Copperplate

Hampshire : 19 items

Maps

W. Hole    Camden's Britannia 1637 (1607)
£295
31.5 x 29cm


The first five editions of Camden's successful history and topography of Britain were without maps, but for the sixth edition of 1607 the engravers William Hole and William Kip were commissioned to provide a set of maps of the counties of England and Wales, plus 3 general maps of the countries comprising the new "United Kingdom". These maps were retained for the subsequent 1610 and 1637 editions. They are based on the earlier work of Saxton, Norden, Smith and Owen. This attractively coloured example is from the 1637 edition.
Ref: HAM 011
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£65
11.5 x 18.0cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month time-frame between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen). It also included a set of English and Welsh county maps as well as the road maps, all of which were engraved by Emanuel Bowen.The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions.
Ref: HAM 003
 
T. Kitchin    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1789 (1751)
£60
21.5 x 17cm


This map was first published in the February 1751 edition of the London Magazine, which between 1747 and 1754 issued a complete set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin. The maps were later re-published by Alexander Hogg in Boswell's Antiquities of England & Wales, initially in partwork from c 1787-9, and then in several complete editions of the work up to 1798. This example of the Hampshire map is from the first complete edition of Boswell's Antiquities dating from c1789.
Ref: HAM 022
 
J. Ellis    Ellis's English Atlas 1766 (1765)
£75
25 x 19.5cm


Joseph Ellis's English Atlas was an entry into the market for small county atlases by its publishers Robert Sayer and Carington Bowles. The county maps were closely based upon those drawn by Thomas Kitchin for the 1763 topographical work England Illustrated, the major difference being the attractive vignettes which replaced Kitchin's rococco cartouches. The atlas was first published in 1765, and soon became a commercial success, running to many later editions. It was promoted as a travelling atlas, and made available in various formats. These included a version with the maps printed back to back on each page, as with this example from a 1766 edition which has a map of Gloucestershire on the reverse.
Ref: HAM 225
 
J. Lodge    Untitled Atlas of the English Counties c1795
£115
32.5 x 26cm


This was one of a set of county maps engraved by John Lodge and issued between 1787 and 1790 in The Political Magazine, and Parliamentary, Naval, Military and Literary Journal, published initially by John Murray, and later by R. Butters. The maps were subsequently collected together and re-issued as an atlas (without title page) around 1795. For this atlas edition the imprint with the publication date and engraver's and publisher's signatures was removed from the maps. This example is from the atlas edition. The maps are well engraved in the plainer style then coming into vogue. They are uncommon, and sought by collectors.
Ref: HAM 020
 
H. Teesdale R. Rowe    New British Atlas 1830 (1812-14)
£55
34 x 41cm


This detailed and well engraved map was one of a set first published around 1812-14 by Robert Rowe, who was probably also their draftsman and engraver. The maps were initially sold singly in folding format until their collective issue in 1816 as The English Atlas. The plates were later acquired by Henry Teesdale, who amended titles and imprints and re-issued the work as the New British Atlas in 1829, with several re-issues up to 1842. The plates were later acquired and used by H.G. Collins and then by G. Philip and Son, who both used them as the base for lithographic transfers for a variety of works up to c1860. This example is from the 1830 second edition of Teesdale's atlas. Original wash colour.
Ref: HAM 016
 
A. Perrot    L'Angleterre, ou Description Historique et Topographique du Royaume de la Grande-Bretagne 1824-35
£95
6.5 x 11cm


The text for this French topographical work on Britain was written by George Depping, the maps being drawn by Aristide Perrot and engraved by A. Migneret. It was first published in 1824, with subsequent editions in 1828 and 1835, this copy being from the second edition of 1828. The maps often cover more than one county as in this example which also includes Wiltshire. The surrounding decorative border shows the typical produce and wares of the counties. Original outline colour
Ref: HAM 002
 
J. Pigot    British Atlas 1839-42 (1829)
£60
22 x 36cm


James Pigot & Co's county maps were issued in their British Atlas (from c1829), in several of their national and local business directories (from 1826 for the "home counties", at least), and singly in folding form as travelling maps. They were amongst the first maps to be printed from steel instead of copper plates, allowing more accurate fine detail and less wear to the plates over time. Atlas and directories went through several editions up to around 1857, later editions from 1846 being re-named Slater's New British Atlas, with imprints changed accordingly. Original outline colour.
Ref: HAM 231
 
A. Fullarton    The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1847 (1833)
£30
24 x 18.5cm


These maps were first published by Fullarton and Co. in 1833 in James Bell's New and Comprehensive Gazetteer of England and Wales which was re-issued three times in the 1830's. They were subsequently re-published (again by Fullarton) in 1840 in The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales, with several further re-issues up to 1849. The maps were engraved on steel and sometimes bear the name of the engraver and sometimes not. This example is from the Parliamentary Gazetteer of 1847 and bears the signature of Gray & Son as engravers.
Ref: HAM 232
 
R. Blome    Britannia 1673
£295
26 x 30cm


Originally intended as volume 3 of a larger cartographic project (The English Atlas), Richard Blome's Britannia was published alone in 1673. A rare second edition was issued in 1677. This map of Rutland is from the first edition of the work, and was dedicated to Charles Paulet, known then as Lord St. John, but who succeeded to the title of sixth Marquess of Winchester in 1675. In return for his patronage of Blome's project Paulet received this dedication on the county map, and also appeared in the list of the nobility and gentry of the county, his coat of arms being further included amongst the 816 illustrated in the volume.
Ref: HAM 023
 
J. Wallis S. Oddy    Wallis's New Britlish Atlas 1813
£40
27 x 18cm


James Wallis's New British Atlas was first published in 1813 by S.A. Oddy. There was a second edition in 1816. This example is from the first edition and is dated 1812 on the imprint. It is in attractive, original, full wash colour, and in good condition.
Ref: HAM 1541
 
J. van Langeren T. Jenner    A Book of the Names of all Parishes, Market Towns, Villages, Hamlets and Smallest Places in England and Wales 1668-c1680 (1643)
£85
10.5 x 10cm


The history of this road book begins in 1635 when Van Langeren engraved the plates for the first edition published by Matthew Simmons under the title A Direction for the English Traviller. Distance tables dominated each county page, with only tiny thumbnail maps. In 1643 Thomas Jenner published a new edition for which the plates were re-engraved with much larger maps replacing the thumbnails. There were several later editions, some under the changed title A Booke of the Names of all Parishes, Market Towns, Villages, Hamlets and Smallest Places in England and Wales. Maps published under this title have the addition of text below the map, listing places in the county. The work was last published around 1680. Despite the many editions maps from it are not common. This copy probably dates from an edition of the work between 1668 and 1680.
Ref: HAM 007
 

Topographical prints - other areas

A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 33cm


Portsmouth - The Town and Harbour. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Portsmouth grew in importance as a town and a naval base from the 15th century. This print offers two views on one sheet. A little foxing which could be totally hidden by mounting within the border.
Ref: TOP 083
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 12cm


Portchester Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Portchester Castle stands at the north end of Portsmouth Harbour onthe site of a Roman fort. It was probably built in the late 11th century, but has, since then enjoyed periods of rebuilding, extension and decline, serving both as a royal residence and as a gaol. It is today managed by English Heritage and is open to the public. This print was engraved by Sparrow.
Ref: TOP 264
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 14.5cm


The Priory of St. Dionysius, Southampton. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Priory of St. Dionysius (also known as St. Denys or St. Denis) was founded by King Henry I in1184. It was situated some 3 miles north of the city centre. After the dissolution of the monasteries decay and stone robbing have meant that only a few fragments of the original priory buildings survive today. This print, engraved by Richardson, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A few ligt spots.
Ref: TOP 266
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
16 x 10.5cm


Winchester Cathedral. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Winchester Cathedral is of Norman foundation, begun in 1079 and consecrated in 1093, when the adjacent Old Minster which it repaced, was demolished. It is one of the largest cathedrals in the country and houses the tombs of a number of notables, including Saxon Kings, St. Swithun, and Jane Austen. This print was engraved by Thornton and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 267
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16.5 x 11cm


Christchurch Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The site of today's parish church has housed religious buildings since around 800AD. The Normans constructed today's church in the first half of the 12th century. It was originally a secular minster, but became an Augustinian Priory in 1150. After the dissolution of the monasteries most of the monastic buildings were demolished, but the Priory Church survived as the parish church. This print was engraved by Sparrow. A couple of spots to the margin, but otherwise good.
Ref: TOP 268
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 14.5cm


Southampton - The Water Gate. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Watergate was one of 8 gates forming part of the medieval defences of Southampton. The town was attacked and badly damaged by the French in 1338, after which Edward III ordered new walls and defences to be built. The Water Gate was one of these, and still survives, leading from the Norman Castle out onto Town Quay. This print was engraved by Eastgate.
Ref: TOP 269
 
Anon.    Picturesque Europe c1875/6
£10
23 x 17cm


In the New Forest, Lymington. Picturesque Europe was a serialised partwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print does not give a specific location but the drawing was taken in the forest near Lymington. It was drawn by J.W. Whymper, but the engraver's name is hard to read (possibly Raynes).
Ref: TOP 206