Copperplate

E. Bowen : 89 items

Maps

E. Bowen    General Magazine of Arts and Sciences 1760
£45
17 x 19cm


This map first appeared in the March 1760 number of Benjamin Martin's General Magazine of Arts and Sciences, a monthly partwork which between 1755 and 1762 issued a series of county maps. In 1763 those parts relating to natural history were collected together into 2 volumes with the county maps and offered under the title The Natural History of England. There were no later re-issues and the maps are not common. This example, in modern hand colour, and is sold mounted and ready to frame if so desired.
Ref: BED 070
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£42
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, this example being from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: BER 022
 
E. Bowen    Royal English Atlas c1764
£250
40 x 49.5cm


The Royal English Atlas was probably an attempt to repeat the commercial success of The Large English Atlas, with a somewhat smaller format. The maps were again engraved by Kitchin and Bowen, and the partners in the enterprise were based around the consortium that had finally brought out The Large English Atlas in 1760. This time, however, they misjudged the market, and although there were some later re-issues of the atlas, the modern rarity of the maps suggests it was not very successful. This example is from the first edition, and is most attractively coloured.
Ref: BUC 001
 
E. Bowen    The Natural History of England 1763 (1758)
£65
17 x 20cm


This map first appeared in 1758 in Benjamin Martin's General Magazine of Arts and Sciences, a monthly partwork which commenced publication in 1755. In 1763 those parts relating to natural history were collected together into 2 volumes with the county maps and offered under the title The Natural History of England. There were no later re-issues and the maps are not common. Close trimmed to the botton right-hand border to fit the volume, and here re-margined to assist mounting if desired. Supplied with the ten text pages describing the county.
Ref: BUC 008
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£45
11.5 x 18.5cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, this example being from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: CNV 828
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-1764
£40
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions.
Ref: CRM 1654
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£35
12 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, this example being from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: DEN 834
 
E. Bowen    Large English Atlas 1758
£240
52.5 x 68cm


Coloured. Some repaired marginal tears including 2 impinging c 3cm within the bottom right border of the map. Otherwise a good and early example. This new series of maps was commenced in 1749, with maps sold singly until the last counties were completed and the full series issued in 1760 as the Large English Atlas. Derbyshire was first issued in 1758. J.Tinney's name on the imprint dates this copy to the first edition of the atlas in 1760 or earlier.
Ref: DER 135
 
C. Bowles E. Bowen    Bowles New Medium Atlas 1785 (1767)
£135
32 x 22.5cm


This map first appeared in 1767 in the Atlas Anglicanus, published by Thomas Kitchin with maps engraved by Emanuel and Thomas Bowen. The maps copied the Large English Atlas in style, with rococo cartouches, and topographical notes surrounding the maps. The maps for the Atlas Anglicanus were first issued in monthly partworks between 1767 and 1768 before the complete atlas followed in 1768. The first state Doset map bears the signature of Emanuel Bowen alone, who was involved only in the early maps in the set before his death in early 1767. There was a second edition of the atlas in c1777, before the plates passed to Carington Bowles and were updated and re-issued as Bowles' New Medium English Atlas in 1785. On Bowles' death the plates passed to his business successors, trading as Bowles and Carver, who re-issued the atlas sometime after 1793 with their own imprint as proprietors on individual maps. The Atlas Anglicanus was not a commercial success and maps from it are not commonly found. This example is dated 1785, and is thus from the map's first issue by Bowles. Original colour. A short, repaired tear to the lower centrefold, just entering the border, but without loss.
Ref: DOR 016
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£40
11.5 x 18.0cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month time frame between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, this example being from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: DUR 180
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£60
11.5 x 18.0cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, this example being from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: ESS 195
 
E. Bowen    Large English Atlas c1764-67 (1749)
£225
71 x 52.5cm


The idea for a new county atlas, with a large format bigger than any predecessor, was initiated in 1749 by John Hinton. For a variety of reasons, however, progress was slow. Maps were offered for individual sale as the printing plates were completed, but the series was not finished until 1760 when the atlas was finally published. All but a few of the maps were drawn and engraved by Emanuel Bowen and Thomas Kitchin. The atlas proved to be a commercial success, and a number of later editions were issued up to 1787. The Essex map, engraved by Bowen, was one of the first published 1749. The publishers imprint on this example (John Bowles, Carington Bowles and Robert Sayer) dates it to between c 1764 and c1787. Light overall toning. The margins are narrow, but sufficient for mounting and framing.
Ref: ESS 022
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£40
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, this example being from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: FLT 837
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720 - c1764
£55
11.5 x 18.0cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, and this example is probably from one of the latter. Supplied mounted and ready for framing.
Ref: GLO 002
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£65
11.5 x 18.0cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month time-frame between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen). It also included a set of English and Welsh county maps as well as the road maps, all of which were engraved by Emanuel Bowen.The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions.
Ref: HAM 003
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-c1764
£30
11.5 x 18.5cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions.
Ref: HUN 014
 
E. Bowen    Large English Atlas 1756-60 (1756)
£180
69 x 52.5cm


Map includes Rutland. Original outline colour. Some old folds with a pinhole where they meet within the upper right text block. Some repaired marginal tears not affecting the printed area. This new series of maps was commenced in 1749, with maps sold singly until the last counties were completed and the full series issued in 1760 as the Large English Atlas. Leicestershire-Rutland was first issued in 1756. J.Tinney's name on the imprint dates this copy to the first edition of the atlas in 1760 or earlier.
Ref: LEI 348
 
E. Bowen    Large English Atlas 1767-80 (1751)
£250
70 x 52.5cm


This new series of maps was commenced in 1749, with maps sold singly until the last counties were completed and the full series issued in 1760 as the Large English Atlas. Lincolnshire was first issued in 1751. The imprint of Robert Sayer and Carington Bowles dates this example to the editions of c1767-1780. Original outline colour.
Ref: LIN 004
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£35
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions.
Ref: MER 003
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£43
11.5 x 18.5cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, this example being from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: MTG 846
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£40
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, this example being from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: NTN 525
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£40
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, this example being from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: NMB 543
 
E. Bowen    Royal English Atlas 1777 (c1764)
£185
41 x 50cm


The Royal English Atlas, first published around 1764, was probably an attempt to repeat the commercial success of The Large English Atlas, with a somewhat smaller format. The maps were again engraved by Kitchin and Bowen, and the partners in the enterprise were based around the consortium that had finally brought out The Large English Atlas in 1760. This time, however, they misjudged the market, and although there were some later re-issues of the atlas, the modern rarity of the maps suggests it was not very successful. This example, dated 1777, bears the publishers' imprint of R. Sayer,J. Bennett, J. Bowles and C. Bowles. Slight browning to the outer margins, and centrefold repairs without loss. Original outline colour.
Ref: NMB 020
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£40
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, this example being from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: NOT 572
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£35
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, this example being from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: RAD 852
 
E. Bowen    Large English Atlas 1756-60 (1756)
£180
69 x 52.5cm


Map includes Leicestershire. Original outline colour. Some old folds with a pinhole where they meet within the upper right text block. Some repaired marginal tears not affecting the printed area.This new series of maps was commenced in 1749, with maps sold singly until the last counties were completed and the full series issued in 1760 as the Large English Atlas. Leicestershire-Rutland was first issued in 1756. J.Tinney's name on the imprint dates this copy to the first edition of the atlas in 1760 or earlier.
Ref: LEI 348
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£36
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions, this example being from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: SHR 622
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£35
11.5 x 18cm


In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has a road map to the verso showing the road from York to Pickering via Malton..
Ref: WES 009
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£45
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions.Supplied mounted.
Ref: WIL 011
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£65
11.5 x 18cm


North & East Ridings. Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month time-frame between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen). It also included a set of English and Welsh county maps as well as the road maps, all of which were engraved by Emanuel Bowen.The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions.
Ref: YOR 004
 
E. Bowen    Royal English Atlas c1764-1774 (1764)
£125
51.5 x 43.5cm


The Royal English Atlas was probably an attempt to repeat the commercial success of The Large English Atlas, with a somewhat smaller format. The maps were again engraved by Kitchin and Bowen, and the partners in the enterprise were based around the consortium that had finally brought out The Large English Atlas in 1760. This time, however, they misjudged the market, and although there were some later re-issues of the atlas, the modern rarity of the maps suggests it was not very successful. This example is from the first edition, and is in original outline colour. Apart from being offered in atlas format the maps were also sold singly, as with this example, which is dissected, linen-backed and folds into its original slip case. The publishers' imprint dates this map to c1764-74. Light overall toning.
Ref: YOR 055
 
E. Bowen    Large English Atlas c1767-79
£425
53 x 69cm


Original colour. Dissected and linen-backed, folding into its original slip case. Publication of the maps that eventually made up the Large English Atlas began in 1749. Lancashire was published in c1752, with the full Atlas being completed in 1760. Maps were also sold singly, either as full sheets or sometimes dissected and linen-backed as this example. The imprint of Carington Bowles and Robert Sayer dates this example to c 1767-79.
Ref: LAN 1173
 
E. Bowen    Large English Atlas 1750-60 (1750)
£475
70 x 52cm


Outline colour. Framed and glazed in a brown and gold frame. Repair to bottom centrefold. A detailed and most interesting map. This new series of maps was begun in 1749, with maps being sold singly until the last counties were completed and the full series issued in 1760 as the Large English Atlas. Surrey was first issued in 1750. John Tinney's name on the imprint dates this example to the first issue of the atlas in 1760 or earlier.
Ref: SUR 1130
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-c1764
£65
11.5 x 18cm


First published in 1720 with maps drawn and engraved by Emanuel Bowen, Britannia Depicta was a considerable commercial success and ran to several editions, the last issued around 1764.
Ref: COR 1427
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-c1764
£45
11.5 x 18.0cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions up to c1764. Supplied mounted and ready to frame.
Ref: HRT 004
 
E. Bowen    The Natural History of England 1763 (1759)
£45
20.5 x 16.5cm


This map first appeared in 1759 in Benjamin Martin's General Magazine of Arts and Sciences, a monthly partwork which commenced publication in the same year. In 1763 those parts relating to natural history were collected together into 2 volumes with the county maps and offered under the title The Natural History of England. There were no later re-issues and the maps are not common.
Ref: HRT 014
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720 -64
£60
12 x 18.5cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month time-frame between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen). It also included a set of English and Welsh county maps as well as the road maps, all of which were engraved by Emanuel Bowen.The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions. This is the second state of the map..
Ref: DEV 028
 
E. Bowen    Large English Atlas 1768-79 (1749)
£240
70.5 x 52cm


This new series of maps was commenced in 1749, with maps sold singly until the last counties were completed and the full series issued in 1760 as the Large English Atlas. Norfolk was first issued in 1749. The joint imprint of Carrington Bowles and Robert Sayer dates this example to c1768-1779. Repair to lower centrefold split and 2 small holes, but otherwise a nice copy in original outline colour.
Ref: NFK 1607
 
E. Bowen T. Bowen    Atlas Anglicanus 1768-77
£155
32.5 x 22.5cm


The success of the Large English Atlas from 1760 encouraged Emanuel Bowen and Thomas Kitchin to produce reduced-scale versions to cover the markets for medium and small-size atlases. The Royal English Atlas was published in c 1764 to target the medium-size market, and the Atlas Anglicanus followed for the small-scale market. Both copied the Large English Atlas in style, with rococo cartouches, and topographical notes surrounding the maps. The maps for the Atlas Anglicanus were first issued in monthly partworks between 1767 and 1768 before the complete atlas followed in 1768. Emanuel Bowen died in 1767, and his son Thomas took over the engraving of the remaining maps. Both Bowens are jointly cited as cartographers of the Middlesex map. Kitchin acted as publisher for the enterprise. There was a second edition of the atlas in c1777, before the plates passed to Carington Bowles and were updated and re-issued as Bowles' New Medium English Atlas in 1785. The Atlas Anglicanus was not a commercial success and maps from it are not commonly found.
Ref: MID 1404
 
E. Bowen    Royal English Atlas 1777 (c1764)
£185
40.5 x 49.5cm


The Royal English Atlas, first published around 1764, was probably an attempt to repeat the commercial success of The Large English Atlas, with a somewhat smaller format. The maps were again engraved by Kitchin and Bowen, and the partners in the enterprise were based around the consortium that had finally brought out The Large English Atlas in 1760. This time, however, they misjudged the market, and although there were some later re-issues of the atlas, the modern rarity of the maps suggests it was not very successful. This example, dated 1777, bears the publishers' imprint of R. Sayer,J. Bennett, J. Bowles and C. Bowles. Original outline colour. A few brown spots to the right-hand margin. Minor repairs to centrefold tears without loss. Slight browning to outer white margins. The verso has a hand-written poem celebrating the death of a famous poet (whose name is not given). This was probably written by the original owner. This does not show through to the recto.
Ref: DER 012
 
E. Bowen    General Magazine of Arts and Science 1759
£62
20 x 17.5cm


This map first appeared in the June 1759 number of Benjamin Martin's General Magazine of Arts and Sciences, a monthly partwork which between 1755 and 1762 issued a set of county maps. In 1763 those parts relating to natural history were collected together into 2 volumes with the county maps and offered under the title The Natural History of England. There were no later re-issues and the maps are not common. Mounted.
Ref: SUF 099
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£65
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions. This map covers the main offshore islands belonging to the English crown. Mounted and ready for framing.
Ref: ISL 002
 
E. Bowen    Royal English Atlas 1778 (c1764)
£450
50 x 40.5cm


The Royal English Atlas, first published around 1764, was probably an attempt to repeat the commercial success of The Large English Atlas, with a somewhat smaller format. The maps were again engraved by Kitchin and Bowen, and the partners in the enterprise were based around the consortium that had finally brought out The Large English Atlas in 1760. This time, however, they misjudged the market, and although there were some later re-issues of the atlas, the modern rarity of the maps suggests it was not very successful. This example, dated 1777, is from the second edition published in 1778, and is most attractively coloured.
Ref: COR 037
 
E. Bowen    The Large English Atlas 1764-79 (1756)
£175
53 x 70.5cm


This new series of maps was commenced in 1749, with maps sold singly until the last counties were completed and the full series issued in 1760 as the Large English Atlas. Buckinghamshire was first issued in 1756. The imprint on this example bears the names of R.Sayer, J. Bowles and T. Bowles, dating it to an atlas edition of c1762-64. Original outline colour. The map has been laid on card, and is supplied in an attractive new gold frame.
Ref: BUC 010
 
E. Bowen T. Bowen    Bowles New Medium Atlas c1795 (1767)
£145
32 x 22.5cm


This map first appeared in 1767 in the Atlas Anglicanus, published by Thomas Kitchin with maps engraved by Emanuel and Thomas Bowen. The maps copied the Large English Atlas in style, with rococo cartouches, and topographical notes surrounding the maps. The maps for the Atlas Anglicanus were first issued in monthly partworks between 1767 and 1768 before the complete atlas followed in 1768. Both Bowens are jointly cited as cartographers of the first state Shropshire map. There was a second edition of the atlas in c1777, before the plates passed to Carington Bowles and were updated and re-issued as Bowles' New Medium English Atlas in 1785. On Bowles' death the plates passed to his business successors, trading as Bowles and Carver, who re-issued the atlas sometime after 1793 with their own imprint as proprietors on individual maps. The Atlas Anglicanus was not a commercial success and maps from it are not commonly found. This example is from the atlas's final issue post 1793. Original colour.
Ref: SHR 009
 
E. Bowen T. Bowen    Royal English Atlas c1764
£250
40.5 x 50cm


The Royal English Atlas was probably an attempt to repeat the commercial success of The Large English Atlas, with a somewhat smaller format. The maps were again engraved by Kitchin and Bowen, and the partners in the enterprise were based around the consortium that had finally brought out The Large English Atlas in 1760. This time, however, they misjudged the market, and although there were some later re-issues of the atlas, the modern rarity of the maps suggests it was not very successful. This example is from the first edition, and is in original outline colour.
Ref: LIN 005
 
E. Bowen    Bowles New Medium Atlas 1785 (1767)
£95
22 x 32cm


This map first appeared in 1767 in the Atlas Anglicanus, published by Thomas Kitchin with maps engraved by Emanuel and Thomas Bowen. The maps copied the Large English Atlas in style, with rococo cartouches, and topographical notes surrounding the maps. The maps for the Atlas Anglicanus were first issued in monthly partworks between 1767 and 1768 before the complete atlas followed in 1768. Emanuel Bowen was named as the sole author on the first state of the Bedfordshire map, as is the case on some 10 others, but after his death in 1767, his son Thomas completed the series, most other maps citing both father and son jointly. There was a second edition of the atlas in c1777, before the plates passed to Carington Bowles and were updated and re-issued as Bowles' New Medium English Atlas in 1785. On Bowles' death the plates passed to his business successors, trading as Bowles and Carver, who re-issued the atlas sometime after 1793 with their own imprint as proprietors on individual maps. The Atlas Anglicanus was not a commercial success and maps from it are not commonly found. This example is from the atlas's 1785 issue by Bowles, for which individual map titles titles were changed, with Bowles name replacing that of Bowen. Original outline colour.
Ref: BED 045
 

UK and British Atlases

E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1751 (1720)
£1750
c11.5 x 18cm


The 4th edition of this important and popular road book.Original full leather binding, rather rubbed, and chipped at top and bottom of spine, but a good and clean copy internally. 53 maps of the English and Welsh counties, plus one of offshore islands. 200 pages of strip road maps.
Ref: ABR 855
 

Road Maps

E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 3/4 - High Wycombe, Tetsworth, Oxford, Islip, Morton-in-the-Marsh, Broadway. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 037
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 15/16 - Grantham, Newark, Tuxford, Doncaster. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 039
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 17/18 - Ferrybridge, Tadcaster, York, Boroughbridge, Northallerton. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 040
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 19/20 - Darlington, Durham, Chester-le-Street, Newcastle, Morpeth. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 154
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 23/24 - London, Colnbrook, Maidenhead, Reading, Newbury, Hungerford, Marlborough. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example is from the first edition of 1720. Top and right-hand margin trimmed obliquely a couple of millimetres within the printed area.
Ref: ROA 1472
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£17
11.5 x 17.5cm


Pages 29/30 - Wendover, Aylesbury, Buckingham, Banbury, Stratford, Caughton. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example is from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: ROA 1469a
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-1764
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 35/36 - Abingdon, Faringdon, Lechlade, Fairford, Gloucester, Mitcheldean, Monmouth. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 043
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 39/40 - Burton, Swansea, Llanelli, Kidwelli, Haverfordwest, St. Davids. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 044
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 43/4 - Sittingbourne, Preston (Faversham), Boughton St. Canterbury, Barham, Dover. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 046
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18.5cm


Pages 53/54 - Towcester, Daventry, Coventry, Coleshill, Lichfield. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 141
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 17cm


Pages 59/60 - London, Brentford, Hounslow, Staines, Egham, Bagshot. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. On this example the road map is printed on one side of the page only, the verso carrying part of the description of London.
Ref: ROA 048
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 63/64 - Shaftesbury, Sherborne, Yeoveil, Axminster, Exeter, Chudleigh. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 147
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 65/66 - Ashburton, Plymouth, Looe, Fowey, Tregony. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 051
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18.5cm


Pages 67/68 - Tregony, Penzanze, St. Buryon, Land's End. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example is from the first edition of 1720. It has a road map on one side only, the verso carrying part of the description of London.
Ref: ROA 052
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 75/76 - Woodgate, Lamberhurst, Hawkhurst Newended, Rye. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has a road map on one side only, the verso carrying part of the description of London.
Ref: ROA 054
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 79/80 - Maiden Bradley, Bruton, Bridgewater, Dulverton. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 055
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 81/82 - South Molton, Barnstaple, Torrington, Launceston, Camelford. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example is from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: ROA 056
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Brittania Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 93/94 - Garstang, Lancaster, Kendal. Perith, Carlisle. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.This example is from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: ROA 156
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 101/102 - Tempsford, St. Neots, Stilton, Peterborough. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. Modern colour.
Ref: ROA 150
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 17.5cm


Pages 103/104 - Market Deeping, Bourne, Sleaford, Lincoln, Brigg, Barton-upon-Humber. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 060
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
10 x 17.5cm


Pages 111/112 - Tenby, Ludlow, Bishop's Castle, Montgomery. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has a road map on one side only, the verso carrying a description of the Bedford Levels.
Ref: ROA 062
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 17.5cm


Pages 121/122 - Oakham, Melton Mowbray, Nottingham, Mansfield, Clowne, Rotherham, Barnsley. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 063
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 123/124 - Barnsley, Halifax, Keighley, Skipton, Kettlewell, Richmond. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. Modern colour.
Ref: ROA 139
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 145/146 - Hereford, Leominster, Ludlow, Church Stretton, Shrewsbury. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 068
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 149/150 - Bristol, Wells, Glastonbury, Taunton, Wellington, Exeter. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 069
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 17cm


Pages 161/162 - Jedburgh, Berwick / Carlisle, Berwick. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This sheet has the road map on one side only, the verso carrying a text description of Cambridge University. Modern colour.
Ref: ROA 160
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£15
9 x 16.5cm


Pages 165/166 - Llanfillyn, Tregynon, Llanbadarn, Fynydd, Builth Wells, Brecon. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 070
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 169/170 - Dartmouth, Newton Abbot, Exeter, Tiverton, Bampton, Mnehead. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 071
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-1764
£15
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 173/174 - Llanarth, Lyanrhystud, Talybont, Machynlleth, Llanymawddwy, Llangower, Llyn Tegid, . In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example is from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: ROA 143
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 175/176 - Bala, Betws, Gwerfil Goch, Ruthin, Holywell . In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has a road map to one side only, the verso carrying a description of Exeter.
Ref: ROA 073
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 195/196 - Ipswich, Norwich, Aylsham, Cromer. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 130
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 201/202 - King's Lynn, Billingford, Norwich, Great Yarmouth. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example is from the first edition of 1720.
Ref: ROA 1284
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 17.5cm


Pages 207/208 - Nottingham, Newark, Lincoln, Market Rased, Brigsley, Grimsby. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 138
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 219/220 - Oxford, Banbury, Coventry, Ashby, Derby. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 081
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11 x 17.5cm


Pages 225/226 - Presteigne, New Radnor, Builth Wells, Llandovery, Carmarthen. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 082
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18cm


Pages 231/232 - Tynemouth, Newcastle, Ovington, Hexham, Haltwhistle, Carlisle. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 083
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-1764
£17
11.5 x 17.5cm


Pages 241/242 - Elland, Riponden, Rochdale, Manchester, Warrington, Frodsham, Chester; and Manchester, Stockport, Disley. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 085
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11.5 x 18.5cm


Pages 245/246 - Carmarthen, Cardigan, Lampeter, Trefilan, Aberystwyth. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 086
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
11 x 18cm


Pages 253/254 - Exeter, Colyford, Lyme Regis, Chideock. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has a road map on one side only, the verso carrying descriptions of Dorchester and Lyme Regis.
Ref: ROA 088
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 257/258 - Leaming, Catterick, Richmond, Barnard Castle; and Ferrybridge, Pontefract, Wakefield; and Ferrybridge, Boroughbridge, Ripon. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions.
Ref: ROA 089
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£17
12 x 18cm


Pages 267/8 - Mold to Hoywell/Chester to Holywell. In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has the road maps on one side only, the verso being a county map of Durham (trimmed to the left hand border and uncoloured).
Ref: ROA 171