Copperplate

Cumberland : 21 items

Maps

J. Blaeu    Theatrum Orbis Terrarum 1647, 1648 or 1664 (1645)
£250
49.5 x 41cm


The Blaeu family were one of the leading Dutch map producers of the 17th century. Their major work was a multi volume world atlas initiated by Willem Blaeu and expanded by his son Joan. Their maps were beautifully designed and engraved, and are often found with original colour, making them most desirable to collectors. 1645 saw the first publication of volume 4 of the atlas, containing maps of England and Wales. There were several re-issues between then and 1672 when most of Blaeu's plates were lost in a fire which engulfed his Amsterdam premises. The Dutch text to the verso dates this example to the editions of 1647, 1648 or 1664.
Ref: CUM 011
 
R. Blome    Britannia 1673
£195
24 x 31.5cm


Originally intended as volume 3 of a larger cartographic project (The English Atlas), Richard Blome's Britannia was published alone in 1673. A rare second edition was issued in 1677. This Cumberland map is from the first edition of the work, and was dedicated to Charles Howard, Earl of Carlisle and Lord Lieutenant of the county of Cumberland. In return for his patronage of Blome's project Howard received this dedication on the county map, and also appeared in the list of the nobility and gentry of the county, his coat of arms being further included amongst the 816 illustrated in the volume. Very slight browning across the centrefold.
Ref: CUM 012
 
J. Ellis    Ellis's English Atlas 1766 (1765)
£80
19.5 x 25.5cm


Joseph Ellis's English Atlas was an entry into the market for small county atlases by its publishers Robert Sayer and Carington Bowles. The county maps were closely based upon those drawn by Thomas Kitchin for the 1763 topographical work England Illustrated, the major difference being the attractive vignettes which replaced Kitchin's rococco cartouches. The atlas was first published in 1765, and soon became a commercial success, running to many later editions. It was promoted as a travelling atlas, and made available in various formats. These included a version with the maps printed back to back on each page, as with this example from a 1766 edition which has a map of Cornwall on the reverse. A little light offsetting.
Ref: CUM 120
 
J. Cary    British Atlas 1805 (1789)
£55
51 x 40cm


This map was first published in 1789 as part of a set of county maps included in the new Gough translation of Camden's Britannia. These maps were subsequently re-issued in 1805 as the British Atlas, from which this example emanates (so distinguished by the centrefold). Original outline colour.
Ref: CUM 103
 
J. Lodge    Untitled Atlas of the English Counties c1795
£85
32 x 26cm


This was one of a set of county maps engraved by John Lodge and issued between 1787 and 1790 in The Political Magazine, and Parliamentary, Naval, Military and Literary Journal, published initially by John Murray, and later by R. Butters. The maps were subsequently collected together and re-issued as an atlas (without title page) around 1795. For this atlas edition the imprint with the publication date and engraver's and publisher's signatures was removed from the maps. This example is from the atlas edition. The maps are well engraved in the plainer style then coming into vogue. They are uncommon, and sought by collectors.
Ref: CUM 010
 
B. Capper    Topographical Dictionary of the UK 1808
£11
18 x 10.5cm


Benjamin Pitts Capper was the author of this topographical directory, first published by R. Phillips in 1808. The maps were engraved, and possibly drawn by H. Cooper. Later editions of the work carry the imprint of G.and W.B. Whittaker who re-published the book from 1825-34. This example is from the first edition of 1808, with the hundreds shown in original, full wash colour.
Ref: CUM 124
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£75
48 x 53.5cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour. A few light stains.
Ref: CUM 125
 
J. Pigot    British Atlas 1839-42 (1829)
£45
22 x 35cm


James Pigot & Co's county maps were issued in their British Atlas (from c1829), in several of their national and local business directories (from 1826 for the "home counties", at least), and singly in folding form as travelling maps. They were amongst the first maps to be printed from steel instead of copper plates, allowing more accurate fine detail and less wear to the plates over time. Atlas and directories went through several editions up to around 1857, later editions from 1846 being re-named Slater's New British Atlas, with imprints changed accordingly. Original outline colour.
Ref: CUM 127
 
A. Fullarton    The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1847 (1833)
£22
19 x 24cm


These maps were first published by Fullarton and Co. in 1833 in James Bell's New and Comprehensive Gazetteer of England and Wales which was re-issued three times in the 1830's. They were subsequently re-published (again by Fullarton) in 1840 in The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales, with several further re-issues up to 1849. The maps were engraved on steel and sometimes bear the name of the engraver and sometimes not. This example is from the Parliamentary Gazetteer of 1847 and bears the signature of R.Scott, though this may apply only to the engraving of the vignette of Carlisle.
Ref: CUM 128
 
J. Barclay T. Moule    Barclay's Universal English Dictionary 1852 (1837)
£50
20 x 26cm


Thomas Moule's antiquarian leanings are evident in this series of highly decorative county maps - a stylistic throwback in an age when cartographic work had become much plainer and more utilitarian. The maps were engraved by W. Smollinger, J. Bingley and J. Dower, and first appeared in Moule's English Counties Delineated, a partwork with text issued from 1830. They were subsequently made available as a complete work in 1837 under the same title, and were later re-issued in Barclay's Universal English Dictionary between 1842 and 1852. This latter work ran to several editions and the maps were often updated between editions to show the latest growth of the railway network. This example is from the 1852 edition of Barclay's Dictionary. Modern colour. Supplied mounted and ready to frame.
Ref: CUM 130
 
H. Teesdale R. Rowe    New British Atlas 1830 (1812-14)
£32
34 x 41cm


This detailed and well engraved map was one of a set first published around 1812-14 by Robert Rowe, who was probably also their draftsman and engraver. The maps were initially sold singly in folding format until their collective issue in 1816 as The English Atlas. The plates were later acquired by Henry Teesdale, who amended titles and imprints and re-issued the work as the New British Atlas in 1829, with several re-issues up to 1842. The plates were later acquired and used by H.G. Collins and then by G. Philip and Son, who both used them as the base for lithographic transfers for a variety of works up to c1860. This example is from the 1830 second edition of Teesdale's atlas. Original wash colour. One very short, marginal, repaired tear, not affecting the image.
Ref: CUM 006
 
B. Clarke R. Rowe    The British Gazetteer 1852 (1816)
£18
33.5 x 40.5cm


These maps first appeared in Rowe's English Atlas of 1816, being subsequently acquired by a succession of later publishers and used in a variety of their works. They were modified and updated during this time. This example is the second lithographic transfer for Clarke's British Gazetteer, published in 1852 by H.G. Collins. Folded and trimmed close against bottom right hand border to fit the volume. Repaired tear c 2 cm within right hand border.
Ref: CUM1155
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£35
16 x 18.5cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Cumberland and Westmorland is re-margined on one side and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the counties may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: CUM 009
 
T. Kitchin    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1789 (1750)
£45
17.5 x 19cm


This map was first published in the April 1750 edition of the London Magazine, which between 1747 and 1754 issued a complete set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin. The maps were later re-published by Alexander Hogg in Boswell's Antiquities of England & Wales, initially in partwork from c 1787-9, and then in several complete editions of the work up to 1798. This example of the Cumberland map is from the first complete edition of Boswell's Antiquities dating from c1789.
Ref: CUM 013
 
T. Murray    An Atlas of the English Counties 1830
£30
35.5.x 45cm


The title page of Murray's county atlas states that the maps were "Projected on the basis of the Trigonometrical Survey by order of the hon.ble The Board of Ordnance, under the superindendance of T.L. Murray". This might seem to imply the project had at least the official blessing, if not the active involvement of the Ordnance Survey, but is more likely to be a marketing puff. D. Hodson has suggested that the maps were copied from those of William Ebden published from 1825-8, both sets also being engraved by the same firm of Hoare & Reeves. Murray's Atlas was first published in 1830, with second and third editions in 1831 and 1832, the latter with the adddition of electoral data. by 1838 the plates had been acquired by W. Robson & Co. who published and sold the maps individually, and also used them in their commercial directories. This example is from the first edition of 1830. Original colour.
Ref: CUM 007
 
R. Ramble W. Darton    Reuben Ramble's Travel's through the Counties of England 1845
£50
15 x 19cm


These maps (without the decorative borders) were first issued in 1821 in Miller's New Miniature Atlas. The plates were later acquired by William Darton who re-issued them as a miniature atlas, but also used the maps, now further embellished by country scenes, in this children's work. Reuben Ramble is an invented character. Original colour to the illustrations.
Ref: CUM 014
 

Topographical prints - other areas

A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
17.5 x 30.5cm


Derwenwater, Broad Water and Windermere. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print offers views of Cumbrian lakes. At the time it was taken the English Lake District was just beginning to find a wider audience for its picuresque beauty. Broad Water was the old name applied to two of the lakes - Bassenthwaite and Brothers Water. As this view of Broadwater is designated as in Westmorland it relates to the latter of the two.
Ref: TOP 116
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 32cm


Naworth Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Naworth Castle is located close to Brampton, and was built in the late 13th century. It is today the private residence of Philip Howard, brother to the Earl of Carlisle. It is not open to the public but can be hired for private functions. This print was engraved by J.G. Wooding and is supplied with the original, accompanying text page from the work.
Ref: TOP 243
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16 x 10.5cm


Carlisle Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Carlisle Cathedral began life as an Augustinian Priory in 1122, but was soon promoted to cathedral status in 1133. It is one of the smallest cathedrals in the country, its nave having been partly demolished during the civil war. This print was engraved by Goldar after a drawing by Hamilton, and is suppplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 244
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 32.5cm


Lanercost Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Lanercost Priory, near Brampton was originally an Augustinian foundation by Robert de Vaux, dating from c1169. Part of the priory church is still in use as the parish church, and the rest of the church survives, but without its roof. Most of the other monastic building have disappeared, but the site is today managed by English Heritage.. This print was engraved by J. Gooding and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 245
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
15 x 11cm


Castlerigg Stone Circle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Castlerigg stone circle is a Neolithic monument built around 3000BC, and is located in a spectacular location, surrounded by high mountains a few miles east of Keswick. This anonymous print is supplied with the original accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 246