Copperplate

Westmorland : 27 items

Maps

W. Kip    Camden's Britannia 1637 (1607)
£200
31 x 26.5cm


The first five editions of Camden's successful history and topography of Britain were without maps, but for the sixth edition of 1607 the engravers William Hole and William Kip were commissioned to provide a set of maps of the counties of England and Wales, plus 3 general maps of the countries comprising the new "United Kingdom". These maps were retained for the subsequent 1610 and 1637 editions. They are based on the earlier work of Saxton, Norden, Smith and Owen. This example is from the 1637 edition.
Ref: WES 723
 
R. Morden    Camden's Britannia 1695
£110
41.5 x 36cm


Camden's Britannia - a history and topography of Britain - was first published in 1586 and had a long and successful publication history. County maps by Kip and Hole were addded in 1607, and these also appeared in the editions of 1610 and 1637. Over 50 year's later it was decided to issue a new and updated edition. The original Latin text was re-translated by Edmund Gibson, and Robert Morden was commissioned to provide a new set of county and general maps in a more modern style. The revised work was issued in 1695. There were 4 further editions of the Gibson/Morden work, the last in 1772, before a further updated version by Richard Gough was launched in 1789, with new maps by John Cary. This example is from the first Gibson edition of 1695. Repair to short lower centrefold tear.
Ref: WES 724
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720
£35
11.5 x 18cm


In 1720 Thomas Bowles and Emanuel Bowen published a new reduced version of John Ogilby's strip maps. Britannia Depicta came hot on the heels of the two reduced editions issued the previous year by Thomas Gardner and John Senex, but was much more innovative. Where Gardner and Senex had closely followed the strip layout and design of Ogilby, the new work further reduced the size of the volume, by including only 3 or 4 strips per page, and by printing on both sides of the page, but also added a considerable amount of additional detail by way of historical and topographical notes and heraldry. This additional information turned the work into much more than just a road book - it was virtually a guide book. This added detail was researched and provided by John Owen, who passed it to Bowen to incorporate into the layout and engraving of the pages. The work also included a set of English and Welsh county maps. Britannia Depicta became a great commercial success, and was re-issued a number of times up to 1764, with occasional amendments and additions. This example has a road map to the verso showing the road from York to Pickering via Malton..
Ref: WES 009
 
S. Simpson    The Agreeable Historian 1746
£50
19 x 16cm


The Agreeable Historian was a weekly partwork, intended to be bound into 3 volumes when completed. It was issued in 109 parts beween December 1743 and December 1745, with the final title page being dated 1746. The work was a topographical review of the counties of England, being published by R. Walker, with Samuel Simpson cited as the author.
Ref: WES 011
 
J. Ellis    Ellis's English Atlas 1766 (1765)
£55
25 x 19.5cm


Joseph Ellis's English Atlas was an entry into the market for small county atlases by its publishers Robert Sayer and Carington Bowles. The county maps were closely based upon those drawn by Thomas Kitchin for the 1763 topographical work England Illustrated, the major difference being the attractive vignettes which replaced Kitchin's rococco cartouches. The atlas was first published in 1765, and soon became a commercial success, running to many later editions. It was promoted as a travelling atlas, and made available in various formats. These included a version with the maps printed back to back on each page, as with this example from a 1766 edition which has a map of Warwickshire on the reverse.
Ref: WES 727
 
J. Cary    New and Correct English Atlas 1809 (1787)
£24
26 x 21cm


The last decades of the 18th century saw less emphasis being placed on the traditions of decorative mapmaking in favour of a plainer style and design. Foremost amongst this new wave of "modern" cartographers and engravers was John Cary. The New and Correct English Atlas was Cary's first major production as a publisher in his own account. The maps were not only clearly and elegantly drawn and engraved, but also set new standards in accuracy in taking advantage of all the new large-scale county surveys of the second half of the 18th century. The atlas was first published in 1787, with a re-issue in 1793. By 1808 the plates were well worn, and the engraving of a new set was begun. The next dated edition of 1809, from which this example comes, utilised these new plates. Original outline colour.
Ref: WES 728
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£55
48.5 x 39.5cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state. Repaired centrefold tear.
Ref: WES 729
 
J. Aiken    England Delineated 1790
£13
14.5 x 10cm


John Aikin (or Aiken) wrote this topographical work for children in order "to make my young countrymen better acquainted than they are usually found to be with their native land". The first edition of 1788 did not include county maps, but these were added for the second edition of 1790, from which this example comes. The work was published by Joseph Johnson, but the maps are unsigned. There were four later editions of the book with the maps, and one without. The Westmorland map is fairly simple, befitting the needs of its target audience, and the text may be available at no extra charge.
Ref: WES 730
 
C. Smith    New English Atlas 1808 (1804)
£75
50 x 45cm


Charles Smith was a successful London publisher and map-seller, whose work is stylistically very similar to that of John Cary. His large format New English Atlas first came to market in 1804, but many of the maps have also been found in folding format and may have been sold individually before the publication of the atlas. Smith's maps were well designed and accurate, making use of the large scale county surveys of the previous half-century. The atlas was a commercial success and was up-dated and re-published regularly until c1865 (the latter editions produced by lithographic transfer). This example is from the 1808 second edition, and is in bright and original full colour.
Ref: WES 731
 
B. Capper    Topographical Dictionary of the UK 1808
£11
18 x 10.5cm


Benjamin Pitts Capper was the author of this topographical directory, first published by R. Phillips in 1808. The maps were engraved, and possibly drawn by H. Cooper. Later editions of the work carry the imprint of G.and W.B. Whittaker who re-published the book from 1825-34. This example is from the first edition of 1808, with the hundreds shown in original, full wash colour.
Ref: WES 732
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£75
53.5 x 48cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour. Repaired marginal tear to top centrefold not affecting the printed area.
Ref: WES 733
 
C. Greenwood    Atlas of the Counties of England 1834 (1830)
£120
69.5 x 58cm


Original full colour. Short repaired marginal tear at top of sheet, not affecting the printed area. Some light offsetting and a minor printer's crease impinging on bottom left border, but still a respectable example. The Greenwoods surveyed all the counties from 1817-33 for their beautifully engraved county atlas finally published in 1834. Maps were also sold singly as produced. The Westmorland map is corrected to 1830, and this example was sold in atlas format.
Ref: WES 735
 
A. Fullarton    The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1847 (1833)
£28
24 x 19.5cm


These maps were first published by Fullarton and Co. in 1833 in James Bell's New and Comprehensive Gazetteer of England and Wales which was re-issued three times in the 1830's. They were subsequently re-published (again by Fullarton) in 1840 in The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales, with several further re-issues up to 1849. The maps were engraved on steel and sometimes bear the name of the engraver and sometimes not. This example is from the Parliamentary Gazetteer of 1847 and lacks an engraver's signature. Supplied mounted and ready to frame.
Ref: WES 736
 
J. Barclay T. Moule    Barclay's Universal English Dictionary 1842 (1837)
£40
26 x 20cm


Thomas Moule's antiquarian leanings are evident in this series of highly decorative county maps - a stylistic throwback in an age when cartographic work had become much plainer and more utilitarian. The maps were engraved by W. Smollinger, J. Bingley and J. Dower, and first appeared in Moule's English Counties Delineated, a partwork with text issued from 1830-32. They were subsequently made available as a complete work in 1837 under the same title, and were later re-issued in Barclay's Universal English Dictionary between 1842 and 1852. This latter work ran to several editions and the maps were often updated between editions to show the latest growth of the railway network. This example in modern colour is from the 1842 edition of Barclay's Dictionary in which the maps are usually found close trimmed. A few light spots.
Ref: WES 737
 
J. Barclay T. Moule    Barclay's Universal English Dictionary 1852 (1837)
£40
26 x 20cm


Thomas Moule's antiquarian leanings are evident in this series of highly decorative county maps - a stylistic throwback in an age when cartographic work had become much plainer and more utilitarian. The maps were engraved by W. Smollinger, J. Bingley and J. Dower, and first appeared in Moule's English Counties Delineated, a partwork with text issued from 1830-32. They were subsequently made available as a complete work in 1837 under the same title, and were later re-issued in Barclay's Universal English Dictionary between 1842 and 1852. This latter work ran to several editions and the maps were often updated between editions to show the latest growth of the railway network. This example is from the 1852 edition of Barclay's Dictionary.
Ref: WES 738
 
J. Duncan    A Complete County Atlas of England and Wales 1840-45 (1825)
£35
44 x 34.5cm


Coloured. These maps were first published in 1825, and probably sold singly. In 1833 they were re-published by James Duncan in a thematic atlas to illustrate the representative changes brought about by the 1832 Reform Act. There were later re-issues in 1840 and 1845 with the addition of railways, and this map dates from one of these editions.
Ref: WES 1123
 
C. Smith    New English Atlas 1828 or 1833 (1822)
£32
23.5 x 19cm


In 1822 Charles Smith issued a county atlas with maps based on his larger county maps which had been in circulation for over 20 years. The new maps were smaller in scale, but the atlas bore the same title as that in which his larger maps appeared. They are clearly drawn and engraved, but although there were several editions of the atlas, they are today amongst the rarer of the 18th century county maps. This example is from the edition of 1828 or 1833, in which the maps have no date in the imprint, but before railways were added for the edition of 1844. Original outline colour.
Ref: WES 005
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£35
16 x 18.5cm


The New British Traveller was originally issued as a weekly partwork by the publisher Alexander Hogg, commencing in 1783. Once the series of 60 parts was completed in 1784 title pages were provided for the pages to be bound in a single volume. The work is a topographical review of Great Britain, containing numerous prints and a set of county and general maps. The maps are of varying sizes, being typically arranged 2,3 or 4 to a single page, with adjoining borders. When separated this means individual maps will be trimmed to the border on one or two sides and are often re-margined for mounting and framing. The map of Westmorland and Cumberland is re-margined on one side and sold ready-mounted. The text pages for the counties may be available on request at no extra charge.
Ref: CUM 009
 
J. Wallis S. Oddy    Wallis's New Britlish Atlas 1813
£32
26 x 17.5cm


James Wallis's New British Atlas was first published in 1813 by S.A. Oddy. There was a second edition in 1816. This example is from the first edition and is dated 1812 on the imprint. It is in attractive, original, full wash colour, and in good condition.
Ref: WES 1579
 
T. Murray    An Atlas of the English Counties 1830
£4
45 x 35.5cm


The title page of Murray's county atlas states that the maps were "Projected on the basis of the Trigonometrical Survey by order of the hon.ble The Board of Ordnance, under the superindendance of T.L. Murray". This might seem to imply the project had at least the official blessing, if not the active involvement of the Ordnance Survey, but is more likely to be a marketing puff. D. Hodson has suggested that the maps were copied from those of William Ebden published from 1825-8, both sets also being engraved by the same firm of Hoare & Reeves. Murray's Atlas was first published in 1830, with second and third editions in 1831 and 1832, the latter with the adddition of electoral data. by 1838 the plates had been acquired by W. Robson & Co. who published and sold the maps individually, and also used them in their commercial directories. This example is from the first edition of 1830. Original colour. Repairs to a couple of marginal tears and to two others entering the top border by 1-2 cm. A small marginal nick, and slight staining to the centre extremity of the lower margin. Slight creasing. Priced accordingly.
Ref: WES 007
 
J. Lodge    Untitled Atlas of the English Counties c1795
£52
32 x 25.5cm


This was one of a set of county maps engraved by John Lodge and issued between 1787 and 1790 in The Political Magazine, and Parliamentary, Naval, Military and Literary Journal, published initially by John Murray, and later by R. Butters. The maps were subsequently collected together and re-issued as an atlas (without title page) around 1795. For this atlas edition the imprint with the publication date and engraver's and publisher's signatures was removed from the maps. This example is from the atlas edition. The maps are well engraved in the plainer style then coming into vogue. They are uncommon, and sought by collectors.
Ref: WES 001
 
J. Walker R. Creighton    View of the Representative History of England 1835
£17
22.5 x 18cm


This work was published in 1835 as a companion volume to Lewis's Topographic Dictionary. It contains county and borough maps, drawn by R. Creighton and engaved by J.& C. Walker, and was designed to show the electoral and boundary changes effected by the 1832 Reform Act. There were 2 issues of the work in 1835 and 1840, this example of the county map being from the 1835 first edition. Original outline colour.
Ref: WES 006
 

Topographical prints - other areas

A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
23.5 x 16.5cm


Appleby Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Appleby Castle was founded by Ranulph de Meschines in c1170. From 1269 until 1653 it was the home of the powerful Clifford family, before its conversion to a more comforatble mansion by its next owner the Earl of Thanet. Since then a new wing has been added and further updatings have occurred. Itis today a private residence, but pre-booked, private tours can be arranged.
Ref: TOP 140
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
17.5 x 30.5cm


Derwentwater, Broad Water and Windermere. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print offers views of 3 Cumbrian lakes. At the time it was taken the English Lake District was just beginning to find a wider audience for its picuresque beauty. Broad Water was the old name applied to two of the lakes - Bassenthwaite and Brothers Water. As this view of Broadwater is designated as in Westmorland it relates to the latter of the two.
Ref: TOP 116
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
10 x 19cm


Kendal Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Kendal Castle was built in the late 12th century by the Lancaster family, Baron's of Kendal. Its last enhabitant was probably William Parr, Baron of Kendal, and grandfather to Catherine Parr, who married King Henry VIII in 1543. By that time the Castle had been abandoned to decay. The site is today owned by the South Lakeland District Council who allow free access to the scant ruins. This print, engraved by Lowry, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 391
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 14.5cm


Shap Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Shap Abbey was a Premonstratensian house, built 1199 in a remote spot on the banks of the River Lowther a couple of miles from Shap. After the dissolution of the monasteries the site was robbed for stone to build Shap's Market Hall and Lowther Castle, but the impressive tower of the Abbey church still stands with other ruins. The site is owned today by the National Trust with free public access.
Ref: TOP 392
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 14.5cm


Brougham Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Brougham Castle lies c2 miles from Penrith, and was founded by Robert de Viexpont in the early 13th century.. In the 1260's it passed by marriage to the Clifford family, later Earls of Cumbria, who held is as one of their properties until 1676. It then passed to the Tufton family, Earls of Thanet, but was poorly maintained and eventually abandoned to decay. By the late 18th century it was a romantic, picturesque ruin. The Castle is today in the care of English Heritage and open to the public. This print, engraved by Coote, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 393