Copperplate

Wiltshire : 23 items

Maps

W. Kip    Camden's Britannia 1637 (1607)
£230
35 x 28cm


The first five editions of Camden's successful history and topography of Britain were without maps, but for the sixth edition of 1607 the engravers William Hole and William Kip were commissioned to provide a set of maps of the counties of England and Wales, plus 3 general maps of the countries comprising the new "United Kingdom". These maps were retained for the subsequent 1610 and 1637 editions. They are based on the earlier work of Saxton, Norden, Smith and Owen. This example is from the 1637 edition. Modern colour.
Ref: WIL 007
 
J. Blaeu    Tooneel des Aerdrycks, oft Nieuwe Atlas 1647-64 (1645)
£410
49.5 x 41cm


The Blaeu family were one of the leading Dutch map producers of the 17th century. Their major work was a multi volume world atlas initiated by Willem Blaeu and expanded by his son Joan. Their maps were beautifully designed and engraved, and are often found with original colour, making them most desirable to collectors. 1645 saw the first publication of volume 4 of the atlas, containing maps of England and Wales. There were several re-issues between then and 1672 when most of Blaeu's plates were lost in a fire which engulfed his Amsterdam premises. The Dutch text to the verso dates this example to the editions of 1647, 1648 or 1664. Original colour. Some marginal spotting, but away from the printed area.
Ref: WIL 740
 
E. Bowen J. Owen    Britannia Depicta 1720-64
£45
11.5 x 18cm


Britannia Depicta was one of 3 pocket-sized reductions of Ogilby's road book that appeared within an 18 month timeframe between 1719 and 1720. It was more innovative than the others in including much additional topographical and historical information (researched by John Owen) on the maps. The work was a commercial success and ran to many later editions.Supplied mounted.
Ref: WIL 011
 
J. Ellis    Ellis's English Atlas 1766 (1765)
£55
19 x 25cm


Joseph Ellis's English Atlas was an entry into the market for small county atlases by its publishers Robert Sayer and Carington Bowles. The county maps were closely based upon those drawn by Thomas Kitchin for the 1763 topographical work England Illustrated, the major difference being the attractive vignettes which replaced Kitchin's rococco cartouches. The atlas was first published in 1765, and soon became a commercial success, running to many later editions. It was promoted as a travelling atlas, and made available in various formats. These included a version with the maps printed back to back on each page, as with this example from a 1766 edition which has a map of Worcestershire on the reverse.
Ref: WIL 743
 
J. Cary    Camden's Britannia 1806 (1789)
£65
40.5 x 52cm


Camden's Britannia was first published in 1586. County maps by Kip and Hole were first added in 1607, being supplanted by those of Robert Morden for the 5 editions from 1695 to 1772. In 1789 a new translation of the work by Richard Gough was published by T. Payne and G. & J. Robinson with updated and modernised maps by John Cary. The same maps were also later used in Cary's New British Atlas of 1805. They can be found uncoloured, with outline colour and with full wash colour. This example is from the second Gough edition of Britannia, published in 1806, and the maps are in full wash colour - the most desirable state.
Ref: WIL 745
 
C. Smith    New English Atlas 1808 (1804)
£90
44 x 49cm


Charles Smith was a successful London publisher and map-seller, whose work is stylistically very similar to that of John Cary. His large format New English Atlas first came to market in 1804, but many of the maps have also been found in folding format and may have been sold individually before the publication of the atlas. Smith's maps were well designed and accurate, making use of the large scale county surveys of the previous half-century. The atlas was a commercial success and was up-dated and re-published regularly until c1865 (the latter editions produced by lithographic transfer). This example is from the 1808 second edition, and is in bright and original full colour.
Ref: WIL 747
 
J. Cary    New English Atlas 1811 (1809)
£90
48 x 54cm


It is suprising that Cary's large county atlas was issued as late as 1809, as individual maps from it seem to have been sold singly from 1801. The atlas format was perhaps to compete with the similarly sized atlas of Charles Smith, which went under the same title and was published in 1804. It is perhaps Cary's finest production, the maps being notable for their fine design, detail and engraving. The atlas ran to several later editions by Cary, and the plates were later used for a variety of lithographic transfers by G.F. Cruchley. This example is from the second edition of 1811, and is in original full colour.
Ref: WIL 749
 
J. Pigot    British Atlas 1839-42 (1829)
£50
22 x 36cm


James Pigot & Co's county maps were issued in their British Atlas (from c1829), in several of their national and local business directories (from 1826 for the "home counties", at least), and singly in folding form as travelling maps. They were amongst the first maps to be printed from steel instead of copper plates, allowing more accurate fine detail and less wear to the plates over time. Atlas and directories went through several editions up to around 1857, later editions from 1846 being re-named Slater's New British Atlas, with imprints changed accordingly. Original outline colour.
Ref: WIL 750
 
A. Perrot    L'Angleterre, ou Description Historique et Topographique du Royaume de la Grande-Bretagne 1824-35
£95
6.5 x 11cm


The text for this French topographical work on Britain was written by George Depping, the maps being drawn by Aristide Perrot and engraved by A. Migneret. It was first published in 1824, with subsequent editions in 1828 and 1835, this copy being from the second edition of 1828. The maps often cover more than one county as in this example which also includes Hampshire. The surrounding decorative border shows the typical produce and wares of the counties. Original outline colour
Ref: HAM 002
 
J. Barclay T. Moule    Barclay's Universal English Dictionary 1852 (1837)
£50
20 x 26cm


Thomas Moule's antiquarian leanings are evident in this series of highly decorative county maps - a stylistic throwback in an age when cartographic work had become much plainer and more utilitarian. The maps were engraved by W. Smollinger, J. Bingley and J. Dower, and first appeared in Moule's English Counties Delineated, a partwork with text issued from 1830-32. They were subsequently made available as a complete work in 1837 under the same title, and were later re-issued in Barclay's Universal English Dictionary between 1842 and 1852. This latter work ran to several editions and the maps were often updated between editions to show the latest growth of the railway network. This example is from the 1852 edition of Barclay's Dictionary. The map has been recently coloured, and a new photo will shortly be available on this website, but can be sent immediately on request to prospective customers.
Ref: WIL 753
 
J. Walker    British Atlas 1854-6 (1837)
£20
32 x 38.5cm


The Walker's British Atlas was first issued in 1837, and ran to many subsequent editions with frequent updates to railways and other information. This example is from the editions of 1854 or 1856 - so dated from the railways shown, the publisher's imprints, and the population figures quoted. Full wash colour.
Ref: WIL 1195
 
B. Clarke R. Rowe    The British Gazetteer 1852 (1816)
£35
34 x 41cm


These maps first appeared in Rowe's English Atlas of 1816, being subsequently acquired by a succession of later publishers and used in a variety of their works. They were modified and updated during this time. This example is the second lithographic transfer for Clarke's British Gazetteer, published in 1852 by H.G. Collins. Folded and trimmed close against bottom right hand border to fit the volume. A tiny repaired tear just impinging c 2 mm within the right hand border.
Ref: WIL 1196
 
J. Jansson    Atlas Novus 1646-66 (1646)
£550
49.5 x 39.5cm


Jan Jansson was one of Amsterdam's leading 17th century mapmakers, and a close rival to the Blaeu family. His multi-volume world atlas first saw the introduction of 6 maps of individual English counties into the German edition of 1636, and a further 11 of English and Welsh counties in the Dutch edition of 1644. But when Jansson saw the 1645 Blaeu volume with more decorative maps covering all the English and Welsh counties, he felt obliged to revise his existing plates and complete the set in order to compete. His new volume covering England and Wales was first published in the 1646 Latin text edition of the Atlas Novus. There were several later editions by Jansson, and later by Schenk and Valk who acquired the plates. This example is in original full colour.
Ref: WIL 1225
 
J. Wallis S. Oddy    Wallis's New Britlish Atlas 1813
£35
18 x 25.5cm


James Wallis's New British Atlas was first published in 1813 by S.A. Oddy. There was a second edition in 1816. This example is from the first edition and is dated 1813 on the imprint. It is in attractive, original, full wash colour, and in good condition.
Ref: WIL 1582
 
J. Lodge    Untitled Atlas of the English Counties c1795
£78
25.5 x 32cm


This was one of a set of county maps engraved by John Lodge and issued between 1787 and 1790 in The Political Magazine, and Parliamentary, Naval, Military and Literary Journal, published initially by John Murray, and later by R. Butters. The maps were subsequently collected together and re-issued as an atlas (without title page) around 1795. For this atlas edition the imprint with the publication date and engraver's and publisher's signatures was removed from the maps. This example is from the atlas edition. The maps are well engraved in the plainer style then coming into vogue. They are uncommon, and sought by collectors.
Ref: WIL 002
 
J. Walker R. Creighton    View of the Representative History of England 1835
£19
18.5 x 25cm


This work was published in 1835 as a companion volume to Lewis's Topographic Dictionary. It contains county and borough maps, drawn by R. Creighton and engaved by J.& C. Walker, and was designed to show the electoral and boundary changes effected by the 1832 Reform Act. There were 2 issues of the work in 1835 and 1840, this example of the county map being from the 1835 first edition. Original outline colour. A couple of light brown spots.
Ref: WIL 004
 
C. Smith    New English Atlas (reduced edition) 1828/1833 (1822)
£35
18.5 x 23.5cm


In 1822 Charles Smith issued a county atlas with maps based on his larger county maps which had been in circulation for over 20 years. The new maps were smaller in scale, but the atlas bore the same title as that in which his larger maps appeared. They are clearly drawn and engraved, but although there were several editions of the atlas, they are today amongst the rarer of the 18th century county maps. This example is from the edition of 1828 or 1833, in which the maps have no date in the imprint, but before railways were added for the edition of 1844. Original outline colour.
Ref: WIL 012
 
H. Teesdale R. Rowe    New British Atlas 1830 (1812-14)
£30
34 x 41cm


This detailed and well engraved map was one of a set first published around 1812-14 by Robert Rowe, who was probably also their draftsman and engraver. The maps were initially sold singly in folding format until their collective issue in 1816 as The English Atlas. The plates were later acquired by Henry Teesdale, who amended titles and imprints and re-issued the work as the New British Atlas in 1829, with several re-issues up to 1842. The plates were later acquired and used by H.G. Collins and then by G. Philip and Son, who both used them as the base for lithographic transfers for a variety of works up to c1860. This example is from the 1830 second edition of Teesdale's atlas. Original wash colour. Slight waterstaining.
Ref: WIL 014
 
T. Murray    An Atlas of the English Counties 1830
£30
35.5 x 45.5cm


The title page of Murray's county atlas states that the maps were "Projected on the basis of the Trigonometrical Survey by order of the hon.ble The Board of Ordnance, under the superindendance of T.L. Murray". This might seem to imply the project had at least the official blessing, if not the active involvement of the Ordnance Survey, but is more likely to be a marketing puff. D. Hodson has suggested that the maps were copied from those of William Ebden published from 1825-8, both sets also being engraved by the same firm of Hoare & Reeves. Murray's Atlas was first published in 1830, with second and third editions in 1831 and 1832, the latter with the adddition of electoral data. by 1838 the plates had been acquired by W. Robson & Co. who published and sold the maps individually, and also used them in their commercial directories. This example is from the first edition of 1830. Original colour. A repaired marginal tear just touching the bottom-left-corner of the border.
Ref: WIL 015
 

Topographical prints - other areas

A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
16 x 15cm


Salisbury. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Modern Salisbury originated from the removal of the bishop's seat from nearby Old Sarum, to a new site to the south. The new cathedral, built in the Earley English Gothic style, was begun in 1220 and mostly complete by 1280. The town grew up around it, receiving its royal charter and city status in 1227. It is notable for having the tallest spire of any British cathedral, and by the 14th century had grown to be the largest settlement in Wiltshire. The print has some worm holes and foxing to the margins, which could be hidden by judicious mounting as per our image.
Ref: TOP 143
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14cm


Malmesbury Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Malmesbury Abbey was founded as a Benedictine house in the late 7th centry AD, and the town of Malmesbury grew up around it. The current Abbey was constructed in the 12th century, and mostly complete by 1180. Two major collapses in the 16th century - to the main tower and the west tower - caused great damage to other parts of the fabric, resulting in the shortening of the church. After the dissolution of the monasteries the surviving part became the parish church, and continues to fulfil that role today. This print, engraved by Peltro is supplied with the original, accompanying text. A slight crease.
Ref: TOP 395
 
Author not known.   The European Magazine 1805
£12
14 x 10cm


Salisbury from the London Road . The European Magazine was published from 1792 until 1826, eventually building into 89 volumes. It offered a range of content and competed with the Gentleman's Magazine and others. This engraving of Salisbury was engraved by S.Rawle after I. Nixon, and was issued in 1805. Modern Salisbury originated from the removal of the bishop's seat from nearby Old Sarum, to a new site to the south. The new cathedral, built in the Earley English Gothic style, was begun in 1220 and mostly complete by 1280. The town grew up around it, receiving its royal charter and city status in 1227. It is notable for having the tallest spire of any British cathedral, and by the 14th century had grown to be the largest settlement in Wiltshire.
Ref: TOP 188
 
Author not known.   Great Britain Illustrated 1830
£15
14.5 x 9cm


Calne, from the Canal. Great Britain Illustrated was published in 1830 by Charles Tilt. It featured 118 steel engravings after drawings by the prominent landscape artist William Westall. The supporting text was written by Thomas Moule. This print of the canal at Calne was engraved by E. Francis. The market town of Calne has Anglo Saxon origins, and prospered due to its situation on the busy London-Bristol road. In the 18th century it also enjoyed a stong position in wool, and cloth weaving. Its economic prospects were further enhanced when it was linked to the canal network in 1810, linking it to London and other markets. This print underlines the importance of that link, which only closed in 1914.
Ref: TOP 398