32.5cm


Lambeth Palace and Westminster Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Lambeth Palace sits on the south bank of the Thames, and is the London residence of the Archbishop of London. The complex has been rebuilt and extended over the centuries, with the earliest surviving part being Lollards Tower, dating from 1435-40. The first Westminster Abbey was founded by Edward the Confessor, but the present building was begun in 1245, with work continuing until 1517. The two western towers were addded by Hawksmoor between 1722 and 1745. The Abbey has been used for all royal coronations since 1066. This print, engraved by Taylor, offers two views on one sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 374
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17 x 11cm


Winchelsea Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Old Winchelsea was a thriving port, dating from Saxon times, which was lost to encroachment by the sea in 1287. King Edward I founded a new town to replace it in 1288. New Winchelsea had fortified town walls and 4 gates, but never had a castle. The castle here mis-named is actually Camber Castle built in 2 stages from 1512-14 and 1539-55 to protect the port of Rye. Camber Castle is only just over 1mile from both Winchelsea and Rye. It is today maintained by English Heritage and open to the public. This print is engraved by Sparrow.
Ref: TOP 377
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 15cm


Boxgrove Priory (near Chichester). The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Boxgrove Priory was a Benedictine house founded by Robert de Haye around 1066. After the dissolution of the monasteries the Priory church was retained to serve the parish, as it still does today. Other ruins of the Priory, including its hospitium or guest house, are under the care of English Heritage with free access to the public. This print, engraved by Thornton, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 379
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 15cm


Battle Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Battle Abbey was built between 1070 and 1094 on the site of the Battle of Hastings. After the dissolution of the monasteriespart of the site became a private house, other parts being robbed for their stone. Some surviving ruins today form part of Battle Abbey School. Other parts are maintained by English Heritage and open to the public. This print was engraved by Thornton.
Ref: TOP 380
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
19 x 31.5cm


Lewes Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Lewes Priory was a Cluniac house to the south of Lewes in the Ouse Valley. It was founded in c1081, and mostly demolished after the dissolution of the monasteries. Some remains still survive in public grounds owned by Lewes Town Council, and managed by a local Trust with free access. This print, engraved by Page, offers 2 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text
Ref: TOP 381
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
10 x 19cm


Kendal Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Kendal Castle was built in the late 12th century by the Lancaster family, Baron's of Kendal. Its last enhabitant was probably William Parr, Baron of Kendal, and grandfather to Catherine Parr, who married King Henry VIII in 1543. By that time the Castle had been abandoned to decay. The site is today owned by the South Lakeland District Council who allow free access to the scant ruins. This print, engraved by Lowry, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 391
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 14.5cm


Shap Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Shap Abbey was a Premonstratensian house, built 1199 in a remote spot on the banks of the River Lowther a couple of miles from Shap. After the dissolution of the monasteries the site was robbed for stone to build Shap's Market Hall and Lowther Castle, but the impressive tower of the Abbey church still stands with other ruins. The site is owned today by the National Trust with free public access.
Ref: TOP 392
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 14.5cm


Brougham Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Brougham Castle lies c2 miles from Penrith, and was founded by Robert de Viexpont in the early 13th century.. In the 1260's it passed by marriage to the Clifford family, later Earls of Cumbria, who held is as one of their properties until 1676. It then passed to the Tufton family, Earls of Thanet, but was poorly maintained and eventually abandoned to decay. By the late 18th century it was a romantic, picturesque ruin. The Castle is today in the care of English Heritage and open to the public. This print, engraved by Coote, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 393
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14cm


Malmesbury Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Malmesbury Abbey was founded as a Benedictine house in the late 7th centry AD, and the town of Malmesbury grew up around it. The current Abbey was constructed in the 12th century, and mostly complete by 1180. Two major collapses in the 16th century - to the main tower and the west tower - caused great damage to other parts of the fabric, resulting in the shortening of the church. After the dissolution of the monasteries the surviving part became the parish church, and continues to fulfil that role today. This print, engraved by Peltro is supplied with the original, accompanying text. A slight crease.
Ref: TOP 395
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 14.5cm


Evesham Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Evesham Abbey was founded by St. Egwin between 700 and 710 AD as a Benedictine house, and by the late middle ages was one of the richest in England. After the dissolution of the monasteries it was gradually robbed of its stone by the local townspeople, and today the bell tower is the only substantial remain, this being of 16th century date. This print, engraved by Coote, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 400
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 14.5cm


Edgar's Tower, Worcester. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Worcester once had a castle, first built in the early Norman period, and strengthened over time. Edgar's Gate (here called Edgar's Tower) was the main entrance into the castle, and dates from the 14th century. No other part of the castle survives, and the gate is now the entrance into the cathedral precinct, its rooms being used by The King's School, Worcester. This print, engraved by M. Coote, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 401
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
17.5 x 32cm


Dudley Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Dudley Priory was founded in 1160 by Gervase Paganel, Lord of Dudley. It was a dependecy of the larger Cluniac house at Much Wenlock. After the dissolution of the monasteries it gradually became ruinous, until Dudley County Borough bought the site and surrounding land in 1926. The land was developed for housing but the ruins were restored as the centrepiece of the new Priory Park which opened in 1932. This print, engraved by Coote, offers 2 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 402
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 14cm


Richmond . The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Richmond Castle was founded Alan Rufus first Lord of Richmond, as part of the Norman pacification of northern England. It was completed in 1086, and stands at the head of Swaledale overlooking the River Swale. It was strengthened by Henry II, including the building of the stone keep, but thereafter decayed and was partially in ruins by 1538. In the early 19th century it was restored and used as the HQ of the North Yorkshire Militia, for whom a new barracks block was built in the courtyard. Today it is owned by English Heritage and opened to the public. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 413
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
18.5 x 32cm


Bolton Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Bolton Castle was constructed between 1378-98 by Richard, first Baron Scrope of Bolton, on the eastern edge of the Yorkshire Dales. In 1630 the last member of the Scrope family died, and through the female line the property passed to the Powlett family. It is today still owned by the 8th Baron Powlett, and is opened to the public, and available for wedding hire. This print, engraved by Thornton, is supplied with the original, accompanying text. A few spots.
Ref: TOP 404
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 32cm


Middleham Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Middleham Castle, in Wensleydale, was buily by Robert Fitzrandolph, third Lord of Middleham from 1190. In 1270 it passed into the hands of the powerful Neville family, and was later the home of the future King Richard III who married Anne Neville in 1472. It remained a royal property after Richard's death at the Battle of Bosworth, until it was sold by James I, after which it fell into disrepair. Today the impressive ruins are managed by English Heritage and open to the public.This print, engarved by Thornton, offers two views on one sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text. A few spots.
Ref: TOP 405
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
18.5 x 32cm


Fountains Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Fountains Abbey was a Cistercian house founded by 13 monks expelled from St. May's Abbey in York in 1132, but offered a site for a new house in the Yorkshire Dales by the Archbishop of York. From modest biginnings in grew (in 2 major building phases) to become one of the largest and richest monastic sites in the country. After the dissolution of the monasteries the site passed through several owners, who robbed it of salvageable materials, before being combined with the neighbouring Studley Royal Estate of William Aislaby in 1767. The estate was purchased by the National Trust in 1983, and is today managed on their behalf by English Heritage, who open it to the public. This print, engraved by Eastgate, offers 2 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text page and plan of the site.
Ref: TOP 407
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 32.5cm


Bowes & Coningsburgh Castles. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The first Bowes Castle was built by Alan de Bretagne, Count of Brittanyaround 1386 within an old Roman fort. Henry II later rebuilt it in stone from 1171-4. Damaged in Scottish raods and by local insurgency, the castle was ruinous by 1340. Today it is owned by English Heritage who open it to the public. Coningsburgh or Conisburough Castle was built on the River Don shortly after the Norman conquest by William de Warenne, Earl of Srrey. It was rebuilt in stone in the late 12th century, but later suffered from subsidence and fell into decay. By the late 19th century it was a picturesque tourist attraction. A consortium undertook restoration in the 1990's and today it is maintained and opened to the public by English Heritage. This print, engraved by Eastgate, offers 2 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text pages.
Ref: TOP 408
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 32.5cm


Carisbrooke Castle, Isle of Wight. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Carisbrooke Castle existed by 1100 when it was in the possession of Richard de Redvers, but forts existed on the site in both Roman and Saxon times. The castle was purchased by King Edward I in 1293, since when it has been a crown property controlled by a Warden. King Charles 1 was imprisoned there in 1648/9 prior to his trial and execution, and in more recent times it was home to Queen Victoria's daughter, Princess Beatrice from 1896-1944. It is today maintained by English Heritage who open it to the public. This print, engraved by Neigel, offers 2 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 414
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
19 x 14cm


Castle Rushin (Rushen), Castletown, Isle of Man. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Castle Rushin stands in a central position in Castletown, the historic capital of the Isle of Man. The first timber castle on the site was probably constructed in the 9th centry AD, with later rebuilding in stone and additions from the 13th to the 16th centuries. It was originally a possession of the Kings of Mann, and subsequently fought over by the Scots and English, changing hands several times. After 1660 its densive importance reduced, and it fell into decay, though still used as a prison, until it was restored in the late 19th century. It has been owned by Manx National Heritage since 1988, and is open as a heritage centre and museum. This print, engraved by Peltro, is supplied with the original, accompanying text. A few spots - mostly to the margins - which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 420
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
19 x 32cm


St Patrick's Church & St Germain's Cathedral at Peel Castle, Isle of Man. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The remiains of St. Patrick's Church and St. German's Cathedral both stand within the precints of Peel Castle, located on St. Patrick's Isle which has a causeway connection to the town of Peel.The first structure on the island was the Celtic monastery of St. Patrick, built sometime in the 10th century. Magnus Barefoot, King of Mann is believed to have built the first castle in the 11th century, incorporating part of the monastery, notably the surviving round tower. Most of the other extant castle remains date from the early 14th century. Within the castle precinct are the ruins of the cathedral of St. German, built in stages between the 12th and 14th centuries, but later abandoned to decay from the 18th century. The site is today maintained by Manx National Heritage and open to the public.
Ref: TOP 421
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 14.5cm


Brecknockshire - Trtior Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Trtior (or Tretower) Castle was first built around 1200 by the Picard family, originally in timber, but soon with the addition of a stone keep. The walls were later also rebuilt in stone. In the early 14th century a new fortified house (named Tretower Court) was built by the family outside the castle precincts. This offered much more comfortable and modern accommodation, and over time the castle fell into misuse and decay. In 1540 the properties passed to the Vaughan family until they sold them in 1783, after which Tretower Court also declined. It was saved by Government intervention in the 20th century, and is today maintained and opened to the the public by the Wesh Heritage Agency CADW. This print, engraved by Carey, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 422
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 14.5cm


Brecknockshire - Brecknock Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Brecon Castle was built in the late 11th century by Bernard de Neufmarche, brother of William the Conqueror. Its strategic position at the confluence of the Rivers Usk and Honddu, made it an iimportant military and administrative centre for the Lords of Brecon's control of the Welsh Marches.. The original castle was built in timber but soon strengthened and extended with new stoneworks during the 12th and 13th centuries. From the mid 16th century its defensive role declined, and it fell into disrepair and decay before its acquisition and restoration by the Morgan family, who gave it a new life as a hotel, which it remains today. This print, engraved by Carey, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 423
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
14 x 10.5cm


Caernarvonshire - Bangor Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The site of Bangor Cathedral was originally occupied by a monastery established around 525 AD by St. Deiniol, of which nothing today survives. The earliest parts of today's cathedral date from the first half of the 12th century, but the building was damaged or destroyed several times thereafter, with rebuilding in between. Major reconstruction occurred from c1500 to 1532, and in Victorian times much restoration was done by George Gilbert Scott from 1868. This print was engraved by Thornton.
Ref: TOP 424
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
19 x 32cm


Cardiganshire - Cardigan and Aberystwyth Castles,. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The first Norman castle at Cardigan was built around 1093. During the English-Welsh wars of the 12th and 13th centuries the castle changed hands several times, until it was captured in 1240 by the English and rebuilt and strengthened by Earl Gilbert of Pembroke. It saw action and suffered damage in the civil war, before becoming a prison in the 18th century. A Georgian mansion was built in the precincts in the early 1800's. In 2003 the site was bought by Ceredigion County Council, and has been under restoration. It is due to open to the public in April 2015. Today's Aberystwyth Castle was built by King Edward I between 1277 and 1289, though there may have been an earlier Norman castle on a different site.. It was captured and held by Owain Glyndwr from 1404 to 1408, but regained by the English as the Welsh revolt collapsed. It was slighted at the end of the civil war in c1649, and its surviving ruins are today managed by Aberystwyth Town Council and open to the public. This print, engarved by Eastgate, offers 2 views on one sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 426
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£9
18 x 14.5cm


Montgomeryshire - Powis Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Powis Castle was the ancestral home af a dynasty of Welsh Princes, and was constructed around 1200. in 1266 the last hereditary Prince, Owain ap Gruffydd relinquished his royal title to become Baron de la Pole, retaining his estates. In 1579 his descendant sold both title and castle to Sir Edward Herbert, whose son became 1st Baron Powis. The castle underwent major updating and alterations from 1665-1690, and again from 1784 when the castle and its estates passed by marriage to the wealthy Edward Clive (son of Clive of India). In the early 20th century further updating was undertaken and today's famous gardens were created. The castle passed to the National Trust in 1952, and is open to the public. This print, engraved by Lowry, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 439