Copperplate

(Topographical prints - other areas) : 177 items
J. Morphew    Magna Britannia et Hibernia 1720
£35
21.5 x 16cm


The Royal Palace and Town of Windsor. Magna Britannia et Hibernia was originally issued as a 92 part topographical work between 1714 and 1731, but gradually also made available in 6 finished, bound volumes. The publisher was J. Morphew. The text, county map and prints realting to Berkshire first appeared in July 1715, but this example is from volume 1 of the bound work with a title-page date of 1720. The print, which has no signatures of authorship, shows the castle and town of Windsor as a bird's eye view.
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J. Morphew    Magna Britannia et Hibernia 1720 (1715)
£30
21.5 x 16cm


Windsor Castle. Magna Britannia et Hibernia was originally issued as a 92 part topographical work between 1714 and 1731, but gradually also made available in 6 finished, bound volumes. The publisher was J. Morphew. The text, county map and prints realting to Berkshire first appeared in July 1715, but this example is from volume 1 of the bound work with a title-page date of 1720. The print, which has no signatures of authorship, shows Windsor castle from the north across the Thames.
Ref: TOP 019
 
Author not known.   The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
18.5 x 13.5cm


St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This print, in good condition, was engraved by Thornton, and is supplied with the original text.
Ref: TOP 230
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
16.5 x 27.5cm


Reading Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The ruins of the abbey and its associated buildings still stand in the centre of the modern town where Reading Council has plans to restore and develop the site. This print was engraved by Page, and is supplied with the original accompanying text. A couple of light brown spots.
Ref: TOP 235
 
Anon.    Source Unknown c1860?
£5
19.5 x 14cm


Cumnor Place, Wytham. Cumnor Place was originally a grange (outlying farm) belonging to Abingdon Abbey. It dated from the 14th cnetury, but was finally demolished by the Earl of Abingdon in 1810. This etching bears no signatures, and its source publication has not been identified.
Ref: TOP 172
 
Anon.    The Beauties of England and Wales 1810
£12
19 x 13cm


Temple House, Bisham. The Beauties of England and Wales was a topographical partwork issued in 18 volumes between 1801 and 1815. It was initially published by Vernor & Hood and later by J. Harris. This print of Temple House was engraved by G. Cooke after a drawing S. Owen, and appeared in 1810. The house was built by Samuel Wyatt for Thomas Mils in the late eighteenth century. It was demolished in 1932.
Ref: TOP 006
 
Author not known.   The Copper Plate Magazine 1794
£12
cm


Bulstrode. The Copper Plate Magazine was a monthly magazine which ran from 1782 to 1804 as a vehicle for picturesque topographical prints. This print of Bullstrode House was engraved by Corbould after a drawing by Walker, and is dated 1794. Bulstrode Park lies just to the NW of Gerrards Cross. The infamous Judge Jefferys acquired the estate in 1676 and rebuilt the pre-existing house as a more imposing red-brick mansion. This house was later partly demolished and remodelled in 1860 by the then owner the 12th Duke of Portland. His house is still extant under the prersent ownership of the Worldwide Evangelization Crusade. A little light foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 011
 
Author not known.   The Copper Plate Magazine 1794
£12
16.5 x 12cm


Langley Park. The Copper Plate Magazine was a monthly magazine published from 1792 to 1804 as a vehicle for picturesque, topographical engravings. This print was engraved by Walker after a drawing by Corbould, and is dated 1794. Langley Park was built between 1756 and 1758 for the 3rd Duke of Marlborough. The house and gardens are today owned by Buckinghamshire County Council. The house is let out as offices, but the park is open to the public.
Ref: TOP 012
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£5
17.5 x 15cm


Gothurst. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Gothurst (or Gayhurst) House is Elizabethan in date, though its estate dates back to the Norman conquest. The house is c4 miles from Newport Pagnell and survives today, having been converted into individual residential properties in the 1970's. This print was engraved by Lodge. A little foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 114
 
Author not known.   The Beauties of England and Wales 1802
£12
15 x 11cm


Stoke Park. The Beauties of England and Wales was a topographical partwork issued in 18 volumes between 1801 and 1815. It was initially published by Vernor & Hood and later by J. Harris. This print of Stoke Park House was engraved by J. Hawkins after P. Mann & J. Britton. The house, near Stke Poges, was designed by James Wyatt in1788 forJohn Penn. It survives today as a hotel and country club. The print is supplied mounted and ready for framing.
Ref: TOP 009
 
Author not known.   The Beauties of England and Wales 1810
£12
19 x 13cm


Harleyford House. The Beauties of England and Wales was a topographical partwork issued in 18 volumes between 1801 and 1815. It was initially published by Vernor & Hood and later by J. Harris. This print was engraved by W. Cooke after a drawing by S. Owen, and appeared in the work in 1810. Harleyford House stands on the banks of the Thames near Marlow. The original manor house was replaced by a new Georgian villa in 1753. The house survives today and is rented out as offices.
Ref: TOP 004
 
Author not known.   The Beauties of England and Wales 1809
£12
19 x 13cm


Medmenhan Abbey. The Beauties of England and Wales was a topographical partwork issued in 18 volumes between 1801 and 1815. It was initially published by Vernor & Hood and later by J. Harris.This print was engraved by S. Middiman after a drawing by S. Owen and appeared in the work in 1809. Medmenham Abbey, beside the river Thames was a 12th century Cistercian Abbey, the ruins of which were used by the infamous Hellfire Club as their headquarters. They have today been incorporated into a private residence. A little browning to the margins of the print which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 008
 
Author not known.   The Beauties of England and Wales 1810
£12
18.5 x 12.5cm


Taplow House. The Beauties of England and Wales was a topographical partwork issued in 18 volumes between 1801 and 1815. It was initially published by Vernor & Hood and later by J. Harris. This print was engraved by G. Cooke after a drawing by S. Owen, and appeared in the work in 1810. Taplow House was built in 1751, and survives today as a hotel.
Ref: TOP 007
 
Author not known.   The Beauties of England and Wales 1810
£12
15 x 11cm


Gothurst. The Beauties of England and Wales was a topographical partwork issued in 18 volumes between 1801 and 1815. It was initially published by Vernor & Hood and later by J. Harris. This print was drawn and engraved by J. Storer and appeared in the work in 1810. Gothurst (or Gayhurst) House is Elizabethan in date, though its estate dates back to the Norman conquest. The house is c4 miles from Newport Pagnell and survives today, having been converted into individual residential properties in the 1970's.
Ref: TOP 003
 
J. Cary    The Gentleman's Magazine 1810
£12
16.5 x 10cm


Beaconsfield Church. The Gentleman's Magazine was a long-runningand popular 18th century magazine which covered a wide range of subjects. This print of the church at Beaconsfield was engraved by J. Cary after a drawing by W. Hamper, and appeared in the magazine in 1810. It is supplied mounted, ready for framing.
Ref: TOP 002
 
Author not known.   The Seats of the Nobility and Gentry in Great Britain and Wales 1793
£12
18.5 x 14.5cm


Chalfont House. William Angus was an engraver who between 1787 and 1797 issued serially a number of engravings of stately homes under the above title. Angus published the work himself, as well as engraving all the plates after drawings by a variety of artists. Chalfont House, in Chalfont St. Peter, was built in 1755 in the Gothic style by J. Chute. It is today owned by the British Aluminium Company. There are a few light spots to the print, mostly marginal and likely to be hidden once mounted.
Ref: TOP 017
 
Author not known.   The History of Windsor and its Neighbourhood 1813
£12
21.5 x 16cm


View from Cliefden (Cliveden). The History of Windsor and its Neighbourhood was authored by the architect J. Hakewill who also provided the drawings for the 21 plates and 14 vignettes. These were engraved by a variety of hands, and the work was published by E. Lloyd in 1813. This plate is of the famous view of the Thames from the south terrace of Cliveden House, now owned by the National Trust but operating as a luxury hotel.
Ref: TOP 015
 
B. Clarke    The British Gazetteer 1852
£15
20.5 x 11.5cm


Wolverton Viaduct on the London and North Western Railway. The British Gazetteer was authored by B. Clarke and published by H.G. Collins in 1852. Apart from topographical text listings, it included a set of county maps (originally by Rowe), and a small series of railway prints after drawings by J.F. Burrell. This print was engraved by A. Ashley and shows the imposing viaduct built in 1838 to carry the line over the valley of the River Ouse.
Ref: TOP 1487
 
J. Cassell    Our Own Country c1880-98
£10
19.5 x 14cm


Great Marlow from Quarry Woods. Our Own Country was a topographical partwork published serially by Cassell & Co. from c 1800, and as a complete work in 1898. This wood-block print was engraved by H. Werdmuller after a drawing by G.L. Seymour. Later colour.
Ref: TOP 010
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22.5 x 34.5cm


Barnwell and Chesterton. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. At the time this print was taken, Barnwell and Chesterton were independent villages, but have since become suburbs of Cambridge. No artist's or engraver's signatures. A narrow right-hand margin, but with sufficient space to mount.
Ref: TOP 1433
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£5
24.5 x 16.5cm


Castle Camps. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Castle Camps was a Norman castle, around which grew the current village of the same name. It gradually fell into disrepair, and little today remains above ground, some of the wall being incorporated into Castle Farmhouse. The print bears no artist's or engraver's signatures. A few spots to the outer extremities of the wide margins.
Ref: TOP 109
 
Author not known.   The Beauties of England and Wales 1812
£8
15 x 11cm


The Twin Churches of Swaffham Prior. The Beauties of England and Wales was a topographical partwork issued in 18 volumes between 1801 and 1815. It was initially published by Vernor & Hood, and later by J. Harris. This print was engraved by Scott after a drawing by Thompson, but has been mis-titled as "Swaffham Churches, Norfolk". It actually illustrates the two churches at Swaffham Prior in Cambridgeshire. These two churches stand next to each other in the same churchyard, apparently originally intended to serve two congregations in a village divided between two manors. Today St. Mary's is used as the parish church and St. Cyriac's is redundant but still standing. A little light foxing to the margins of the print, which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 183
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
23 x 35.5cm


East Gate, Chester; Sonne Gate, Coventry and Castle Ashby, Northants. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers 3 views on one sheet. Narrow vertical borders and a nick to the upper-left border.
Ref: TOP 153
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
22.5 x 33.5cm


Beeston Castle and Nantwich Church. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Beeston Castle was built in the 1220's by Ranulph de Blondeville, Earl of Chester. It was slighted by Cromwell during the civil war, and its ruins are today owned by English Heritage, who open it to the public. St. Mary's Church at Nantwich is one of the country's finest medieval churches and is grade 1 listed. Two prints on one sheet engraved by Lodge. A few brown spots and worm holes to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 138
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£20
30.5 x 22cm


The City of Chester. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This attractive print of Chester from across the river Dee bears no engraver's or artist's signatures. A couple of small worm holes and some light foxing to the margins, which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 1588
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
27 x 17.5cm


Lestwithiel Palace. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Stannary Palace at Loswithiel was built by the Earls of Cornwall in the second half of the 13th century. It comprised several buildings with a variety of functions - law courts, taxation of the Cornish lead industry, a gaol, seat of the Stanarry Parliament, and general administration. Although badly damaged in the civil war several of the buildings have survived or been restored and remain in use today - still with various uses. This ananymous print shows the ruins of the Great Hall and another building - possibly the Exchequer Hall. A couple of small holes and some light foxing to the margin, all of which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 142
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
17.5 x 30.5cm


Derwenwater, Broad Water and Windermere. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print offers views of Cumbrian lakes. At the time it was taken the English Lake District was just beginning to find a wider audience for its picuresque beauty. Broad Water was the old name applied to two of the lakes - Bassenthwaite and Brothers Water. As this view of Broadwater is designated as in Westmorland it relates to the latter of the two.
Ref: TOP 116
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 32cm


Naworth Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Naworth Castle is located close to Brampton, and was built in the late 13th century. It is today the private residence of Philip Howard, brother to the Earl of Carlisle. It is not open to the public but can be hired for private functions. This print was engraved by J.G. Wooding and is supplied with the original, accompanying text page from the work.
Ref: TOP 243
 
B. Clarke    The British Gazetteer 1852
£10
21.5 x 14cm


Derby - the Great Central Railway Station. The British Gazetteer was authored by B. Clarke and published by H.G. Collins in 1852. Apart from topographical text listings, it included a set of county maps (originally by Rowe(, and a small series of railway prints after drawings by J.F. Burrell. This print was engraved by C. Cole and shows the Grand Central Station which opened in 1844. In the 1830's 3 different railway companies were considering lines to or through Derby, and in 1836 the City Council successfully persuaded them to work together on the provision of one shared station, rather than one for each line. This collaboration also ended with the 3 companies amalgamating to form the Midland Railway in 1844, with the new station as their HQ, and Derby's sucess as a railway town was assured. The station was extensively remodelled in 1952 and again in 1985, when the remnants of the Victorian staion were demolished. A water stain to the right margin of the print which would be mostly hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 1495
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
24.5 x 15cm


Exeter. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers a perspective of Exeter from the south west.
Ref: TOP 082
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
24.5 x 16.5cm


Tavistock Abbey. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Tavistock Abbey was first founded in 961, though it had to rebuilt twice and most of the later buildings dated from the 15th century. It was a Benedictine foundation, located in the centre of the modern town of Tavistock. After the dissolution of the monasteries it fell graduallly into disrepair, was robbed of much of its stone, and the site rebuilt on. Today a few buidings from the complex survive, including the refectory, 2 gateways and a porch. This print has a little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 085
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 33.5cm


Mount Edgecumbe & Plymouth Docks. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Mount Edgecombe is a promontary on the west bank of the river Tamar looking across Plymouth Sound to the modern dockyards and city beyond. It gets its name from the Edgecumbe family whose estate was here located. Edgecumbe House and its grounds are now jointly owned by Cornwall and Plymouth Councils and are open to the public. St. Nicolas Island from where the first view is taken is now known as Drake's Island. Two prints on one sheet - a little foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 084
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 33cm


Dartmouth Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784
Ref: TOP 083
 
B. Clarke    The British Gazetteer 1852
£8
20 x 14.5cm


Ivy Bridge Viaduct - South Devon Railway. The British Gazetteer was authored by B. Clarke and published by H.G. Collins in 1852. Apart from topographical text listings, it included a set of county maps (originally by Rowe and a small series of railway prints after drawings by J.F. Burrell. Ivybridge is a small town about 9 miles east of Plymouth and standing on the River Erme. The South Devon Railway chose to route its line between Exeter and Plymouth via the town, spanning the river with an impressive viaduct built by Brunel in 1848. This was replaced by a new viaduct in 1892/3, but the granite piers of Brunel's original still remain.This print was engraved by A. Ashley. Some waterstains to the vertical margins, which could be mostly hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 1491
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
23 x 15.5cm


Blandford Forum - the principal street. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print showing the town's main street, was one of two adjacent views on one sheet. It has been remargined to the top where separated from its twin.
Ref: TOP 108
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
21.5 x 32cm


Sherborne, Northampton and Lichfield. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print shows panoramic views of 3 towns spread across the country, including the Dorset town of Sherborne. The Sherborne view is stated to have been taken from Jerusalem hill, with the town just visible in the distance. A little light foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 152
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
31 x 20cm


High Force on the River Tees. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. High Force is a waterfall on the River Tees, neat Middleton-in-Teesdale. The river forms the boundary beween Durham and North Yorkshire and the falls are impressive, especially when in full spate.
Ref: TOP 126
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
24.5 x 16.5cm


Durham Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Durham Castle is of Norman origin, and was built in the 11th century. It stands high upon a hill that is the town's citadel, facing the Cathedral and looking down upon the River Wear. Since 1840 it has been used by Durham University, who run tours for public access.
Ref: TOP 051
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
24.5 x 15.5cm


Lumley Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Lumley Castle was built in 1389 by Sir Ralph Lumley as a remodelling of his manor house. Since then it has served as the seat of the Bishop of Durham, and as accommodation for students at Durham University, but is now a luxury hotel on the outskirts of Chester-le-Street. This print has a little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 129
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
18.5 x 15.5cm


Wanstead House. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Palladian mansion of Wanstead House was built in 1715 by Sir Richard Child, whose ancestors beacame one of the richest families in England. When the male line died out in 1805 the house and vast estates were inherited by 16 year old Catherine Tylney-Long. Catherine unfortunately made a bad marriage and by 1820 her husband had squandered her fortune and run up huge debts. The house was sold in 1822 and shortly afterwards completely demolished and sold piece-meal to pay his creditors. Part of the grounds survive today as a municipal park.
Ref: TOP 128
 
Anon.    The History and Topography of the County of Essex c1831
£15
15.5 x 11.5cm


Waltham Abbey. The History and Topgraphy of the County of Essex was a serialised partwork, authored by T. Wright, which was issued from 1831. This print shows the Abbey Church and surrounding buildings, and was engraved by Barber after a drawing by W.H. Bartlett.
Ref: TOP 170
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
19.5 x 15cm


Bristol. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print has been remargined to the top border where separated from another view on the same sheet. A little marginal foxing which would be mostly hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 112
 
Anon.    The Beauties of England and Wales 1804
£8
10 x 14cm


Tewkesbury Abbey. The Beauties of England and Wales was a topographical partwork issued in 18 volumes between 1801 and 1815. It was initially published by Vernor & Hood, and later by J. Harris. This print was engraved by R. Roffe from a drawing by J. Burden. An Anglo-Saxon monastery once stood on the Abbey site from the 8th century, but the building of the present Abbey church was begun in 1102 in the Norman style. After the dissolution of the monasteries it became the parish church.
Ref: TOP 181
 
Anon.    Griffith's History of Cheltenham and its Vicinity 1838
£8
14.5 x 9.5cm


Sandywell Park, the seat of Walter Lawrence, near Cheltenham. Samuel Young Griffith's book covers the topography and history of Chentenham and the surrounding country to a radius of c30 miles. Sandywell Park is located a few miles to the SE of Chetenham. The house was build around 1704 for Henry Brett, with wings being added some 20 years later. Griffith's text states that further improvements had been made by the then-present owner, Walter Lawrence. The house survives today as private, residential apartments. Some copies of Griffith's work were graced by proof copies of the prints on superior paper, and this print is marked as such. It was engraved by W. Radclyffe after drawings by C. Barber and H. Lamb. A little foxing, but not too noticeable.
Ref: TOP 157
 
B. Clarke    The British Gazetteer 1852
£7
10 x 12cm


Bristol - the Terminus of the Great Western Railway. The British Gazetteer was authored by B. Clarke and published by H.G. Collins in 1852. Apart from topographical text listings, it included a set of county maps (originally by Rowe), and a small series of railway prints after drawings by J.F. Burrell. This print was engraved by A. Ashley and shows Temple Meads Station, the western terminuse of the Great Western Railway from London. The station was designed in the gothic style by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, and first opened in 1840. Its architecture is much admired today. Some waterstaining to the print but not too obtrusive.
Ref: TOP 1492
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 33cm


Portsmouth - The Town and Harbour. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Portsmouth grew in importance as a town and a naval base from the 15th century. This print offers two views on one sheet. A little foxing which could be totally hidden by mounting within the border.
Ref: TOP 083
 
Anon.    Picturesque Europe c1875/6
£10
23 x 17cm


In the New Forest, Lymington. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print does not give a specific location but the drawing was taken in the forest near Lymington. It was drawn by J.W. Whymper, but the engraver's name is hard to read (possibly Raynes).
Ref: TOP 206
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
17.5 x 31.5cm


Brompton Brian and Goodrich Castles. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. This print, engraved by Lowry, offers two views on one sheet. Brampton Bryan Castle in NW Herefordshire guards the Teme valley route from Ludlow into central Wales. It was first mentioned in Domesday Book. Since 1294 it has been owned by the Harley family, but fell into decay after damage in 2 civil war sieges. Goodrich Castle stands on the River Wye to the south of the county, and dates from the mid 12th century. It was also besieged in the civil war and subsequently sleighted. Its ruins are owned and opened to the public by English Heritage.The print is supplied with the original accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 276
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
22 x 18cm


Gorhambury House. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print shows Old Gorhambury House, an Elizabethan mansion close to St. Albans. This house was replaced by a new Palladian mansion built between 1777 and 1784, after which the old house was left to decay. Its ruins are today maintained by English Heritage with free public access. The new house survives as the home of the Earl of Verulam. For ease of mounting the print is remargined to the lower border where separated from an adjoing view.
Ref: TOP 117
 
Anon.    The European Magazine 1797
£10
16 x 11.5cm


Otter's Pool, Watford. The European Magazine was published from 1792 until 1826, eventually building into 89 volumes. It offered an range of content and competed with the Gentleman's Magazine and others. There are no artist or engraver's signatures, the imprint bearing only the name of the publisher J. Sewell, who founded the magazine. Otterspool is a small settlement on the river Colne to the east of Watford town centre. It was clearly once a rural idyll.
Ref: TOP 189
 
B. Clarke    The British Gazetteer 1852
£7
20.5 x 13cm


The Bridgewater Monument, Ashridge Park. The British Gazetteer was authored by B. Clarke and published by H.G. Collins in 1852. Apart from topographical text listings, it included a set of county maps (originally by Rowe), and a small series of railway prints after drawings by J.F. Burrell. This print was engraved by A. Ashley, and shows the Bridgewater Monument in the grounds of Ashridge Park. The monument was erected in 1832 as a monument to the 3rd Duke of Bridgewater, whose family owned the estate, and who was a great canal builder. Much of Ashridge Park, including the site of the monument which can be climbed by an interior staircase, is now owned by the National Trust and is open to the public free of charge.
Ref: TOP 182
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
23 x 33.5cm


Gravesend and Woolwich from the Thames. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers 2 views of north Kent towns from the river. The bottom-left corner of the white margin is missing, but the print would still frame up successfully.
Ref: TOP 097
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
19.5 x 23cm


Foots Cray Place and Hayes Place. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Foots Cray Place, near Sidcup, was built in 1754 for Bourchier Cleve. The property was ravaged by fire in 1949, and demolished the following year. Hayes Place was the home of the elder and younger Pitt, who both became Prime Minister. The property was bought by Pitt the elder in 1754 and remodelled. Later owners demolished the house in 1933 for redevelopment. The print was a waterstain to the top-right border, and some marginal foxing. Both faults would be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 121
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
23 x 34.5cm


Chelsea from Battersea & the Thames at Northfleet. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers two views, both featuring the River Thames. Narrow right-hand margin.
Ref: TOP 098
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22 x 17cm


Canterbury. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Some foxing and worm holes to the margins of the print, which could be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 144
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
19 x 30cm


Barfreston Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Barfreston is a small village between Canterbury and Dover, which has as its parish church, one of the best preserved Norman churches in England. It dates from the 12th century, and is too small to have its own belltower, this difficiency being remedied by hanging the bell ina nearby yew tree and ringing it from within the church by a series of levers. This print was engraved by Peltre.
Ref: TOP 285
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£7
19 x 31.5cm


The Grand Door of Barfreston Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically two (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Barfreston is a small village between Canterbury and Dover, which has as its parish church, one of the best preserved Norman churches in England. It dates from the 12th century, and is too small to have its own belltower, this difficiency being remedied by hanging the bell ina nearby yew tree and ringing it from within the church by a series of levers. This print was engraved by Peltre.
Ref: TOP 286
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1875/6
£10
21.5 x 16.5cm


At Coney Hill, Hayes Common, Kent. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print shows a view on Hayes Common, a 79 hectare open space now in the London Borough of Bromley. Hayes Common was the first common to be given protection from enclosure and development under the Metropolitan Commons Act of 1866. This print bears a signature which is unfortunately hard to decipher - possibly Yetell? It appeared in part 6 of the work in 1875/6.
Ref: TOP 207
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1875/6
£10
15.5 x 24cm


Tomb of the Black Prince, Canterbury Cathedral. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print shows the Tomb of the Black Prince in Canterbury Cathedral. Prince Edward was the eldest son of King Edward III, and much famed for his military prowess at the battle of Crecy and Poitirs against the French.He died in 1376 - one year before his father - probably from a long term illness most likely to be amoebic dysentry. This print was engraved by J.W. Whymper after a drawing by P. Skelton. A slight stain.
Ref: TOP 212
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
33 x 21cm


Lancaster. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Lancaster's origins go back to the establishment of a Roman fort on the site of its later castle.It became a borough in 1193, and was prospering at the time of this print, growing to become the country's busiest port in the 19th century. It was given city status in 1937. This print shows the River Lune in the foreground, with the town and the sea beyond. A couple of small worm holes to the lower margin and a little marginal foxing, which would be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 139
 
A. Fullarton    The Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales 1866-9
£8
17.5 x 10.5cm


Liverpool from the Mersey. Archibald Fullarton first published The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales in 1840, with several further re-issues up to 1849. Its successor from 1866 to at least 1874 was titled The Imperial Gazetteer.... which, unlike the Parliamentary Gazetter, had no county maps, but featured the odd steel engraved plate, including this seascape of the Mersey backed by Liverpool. The print was engraved by R.B. Scott after a drawing by J.C. Brown. Some spotting.
Ref: TOP 171
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
23 x 34.5cm


Leicester and Lincoln. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers views of two East Midlands cities. Both were important Roman towns, built on or near the sites of earlier tribal capitals. Leicester's Roman name was Ratae Coritanorum, and Lincoln's was Lindum Colonia. The 2 views could be separated and separately mounted, as indicated by the images.
 
Anon.    Principaux Monuments Gothiques de l'Europe 1841
£90
51 x 66.5cm


Lincoln Cathedral. Gustave Simonau, the engraver of this large print, was brought up in London where he studied painting and lithography before moving to Brussels in c1830. He was a major figure in 19th century watercolour and lithography media. Between 1838 and 1943 he produced a very large set of lithographs of European cathedrals and churches built in the Gothic style, including 5 of English cathedrals. The set was published by his father's lithographic company in 1843 under the title given. This fine example from the set is of Lincoln cathedral, and is dated 1841. It is printed on thick paper, and has been trimmed at the bottom resulting in the removal of the subject title, but leaving the lithographer and publisher's signatures. Slight loss to the white margins at two of the corners, not affecting the printed area.
Ref: TOP 492
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
17.5 x 31cm


Lambeth Palace & Westminster Abbey and St. Margaret's Church. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Lambeth Palace sits on the south bank of the Thames, and is the London residence of the Archbishop of London. The complex has been rebuilt and extended over the centuries, with the earliest surviving part being Lollards Tower, dating from 1435-40. The first Westminster Abbey was founded by Edward the Confessor, but the present building was begun in 1245, with work continuing until 1517. The two western towers were addded by Hawksmoor between 1722 and 1745. The Abbey has been used for all royal coronations since 1066. This print, engraved by Taylor, offers two views on one sheet. Some marginal foxing and a nick to the lower margin would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 102
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
23 x 34.5cm


Mortlake and Hammersmith from the Thames. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print is the ideal present for a fan of the University Boat Race offering views of the mid-way and finishing points of the race. Narrow right-hand margin, but enough to mount successfully. A little browning affecting the lower-right margin.
Ref: TOP 101
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
27 x 17.5cm


The Thames and the stairs at York Buildings, London. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print is taken from the spot where York House, one of the great Thameside Mansions on the Strnad once stood. The watermen's stairs known as York stairs were build to an elaboarte Italianate design around 1626, and still survive, though now located in the Embankment Gardens some way away from the river. At the time they were built York House was owned by The de Vililers family, Dukes of Buckingham. The second Duke sold the house for redevelopment in 1672, and the new buildings on the site were collectively called York Buildings. A little marginal foxing to the print would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 099
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22 x 34cm


The Bishop of London's seat at Fulham, & Lord Stormont's House, Wandsworth. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Fulham Palace was the residence of the Bishops of London from the early 8th century. In 1973 the Bishop's seat was relocated and the old palace became a museum, with its grounds now used as a botanic garden and allotments. The Lord Stormont here referred to was the 7th Viscount Stormont, David Murray. The family seat was at scone, but Murry needed a residence near London to pursue his political career, and chose this viilla on Wandsworth Hill, probably leased from Lady Rivers. He later became the Earl of Mansfield in 1793, inheriting Kenwood House. Two prints on one sheet. A little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 092
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
21.5 x 32cm


Gunnersbury House, Wanstead House, and a detail from Bethlehem Hospital. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers 3 views. Gunnersbury House was a Palladian mansion in Brentwood built sometime prior to 1742 for John Maynard. The house shown here was demolished in 1801, when the estate was sold and split into two, resulting in its replacement by 2 new houses. These still stand in Gunnersbury Park. Wanstead House was another Palladian mansion, completed 1722 for Sir Richard Child. It was demolished in 1825 when the site was sold to pay the gambling debts of the then owner William Wellesley-Pole. Bethlehem (or Bedlam) Hospital dates back to a foundation of 1347, and is Europe's oldest psychiatric hospital. At the time of this print (which shows a detail from the gateway) it occupied an impressive building in Moorfields which had opened in 1676. The hospital moved to a new site in Southwark in 1815. A little marginal worming and foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 090
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
18.5 x 32.5cm


Sion House & Kenwood House. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Syon House was built in the mid 16th century for the Duke of Somerset, being subsequently acquired by the Percy Family, Dukes of Northumberland, in1594. It continues as the family's residence today, and is open to the public. Kenwood (originally Caen Wood) House in Hampstead was built in the early 17th century, and in 1754 was acquired by William Murray, Ist Earl Mansfield, who engaged Robert Adam to remodel and add to it in the 1760's and 70's. In 1925 it was purchaed by Lord Iveagh who gave it to the nation 2 years later, and it is today administered by English Hertitage who open it to the public. Two views on one print. A light stain to the lower title.
Ref: TOP 091
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1764
£10
22.5 34cm


Kensington Palace, Ranelagh & Vauxhall Gardens. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Kensington Palace was built c1605 as a Jacobean mansion. It was bought by King William IV and Quenn Mary II in 1689, was remodelled and extended by Wren and became the main royal residence in London until 1860, since when it has been the home of junior and lesser members of the royal family. Vauxhall and Ranelaugh were London's two great "Pleasure Gardens", offering a garden walks, food and drink and a range of entertainments, including musical concerts in rotundas. They were popular venues for assignations between the sexes. Vauxhall opened to the public in c1660 and Ranelaugh in1742. Thier heyday was the 18th century, with both being closed by the mid 1800's. Both survive as garden - at least in part - as a public park in Vauxhall, and Ranelagh as the site of the Chelsea flower show. This print offers 3 views on one sheet. A little marginal foxing which could be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 088
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
23 x 34.5cm


Chelsea from Battersea & The Thames, near Northfleet. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Two "London" based views of the Thames. At the time of this print Chelsea was still a village, and would not be joined to the growing metropolis for another 60 years or so. Northfleet was of importance for its dockyards, with a number of shipyards building large vessels for commercial companies such as the East India company. A narrow right-hand margin, but sufficient for mounting.
Ref: TOP 098
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
21.5 x 17cm


The Duke of Chando's Seat at Southgate. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Duke of Chandos residence was Minchenden House in Southgate, now a London Borough, but then a village. The house was built some little time after 1664 for Sir Thomas Wolstenholme, with alterations in 1738 by a later owner, John Nicholl. Nicholl's daughter married James Bridges who subsequently became the 3rd Duke of Chandos, and the house was owned by him at the time this print was taken.. It later fell into disrepair, and was sold and demolished in 1853. This print has been re-margined to the lower border where separated from another view on the same sheet. A liitle marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 089
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1764
£7
22.5 x 34.5cm


The Churches of St Pancras and Hornsey. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print shows the Old St. Pancras Church, which probably dates back to the 11th or 12th centuries, though most of its fabric is later. It ceased to be the parish church in 1822, when replaced by the New St. Pancras church on Euston Road. It was much restored and remodelled in the mid 19th century and continues as a place of worship today. St. Mary's Chruch in the village of Hornsey (now north London) dates from the 13th century. Althougn replaced as parish church by 2 later builds, it has survived both and continues in use today. This print offers views of both churches. A little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 103
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 34.5cm


Chiswick and Acton. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers views of 2 idyllic looking villages, now much busier London suburbs. Both villages were popular resorts in the 18th century, either as a day out to take the waters of Acton, or as permanent residential locations for professionals working in the city. The painter Hogarth had a house in Chiswick, and there were a number of small estates in Acton. This print offers 2 views on one sheet. A little marginal foxing and a worm hole would be mostly hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 087
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
35.5 x 21cm


Chiswick Gardens and the Serpentine River. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The first Chiswick house was a Jacobean house built in 1610. By the 1700's the property was owned by Lord Burlington who built a new Palladian Villa, and from about 1720 developed the gardens with William Kent and other architects. Both house and gardens were modelled on Roman exemplars. The Jacobean house was demolished in 1788. The Villa and gardens have been restored in recent years and survive today under a Trust. They are administered and opened to the public by English Heritage. The gardens are free of charge.
Ref: TOP 104
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£7
24 x 14.5cm


The Duke of Argyll's house at Whitton. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. In 1722 Archibald Campbell, later to become the 3rd Duke of Argyll, bought 40 acres on Hounslow Heath adjoining the hamlet of Whitton. From c1732-5 he built there a Palladian Villa to a design by Roger Morris who oversaw the build. The house was known as Whitton Place and was accompanied by substantial gardens.in the late 1840's the villa was demolished and the estate was sold, much of it being developed for housing in the 20th century.
Ref: TOP 151
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22.5 x 34cm


Hampton Court & Chertsey. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Hampton Court was constructed by Cardinal Wolsey in c1514, and passed to Henry VIII on the cardinal's fall from power in 1529. Under William and Mary the palace underwent massive extension in the Baroque style between 1688 and 1694. It is today managed by "Historic Royal Palaces" and open to the public. Chertsey is a very old town which grew up around Chertsey Abbey, founded in 666 AD.It became a Thames crossing of importance, but at the time of this print was possibly most famous for its cricket team who in 1778 heavily defeated a side representing "the rest of England". A narrow right-hand margin, but sufficient to mount, thus also hiding a few marginal spots.
Ref: TOP 154
 
S.& N. Buck    Buck's Views 1741
£295
80 x 30.5cm


Great Yarmounth. Between c 1720 and 1752 the brothers Samuel and Nathaniel Buck, produced over 300 engravings of topograhical antiquities, and 83 larger townscapes, the latter being particularly sought-after today. They were sold singly and in collected formats, being generally referred to as "Bucks Views". By 1780 the Bucks' copper plates had passed to Robert Sayer, one of the 18th century's most important publishers of maps and prints. Sayer republished the works, his edition differing from the original only in the addition of plate numbers. This view of Yarmouth is dated 1741, but has a plate number, thus dating it to the Sayer edition of the 1780's. Currently framed but could be de-framed if so desired.
Ref: TOP 078
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
24 x 17cm


Norwich Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Norwich Castle was founded by William the conqueror and built from 1066-75. The keep was rebuilt in stone from 1095-1110. The castle was used as a gaol from 1220 to 1887, when it was bought by the city corporation and opened as a museum in 1895. It still serves as the city's museum and art gallery today.
Ref: TOP 081
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
21.5 x 32cm


Northampton, Lichfield and Sherborne. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print shows panoramic views of 3 towns spread across the country, including the county town of Northants. A little light foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 152
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
23 x 35.5cm


Castle Ashby & Sponne Gate, Coventry & East Gate, Chester. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print offers 3 views. Castle Ashby is the ancestral home of the Compton family, built on lands given to the family in 1512. In 1574 Lord Compton demolished the old 13th century castle on the estate to build the present house, still standing today and occupied by the present Earl Compton. The gardens and grounds were, in part, designed by Lancelot "Capability" Brown, and are open to the public. Spon gate was one of the 12 gates in Coventry's defensive walls, constructed in the 14th century. It was demolished in the late 18th century. Chester's East gate, stands on the site of one of the 4 original gates into the Roman Legionary Fortress which occupied the site. The present gate was built in 1768, with its clock added in 1899. The print has narrow vertical margins and a nick to the upper-left border, but would mount-up successfully.
Ref: TOP 153
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
24.5 x 16.5cm


Daventry Priory. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Daventry's Cluniac Priory was origianlly founded in Preston Capes, with 4 monks, but shortly afterwards removed to Daventry. It was dissolved by Henry VIII in 1525, and the site given to what is now Christ Church College, Oxford.The Priory church became the town's Parish Church, until the late 18th century, when it was replaced by today's parish church.
Ref: TOP 080
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18 x 14.5cm


Monastery of the Black Friars, Newcastle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The order of Dominicans (The Blackfriars) founded their friary in Newcastle in 1239. It is sited to the NW of the city centre just within the city walls. Upon the dissolution of the monasteries, most of the buildings were demolished and the site passed to the city Corporation, who in 1552 leased out the remaining cloister buildings to the city's craft guilds. With the decline of the guilds the buildings fell into disrepair. They were restored by the Corporation between 1973 and 81, and are now leased out as craft workshops and a restaurant, though the Tanners Guild also still meet there. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 328
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 31.5cm


Newstead Abbey & Ruins in Nottingham Park. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Newstead Abbey was founded in 165 as an Augustinian Priory. After the dissolution of the monasteries the site passed to the Byron family in 1540, and was converted to a country house. By the time it was inherited by Lord Byron, the estate and house was much declined, and financial problems forced him to sell it in 1818. It is today owned by Nottingham Corporation who open it to the public. The "Ruins" described in the print, are part of Nottingham's system of over 500 caves, cut into the sandstone underlying the city. The earliest of the caves date back to to the late 13th century, and over the years they have served as cellars, a tannery, homes and air-raid shelters. Today some are open as a visitor attraction under the title "City of Caves". This print, engraved by Roberts, offers two views and is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 341
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1875/6
£10
23.5 x 16.5cm


In Sherwood Forest. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print, engraved by J.W. Whymper, shows a scene in Sherwood Forest, and appeared in Part 6 of the work. Today's forest occupies c423 hectares, and is a smaller and more fragmented area than that once taken up by the Royal Hunting Forest. It lies to the north of the city of Nottingham, and is most famous for its association with the Robin Hood legend. Part of the forest is now a Country Park, with public access, and part a National Nature Reserve.
Ref: TOP 205
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
19 x 12.5cm


Blenheim Palace, Woodstock. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The construction of Blenheim Palace began in 1705, on land gifted to John Churchil, Duke of Marlborough, by a grateful nation in recognition of his victory at the Battle of Blenheim during the War of the Spanish Succession. Parliament voted funding for the build to which the Duke also contributed. The architect was Sir John Vanburgh and the house was mostly completed by 1725, in the English Baroque style. Quarrels between the Royal House household and the Marlboroughs, and between the Dutchess and the Architect contributed to the delay, causing disruptions to the flow of funding. The house remains the seats of the Dukes of Marlborough today, and is open to the public. This print has been remargined to the top border, where separated from an adjoining view.
Ref: TOP 120
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Friar Bacon's Study, Oxford.. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Friar Bacon's Study (or Tower) was a 3 story building straddling the north end of South or Folly Bridge, carrying the main Oxford-Abingdon road across the Thames. It was lived and worked in by the 13th century alchemist Roger Bacon, but demolished in 1779 to allow for road widening. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 343
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Banbury Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Church illustrated is the old parish church, dedicated to St. Mary the Virgin. It dated from from 12th century, but its mid 15th century tower was too heavy and contributed to structural problems, exacerbated by civil war damage.. By the mid 18th century these problems were so great that it was decided to replace the building. In 1797 it was pulled down and replaced by the present parish church. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 344
 
Author not known.   The Beauties of England and Wales 1814
£12
15 x 10cm


Blandford House (Cornbury Park) near Charlbury. The Beauties of England and Wales was a topographical partwork issued in 18 volumes between 1810 and 1815. It was initially published by Vernor & Hood, and later by J. Harris. The estate of Cornbury is mentioned in the Domesday Book, but the earliest mention of the estate house dates from 1337.It was then a royal property, used as a hunting lodge, but by c 1615 was occupied by Henry Danvers, Earl of Danby, who built a new house there in the 1630's. The house was extended by a further new owner in 1661. By the late 1700's the house had passed into the ownership of the Duke of Marlborough, and had been re-christened Blandford House. It is today the private home of Lord and Lady Rotherwick, and has reverted to its original name of Cornbury House. This print was engraved by Woolnoth from a drawing by J.P. Neale, and is dated 1814.
Ref: TOP 159
 
Author not known.   The Beauties of England and Wales 1813
£12
15 x 10.5cm


Grey's Court, near Henley-on-Thames. The Beauties of England and Wales was a topographical partwork issued in 18 volumes between 1801 and 1815. It was initially published by Vernor & Hood, and later by J. Harris. The estate of Rotherfield Greys is mentioned in Domesday Book, when it belonged to the de Grey family. The present day Tudor mansion was built in the 1560's by Sir Francis Knollys, replacing an earlier meieval manor house, though the earliest surviving building on the site is the tower in the garden that dates from 1347 and was once part of a fortified castle. The house is today owned by the National Trust and open to the public. This print was engraved by Matthews from a drawing by the Rev'd. A. Howman, and is dated 1813.
Ref: TOP 158
 
Author not known.   The Beauties of England and Wales 1803
£10
15 x 10cm


Iffley, Oxford - St. Mary's Church. The Beauties of England and Wales was a topographical partwork issued in 18 volumes between 1810 and 1815. It was initially published by Vernor & Hood, and later by J. Harris. The Church of St. Mary was built around 1170-80 in the Norman style by the then Lord of the Manor, Robert de St. Remy. It is today Grade 1 listed, and has been little altered over the centuries, though the village of Iffley is now a suburb of Oxford. This print was engraved by B. Howlett from a drawing by J. Buckler, and is dated 1803.
Ref: TOP 155
 
Author not known.   The Beauties of England and Wales 1809
£12
17.5 x 13cm


Culham Court. The Beauties of England and Wales was a topographical partwork issued in 18 volumes between 1810 and 1815. It was initially published by Vernor& Hood, and later by J. Harris. Culham Court is a Queen Anne style, re-brick house on the banks of the Thames, just outside Henley. It was buily c 1770 by Richard Mitchell, a London lawyer who had married into money, and designed by Stiff Leadbetter. It remains today as a private residence. This print was engraved by W. Cooke after a drawing by S. Owen, and is dated 1809.
Ref: TOP 005
 
Author not known.   The Architectural Antiquities of Great Britain 1812
£10
13.5 x 20cm


Oxford - The Schools Tower. The Architectural Antiquities of Great Britain, by John Britton, was published in parts from 1805-14 by Longman and Co. This print was engraved by W. Woolnoth after a drawing by F. Mackenzie, and appeared in February 1812. It shows the Schools Tower of the Bodleian Library, better known as the Tower of the 5 Orders, as each story is built in a different one of the 5 classical orders of architecture. It was built between 1613 and 1619, as part of an extension for the library's fast growing stock of acquisitions. The tower is the main entrance to the library complex today.
Ref: TOP 166
 
Author not known.   The History and Antiquities of the Cathedral Church of Oxford 1820
£12
20.5 x 16cm


Oxford - Christ Church Cathedral Church. The History and Antiquities of the Cathedral Church of Oxford was one of a series of works on British cathedrals written by John Britton. It was published by Longman and Co. in 1821. The cathedral was originally the church of St. Frideswide's Priory, and has late Norman origins. The Priory was dissolved in 1522, and the site given to Cardinal Wolsey for a new Oxford college. After Wolsey's fall King Henry VIII took on the project which resulted in the foundation of Christ Church College in1546. The major part of the Priory church became the college's chapel, but the king also made it the cathedral church of the new diocese of Oxford. This print, engraved by S. Rawle after a drawing by T. Uwins, shows an interiior view of the church, and is dated December 1820. It is one of eleven prints in the work.
Ref: TOP 167
 
Author not known.   Publication not known. c1830
£0
15.5 x 9cm


Woodstock - Blenheim Palace. The construction of Blenheim Palace began in 1705, on land gifted to John Churchil, Duke of Marlborough, by a grateful nation in recognition of his victory at the Battle of Blenheim during the War of the Spanish Succession. Parliament voted funding for the build to which the Duke also contributed. The architect was Sir John Vanburgh and the house was mostly completed by 1725, in the English Baroque style. Quarrels between the Royal House household and the Marlboroughs, and between the Dutchess and the Architect contributed to the delay, causing disruptions to the flow of funding. The house remains the seats of the Dukes of Marlborough today, and is open to the public. This print, from an unknown source, shows a view of the palace from the gardens. It bears a faint signature, believed to be that of the engraver Samuel Rawle (1771-1860). An ex-library stamp to the lower right of the printed area could be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 161
 
Author not known.   Publication not known. c1820-30
£12
15.5 x 9cm


Woodstock - Blenheim Palace. The construction of Blenheim Palace began in 1705, on land gifted to John Churchil, Duke of Marlborough, by a grateful nation in recognition of his victory at the Battle of Blenheim during the War of the Spanish Succession. Parliament voted funding for the build to which the Duke also contributed. The architect was Sir John Vanburgh and the house was mostly completed by 1725, in the English Baroque style. Quarrels between the Royal House household and the Marlboroughs, and between the Dutchess and the Architect contributed to the delay, causing disruptions to the flow of funding. The house remains the seats of the Dukes of Marlborough today, and is open to the public. This print, from an unknown source, shows a view of the palace from the gardens. It bears a faint signature, believed to be that of the engraver Samuel Rawle (1771-1860). An ex-library stamp to the lower right of the printed area could be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 162
 
Author not known.   Publication not known. c1820-30
£12
15.5 x 9.5cm


Woodstock - Blenheim Palace. The construction of Blenheim Palace began in 1705, on land gifted to John Churchil, Duke of Marlborough, by a grateful nation in recognition of his victory at the Battle of Blenheim during the War of the Spanish Succession. Parliament voted funding for the build to which the Duke also contributed. The architect was Sir John Vanburgh and the house was mostly completed by 1725, in the English Baroque style. Quarrels between the Royal House household and the Marlboroughs, and between the Dutchess and the Architect contributed to the delay, causing disruptions to the flow of funding. The house remains the seats of the Dukes of Marlborough today, and is open to the public. This print, from an unknown source, shows a view of the palace from the gardens. It bears a faint signature, believed to be that of the engraver Samuel Rawle (1771-1860). An ex-library stamp to the lower right of the printed area could be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 163
 
Author not known.   Publication not known. c1820-30
£12
15.5 x 9.5cm


Woodstock - Blenheim Palace. The construction of Blenheim Palace began in 1705, on land gifted to John Churchil, Duke of Marlborough, by a grateful nation in recognition of his victory at the Battle of Blenheim during the War of the Spanish Succession. Parliament voted funding for the build to which the Duke also contributed. The architect was Sir John Vanburgh and the house was mostly completed by 1725, in the English Baroque style. Quarrels between the Royal House household and the Marlboroughs, and between the Dutchess and the Architect contributed to the delay, causing disruptions to the flow of funding. The house remains the seats of the Dukes of Marlborough today, and is open to the public. This print, from an unknown source, shows a view of the palace from the gardens. It bears a faint signature, believed to be that of the engraver Samuel Rawle (1771-1860). An ex-library stamp to the lower right of the printed area could be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 164
 
F. Mackenzie J. Le Keux    Memorials of Oxford 1837
£15
10.5 x 13.5cm


Oxford - Merton College Chapel from the Quadrangle. Memorials of Oxford was first published in 1837, though there were several later editions. It was a 3 volume work, with text written by James Ingram, and numerous steel engravings by John Le Keux after drawings by Frederick Mackenzie. Merton College was founded in the 1260's, and in 1266 was gifted the Parish Church of St. John to serve as its chapel. The church was in por repiar and had to be replaced by a new building on the same site around 1290. Extensions were added in the 14th and 15th centuries, and the church continued to act both as the college chapel and the parish church until 1891. Its huge east window is an important example of the later development of the Early English Style.
Ref: TOP 180
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1887/8
£10
14.5 x 21cm


Oxford - Trinty College, the Lime Walk. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print, engraved by W.H.J. Boot, shows the Lime Walk in the grounds of Trinity College.
Ref: TOP 222
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14.5cm


Grace Dieu Priory. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Grace Dieu Priory, near Thringstone in NW Leicestershire, was founded as an Augustinian Priory by Roesia de Verdon around 1235-41. After the dissolution of the monasteries it was converted to a private residence, before most of the buildings on the site were demolished in the late 17th century. The ruins of the Priory still survive in private ownership. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 351
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
18.5 x 14.5cm


Oakham Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Oakham Castle was built between 1180 and 1190 for the Lord of the Manor, Walchelin de Ferriers. Although designated a castle, a better description of the property is probably a fortified Manor House, of which today only the great hall survives - an excellent example of its type. The hall is famouse for its collection of decorative horseshoes presented by visiting royalty and other dignitaries. The site is today owned by Rutland County Council, with free public access. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work.
Ref: TOP 352
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
19.5 x 16.5cm


The City of Bath. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Bath was a well known spa town in Roman times, and the original Roman baths still survive. It regained its reputation as a Spa resort in the late 17th century, and was further developed as such by the Georgians, with many of the city's iconic building being constructed in the 18th century, giving Bath an architectural integrity which justifies its status as a World Heritage Site. This print has been remargined to the lower border, where separated from an adjoining view on the same page. A little marginal foxing, which would be mostly hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 111
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
19 x 15cm


Chapel of St. Joseph of Arimithea, Glastonbury Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The Chapel of St. Joseph is part of the surviving ruins of Glastonbury Abbey. According to one tradition, the Abbey was founded in the 1st century AD by Joseph of Arimethea, but in actuality its first foundation dates from the 7th century AD. The old monastery was mostly destroyed by fire in 1184, but reconstruction began immediately afterwards, and the Abbey grew into one of richest in the country. After the dissolution of the monasteries, it passed into private ownership, and the site was robbed of much of its stone. The surviving ruins are today owned by Glastonbury Abbey Trust, and open to the public. This print, engraved by Noble, is supplied with the original, accompanying text from the work. A few spots to the margins.
Ref: TOP 358
 
B. Clarke    The British Gazetteer 1852
£10
19 x 12cm


Bristol - The Terminus of the Great Western Railway. The British Gazetteer was authored by B. Clarke and published by H.G. Collins in 1852. Apart from topographical text listings, it included a set of county maps (originally by Rowe), and a small series of railway prints after drawings by J.F. Burrell. This print was engraved by A. Ashley after a drawing by J.F. Burrell, and shows the frontage of Temple Meads Station. The station was designed and built by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, initially for the Great Western Railway, but was soon being used by several additional railway companies, requiring its expansion and provision for "through" services in the 1870's. It was further expanded in the 1930's. Brunel's original station was taken out of service in 1965, but is Grade 1 Listed and still used for other purposes. The print has some waterstaining.
Ref: TOP 1495
 
Author not known.   Pictureque Europe c1876/7
£12
15 x 22cm


The George, Glastonbury. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print, engraved by Whymper after P. Skelton, shows The George, a classical old coaching inn on Glastonbury's High Street, and appeared in part 14 of the work. The Inn, which dates back to the 1400's, is today named the George and Pilgrim Hotel.
Ref: TOP 208
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22 x 37.5cm


Two views of Shugborough House . The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Shugborough Estate was originally owned by the Bishops of Lichfield, but passed into private hands after the dissolution of the monasteries. In 1624 it was acquired by William Anson, whose grandson, in 1693, demolished the old manor house and replaced it with a new 3 story house which forms the core of today's mansion. Shugborough Hall was extended with the addition of pavillions in the 1740's. The house remained in the Anson family (later Earls of Lichfield) until 1960, when it was passed to the National Trust who open it to the public. This print offers 2 views on 1 page. Some foxing to the (narrow) margins which could be mostly hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 146
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
21.5 x 32cm


Lichfield, Northampton & Sherborne. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print shows panoramic views of 3 towns spread across the country, including the Staffordshire cathedral city of Lichfield. A little light foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 152
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
cm


Alderton Church. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Alderton is a small village about 6 miles noth of Felixstowe. The partially ruined church of St. Andrew is interesting and picuresque. The oldest parts of the church date from the 14th century and the tower was built in the 15th century, but apparently not very well. It progressively collapsed to its current height and state of ruination from the 17th century up to 1821. With no tower, the church bell is today mounted on a wooden framework in the churchyard. The rest of the church was restored by the Victorians. This print, engraved by Noble, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 365
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
17.5 x 31cm


Lambeth Palace & Westminster Abbey and St. Margaret's Church. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Lambeth Palace sits on the south bank of the Thames, and is the London residence of the Archbishop of London. The complex has been rebuilt and extended over the centuries, with the earliest surviving part being Lollards Tower, dating from 1435-40. The first Westminster Abbey was founded by Edward the Confessor, but the present building was begun in 1245, with work continuing until 1517. The two western towers were addded by Hawksmoor between 1722 and 1745. The Abbey has been used for all royal coronations since 1066. This print, engraved by Taylor, offers two views on one sheet. Some marginal foxing and a nick to the lower margin would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 102
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
23.5 x 35cm


Dulwich College, and Camberwell from the Grove. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Dulwich College is an independent, public school, founded in1619 by the Elizabethan actor, Edward Allen. It originally offered schooling for "twelve poor scholars", today risen to 1,500 rather less poor ones. At the time of this print Camberwell was still a rural village, but development had already begun along the street known as The Grove, and today the area's elegant Georgian houses have "Conservation Area" status. The print has a narrow right hand margin, but sufficient to mount.
Ref: TOP 095
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£9
23.5 x 35cm


Addington Place, Croydon, & The Royal Circus, St. George's Fields. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Addington Place is a Palladian mansion built in the early 1770's by the Trecothic family. From 1807-1930 it was owned by the Church and used as a London residence by the Archbishops of Canterbury when its name changed from "Place" to "Palace". It is today again in private hands and run as a country club, conference and banqueting centre, and wedding venue. The Royal Circus opened on Blackfriars Road in 1782 and put on equine and canine dramas. It burnt down in 1799 and again in 1805, after which it was rebuilt as the Surrey Theatre. It was finally demolished in 1934. The Obelisk shown in the print was erected in 1771 in honour of Brass Crosby, Mayor of London. It still stands today, but the open space of St. George's Fields succumbed to development from 1780. The print has a little light marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 094
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
20.5 x 34cm


The seat of Admiral Keppel, Bagshot & the seat of David Garrick, Hampton. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The Crown estate of Bagshot Park, was once a royal hunting park, and a house, known as Bagshot Park Lodge, was built there in1631-33 for the use of King Charles I. It was remodelled in 1766-72, apparently for occupation by George Keppel, Earl of Albermarle, but upon his death in 1772, it would appear to have been offered to his brother Augustus, Vice Admiral Keppel. This house was demolished in 1878, but the Park remains the home of royalty today. David Garrick was a prominent Georgian actor and theatrical manager. He moved to what was then called Hampton House in1754, first renting then purchasing and improving the property. The Adam bothers remodelled the house and Capability Brown assisted in the design of the gardens, which are notable for the Temple of Shakespeare, which still stands on the banks of the Thames, and is visible in this view. The house, today called Garrick's Villa, was converted into appartments in 1923. This print offers 2 views on one sheet. A little foxing to the margins which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 125
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
20.5 x 31.5cm


Richmond from the Thames & Richmond, Yorks.. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers views of the two Richmonds - Richmond-on-Thames In Surrey (now ther London Borough of Ricmond), and Richmond in North Yorkshire, whose castle overlooks the River Swale. A little light foxing to the margins, which would be mostly hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 122
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
23 x 33.5cm


The Thames from Richmond Hill & Greewich Park. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers 2 classic London Views - the River Thames from Richmond Hill, and the Thames and Greewich Naval Hospital from the top end of Greewich park.
Ref: TOP 100
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller c1787-9
£9
22 x 34.5cm


Wandsworth & the Thames, Clapham from the Common. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers two views of what were then still rural retreats for those wishing to escape the hubbub of the busy City of London - a far cry from today's London Boroughs. Some foxing the the right-hand margin and decorative border, but could be hidden by mounting within the border.
Ref: TOP 093
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
23 x 34.5cm


Mortlake and Hammersmith from the Thames. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print would be the ideal present for fans of the Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race, offering views of the Middlesex bank at Hammersmith and the Surrey bank near the finish at Mortlake. A narrow right-hand margin with a light-brown mark, but sufficient to mount.
Ref: TOP 101
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22 x 34cm


The Bishop of London's seat at Fulham, & Lord Stormont's House, Wandsworth. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Fulham Palace was the residence of the Bishops of London from the early 8th century. In 1973 the Bishop's seat was relocated and the old palace became a museum, with its grounds now used as a botanic garden and allotments. The Lord Stormont here referred to was the 7th Viscount Stormont, David Murray. The family seat was at scone, but Murry needed a residence near London to pursue his political career, and chose this viilla on Wandsworth Hill, probably leased from Lady Rivers. He later became the Earl of Mansfield in 1793, inheriting Kenwood House. Two prints on one sheet. A little marginal foxing which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 092
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
21.5 x 36cm


Guildford & Birmingham. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Guildford's roots go back to Saxon times when it was an important centre housing a mint. A Norman castle was added around 1090, and an impressive 14th century guildhall is still extant. The town prospered, particularly from 1693 when the Wey Navigation opened, making Guildford the hub of an important waterway network. In the 20th century it also became a Bishop's seat and a University town, and is today the county town of Surrey. This print offers views of Guildford and Birmingham, but the views could be separated for separate framing. A little foxing to the top border and the margins.
Ref: TOP 086
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22.5 x 34cm


Hampton Court & Chertsey. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Hampton Court was constructed by Cardinal Wolsey in c1514, and passed to Henry VIII on the cardinal's fall from power in 1529. Under William and Mary the palace underwent massive extension in the Baroque style between 1688 and 1694. It is today managed by "Historic Royal Palaces" and open to the public. Chertsey is a very old town which grew up around Chertsey Abbey, founded in 666 AD.It became a Thames crossing of importance, but at the time of this print was possibly most famous for its cricket team who in 1778 heavily defeated a side representing "the rest of England". A narrow right-hand margin, but sufficient to mount, thus also hiding a few marginal spots.
Ref: TOP 154
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£12
18 x 32.5cm


Guildford Castle & The Castle's Ancient Crypt. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Guildford Castle is of Norman foundation, probably dating from shortly after 1086, and added to over the years.It was a royal residence until 1611 when it passed into private hands. It has been owned by Guildford Corporation since 1885. The grounds are today public gardens, the gatehouse a museum, and the keep has been restored as a visitor centre. This print, engraved by Hawkins, offers 2 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 370
 
B. Clarke    The British Gazetteer 1852
£15
21.5 x 13.5cm


Box Hill and the Dorking Railway. The British Gazetteer was authored by B. Clarke and published by H.G. Collins in 1852. Apart from topographical text listings, it included a set of county maps (originally by Rowe), and a small series of railway prints after drawings by J.F. Burrell. This print was engraved by A. Ashley and shows the well-known beauty spot of Box Hill, with the railway viaduct in the distance.
Ref: TOP 1497
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
22 x 23.5cm


Brighton from the sea & Chichester. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Brighton (or Brighthelmstone as it was once called), was a small settlement at the time of Domesday Book, and remained a fishing village until its development in the 18th and 19th centuries into a fashionable seaside resort.This was helped by its patronage by the Prince Regent, the future George IV, who first visited in 1783, and later built his Royal Pavillion there in the 1820's. Chichester was an important Roman town, which became a Bishop's seat in 1075, and its cathedral - shown in this print - dates from that time. This print has a narrow righ-hand margin, but sufficient for mounting.
Ref: TOP 123
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
21.5 x 34.5cm


Arundel Castle & Lord George Lenox's seat at West Stoke. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. The construction of Arundel Castle was begun in 1067 by Roger de Montgomery. It guards the Arun gap through the South Downs, and has been owned by the Howard family, Dukes of Norfolk, since 1557. In the 18th and 19th centuries it was remodelled as a comfortable stately home, and is today open to the public. Lord George Lennox made his reputation as a soldier, but was also an MP, representing the constituencies of Chichester, and later Sussex betwenn 1761 and 1790. His house at West Stoke, 4 miles from Chichester, still survives as a private residence.The print has a few spots to the margins, which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 124
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1875
£10
22.5 x 16.5cm


Bodiam Castle. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print, engraved by J.W. Whymper, shows Bodiam Castle, and appeared in Part 4 of the work. Between 1385 and 1389 Richard II gave license" to crennelate" to Edward Dalngrigge, Lord of the Manor of Bodiam.Rather than fortify his existing manor house, he built Bodiam Castle on a new site. The property passed through the hands of several later owners, by marriage or by sale, and after partilal sleighting in the civil war it decayed, though still occupied, before two bouts of restoration in the mid 1800's. In 1925 it passed to the ownership of the National Trust who maintain it today, with public access.
Ref: TOP 198
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1875
£10
15.5 x 23.5cm


Hurstmonceaux Castle. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print has an unidentifiable author's cypher, and appeared in Part 5 of Picturesque Europe, published c1875.The construction of Hutstmonceaux Castle was begun in 1441 by Sir Roger Fiennes, on the site of an earlier manor house. By the mid 18th centry it had decayed and was partially dismantled in1777, leaving the exterior walls standing as a picturesque shell (as shown here). In the 20th centry it was, however, restored for use as a private house, and subsequently became the home of the Royal Greenwich Observatory from 1957-88. It is today owned by Queen's University, Canada, and run as The Bader International Study Centre.
Ref: TOP 199
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1875
£10
22.5 x 16.5cm


Off Beachy Head, Sussex . Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This vivid wood-cut print, engraved by J.W. Whymper after a drawing by T.L. Rowbotham, shows small boats salvaging wreckage after a storm, with Beachy Head and Eastbourne as a backdrop.
Ref: TOP 200
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
23 x 35.5cm


Sponne Gate, Coventry & East Gate, Chester & Castle Ashby. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Castle Ashby is the ancestral home of the Compton family, built on lands given to the family in 1512. In 1574 Lord Compton demolished the old 13th century castle on the estate to build the present house, still standing today and occupied by the present Earl Compton. The gardens and grounds were, in part, designed by Lancelot "Capability" Brown, and are open to the public. Spon gate was one of the 12 gates in Coventry's defensive walls, constructed in the 14th century. It was demolished in the late 18th century. Chester's East gate, stands on the site of one of the 4 original gates into the Roman Legionary Fortress which occupied the site. The present gate was built in 1768, with its clock added in 1899. The print has narrow vertical margins and a nick to the upper-left border, but would mount-up successfully.
Ref: TOP 153
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
21.5 x 16.5cm


Greyfriars Gate and Church, Coventry. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Greyfriars Church was the monastic church of a Franciscan house, first recorded in 1234. Its tower and spire alone survived the dissolution of the monasteries, being incorporated into a new church built in the 1820's. This was largely destroyed by World War II bombing, but again the tower survived, Nearby once stood Greyfriars gate, one of the 12 gates built in the second half of the 14th century as part of the city's defences. Greyfriars gate was erected in1384 on the Warwick road It was demolished in 1781. The print is remargined to the top border where separated from an adjoining view.
Ref: TOP 118
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
24.5 x 16cm


Maxstoke Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Maxstoke Castle, about 3 miles from Coleshill, was built by Sir William de Clinton shortly after 1345. Since the 17th century it has been the family home of the Fetherstone-Dikes family, which it remains today. It is open to the general public for a short period each year (usually June), and for pre-booked tours.
Ref: TOP 105
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
21.5 x 36cm


Birmingham (and Guildford). The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers views of both Bormingham and Guildford, but these could be separated for individual mounting if so required. At the time the print was taken, Birmingham was at the forefront of the industrial revolution, having grown from a midlle-sized market town to a major manufacturing centre over the course of the 18th century. It is today Great Britain's second largest city.
Ref: TOP 086
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
23.5 x 16.5cm


Appleby Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Appleby Castle was founded by Ranulph de Meschines in c1170. From 1269 until 1653 it was the home of the powerful Clifford family, before its conversion to a more comforatble mansion by its next owner the Earl of Thanet. Since then a new wing has been added and further updatings have occurred. Itis today a private residence, but pre-booked, private tours can be arranged.
Ref: TOP 140
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
17.5 x 30.5cm


Derwentwater, Broad Water and Windermere. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This anonymous print offers views of 3 Cumbrian lakes. At the time it was taken the English Lake District was just beginning to find a wider audience for its picuresque beauty. Broad Water was the old name applied to two of the lakes - Bassenthwaite and Brothers Water. As this view of Broadwater is designated as in Westmorland it relates to the latter of the two.
Ref: TOP 116
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
10 x 19cm


Kendal Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Kendal Castle was built in the late 12th century by the Lancaster family, Baron's of Kendal. Its last enhabitant was probably William Parr, Baron of Kendal, and grandfather to Catherine Parr, who married King Henry VIII in 1543. By that time the Castle had been abandoned to decay. The site is today owned by the South Lakeland District Council who allow free access to the scant ruins. This print, engraved by Lowry, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 391
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
16 x 15cm


Salisbury. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Modern Salisbury originated from the removal of the bishop's seat from nearby Old Sarum, to a new site to the south. The new cathedral, built in the Earley English Gothic style, was begun in 1220 and mostly complete by 1280. The town grew up around it, receiving its royal charter and city status in 1227. It is notable for having the tallest spire of any British cathedral, and by the 14th century had grown to be the largest settlement in Wiltshire. The print has some worm holes and foxing to the margins, which could be hidden by judicious mounting as per our image.
Ref: TOP 143
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18.5 x 14cm


Malmesbury Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Malmesbury Abbey was founded as a Benedictine house in the late 7th centry AD, and the town of Malmesbury grew up around it. The current Abbey was constructed in the 12th century, and mostly complete by 1180. Two major collapses in the 16th century - to the main tower and the west tower - caused great damage to other parts of the fabric, resulting in the shortening of the church. After the dissolution of the monasteries the surviving part became the parish church, and continues to fulfil that role today. This print, engraved by Peltro is supplied with the original, accompanying text. A slight crease.
Ref: TOP 395
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£9
18.5 x 14cm


Stonehenge. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Stoehange is an important prehistoric monument, located c8 miles north of Salisbury. Its date is uncertain, but broadly sometime betwenn 3,000BC and 2,000BC. The site has many Neolithic and Bronze age burials but scholarly interpretations of its function vary. It is a Unesco World Heritage Site. This print was engraved by Peltro, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 396
 
Author not known.   The European Magazine 1805
£12
14 x 10cm


Salisbury from the London Road . The European Magazine was published from 1792 until 1826, eventually building into 89 volumes. It offered a range of content and competed with the Gentleman's Magazine and others. This engraving of Salisbury was engraved by S.Rawle after I. Nixon, and was issued in 1805. Modern Salisbury originated from the removal of the bishop's seat from nearby Old Sarum, to a new site to the south. The new cathedral, built in the Earley English Gothic style, was begun in 1220 and mostly complete by 1280. The town grew up around it, receiving its royal charter and city status in 1227. It is notable for having the tallest spire of any British cathedral, and by the 14th century had grown to be the largest settlement in Wiltshire.
Ref: TOP 188
 
Author not known.   Great Britain Illustrated 1830
£15
14.5 x 9cm


Calne, from the Canal. Great Britain Illustrated was published in 1830 by Charles Tilt. It featured 118 steel engravings after drawings by the prominent landscape artist William Westall. The supporting text was written by Thomas Moule. This print of the canal at Calne was engraved by E. Francis. The market town of Calne has Anglo Saxon origins, and prospered due to its situation on the busy London-Bristol road. In the 18th century it also enjoyed a stong position in wool, and cloth weaving. Its economic prospects were further enhanced when it was linked to the canal network in 1810, linking it to London and other markets. This print underlines the importance of that link, which only closed in 1914.
Ref: TOP 398
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 14.5cm


Evesham Abbey. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Evesham Abbey was founded by St. Egwin between 700 and 710 AD as a Benedictine house, and by the late middle ages was one of the richest in England. After the dissolution of the monasteries it was gradually robbed of its stone by the local townspeople, and today the bell tower is the only substantial remain, this being of 16th century date. This print, engraved by Coote, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 400
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
18 x 14.5cm


Edgar's Tower, Worcester. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Worcester once had a castle, first built in the early Norman period, and strengthened over time. Edgar's Gate (here called Edgar's Tower) was the main entrance into the castle, and dates from the 14th century. No other part of the castle survives, and the gate is now the entrance into the cathedral precinct, its rooms being used by The King's School, Worcester. This print, engraved by M. Coote, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 401
 
S.& N. Buck    Bucks' Views 1745
£450
78.5 x 30.5cm


The East Prospect of Sheffield in the County of York. Between c 1720 and 1752 the brothers Samuel and Nathaniel Buck, produced over 300 engravings of topograhical antiquities, and 83 larger townscapes. These prints, collectively known as Bucks' Views, are much admired and collected today, and especially the larger townscapes. This view of Sheffield from the eastern side is dated 1745. Sheffield's origins go back to the iron age forts of the Brigantes, the local tribe who dominated several of the northern counties until the arrival of the Romans. After the Norman conquest Sheffield grew from being a small market town on the back of specialist industires. By the 14th century it was already known for producing knives, and by the 1660's was second only to London in the manufacture of cutlery. At the time this print was taken the town was poised for further growth on the back of its latest technolgical innovations - steel making, and silver plating by the method to be known as "Sheffiled Plate". The print, however, still suggests rural tranquillity.
Ref: TOP 075
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
19.5 x 14cm


Scarborough. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Scarborough is rumoured to have been founded by a Viking raider, Thorgils Skarthi, no early evidence survives to support this legend. The town does, though, boast a Norman Castle dating from the 11th century, and by 1155 it was of sufficient importance to receive a charter from King Henry II, allowing it to hold markets. The popular song "Are you going to Scarborough Fair" has passed in musical history. In 1626 a mineral spring was discovered there, which gave rise to the construction and growth of Scarborough Spa, and visitors flocked to take the waters and partake in sea bathing. The town remains an important seaside resort today.
Ref: TOP 107
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
31.5 x 20cm


High Force on the River Tees. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Although un-named as such, this print shows the waterfall of High Force on the upper reaches of the River Tees, which forms the border between the North Riding of Yorkshire and Durham. Although impressive, its fall of 71 feet does not place it amongst Britain's highest waterfalls.
Ref: TOP 126
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
18.5 x 16.5cm


Wentworth House. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. in 1725 Thomas Watson-Wentworth, Ist Marquess of Rockingham began a new house on his estate to replace the old Jacobean brick house he had inherited. The new house was built in the English Baroque style, but before its completion, a new even larger east wing was begun, this time in the Palladian style. The finished result was two back to back mansions, joined as one huge house. The second Marquess (twice later Prime Minister of Whig goverments) continued to extend the house when he inherited in 1750, but after his death the house passed to the Fitzwilliam family. The family fell on hard times in the 20th century, when the estate and grounds were desecrated by coal mining, and death duties resulted in the sale of much of the house's contents. The family sold the house in 1989, since when it has had 2 private owners, but its future remains uncertain and it was recently Nov. 2014) reported to be again on the market.
Ref: TOP 127
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£12
20.5 x 31.5cm


Richmond, Yorks. & Richmond from the Thames. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. This print offers views of the two Richmonds, which could be separated if so desired. The town of Richmond in North Yorkshire grew up around the Norman castle at a strategic position guarding the head of Swaledale. In medieval times it prospered from the wool industry, and then in the late 18th and early 19th centuries had a further economic boom from lead mining in the Swale and Arkengarthdale valleys. Most of the town's impressive Georgian buildings date from this period, including the Theatre Royal, founded in 1788, and today one of the country's oldest extant theatres. The print has a little foxing to the margins, which would be mostly hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 122
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 14cm


Richmond . The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Richmond Castle was founded Alan Rufus first Lord of Richmond, as part of the Norman pacification of northern England. It was completed in 1086, and stands at the head of Swaledale overlooking the River Swale. It was strengthened by Henry II, including the building of the stone keep, but thereafter decayed and was partially in ruins by 1538. In the early 19th century it was restored and used as the HQ of the North Yorkshire Militia, for whom a new barracks block was built in the courtyard. Today it is owned by English Heritage and opened to the public. This print, engraved by Hawkins, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 413
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 32.5cm


Bowes & Coningsburgh Castles. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. The first Bowes Castle was built by Alan de Bretagne, Count of Brittanyaround 1386 within an old Roman fort. Henry II later rebuilt it in stone from 1171-4. Damaged in Scottish raods and by local insurgency, the castle was ruinous by 1340. Today it is owned by English Heritage who open it to the public. Coningsburgh or Conisburough Castle was built on the River Don shortly after the Norman conquest by William de Warenne, Earl of Srrey. It was rebuilt in stone in the late 12th century, but later suffered from subsidence and fell into decay. By the late 19th century it was a picturesque tourist attraction. A consortium undertook restoration in the 1990's and today it is maintained and opened to the public by English Heritage. This print, engraved by Eastgate, offers 2 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text pages.
Ref: TOP 408
 
P. Russell    England Displayed 1769/70
£8
24 x 14cm


Carisbrook Castle, Isle of Wight. England Displayed was a topograhical partwork, first published in April 1769, and comprising 80 weekly part. It was designed to grow into 2 volumes, with each receiving a title page as completed. When all 80 parts had been issued the series could also be purchased as a complete work. The publishers were P. Russell, O. Price and J. Coote, and it comprised 81 topographical prints and 54 maps, plus some 700 pages of text. Carisbrooke Castle existed by 1100 when it was in the possession of Richard de Redvers, but forts existed on the site in both Roman and Saxon times. The castle was purchased by King Edward I in 1293, since when it has been a crown property controlled by a Warden. King Charles 1 was imprisoned there in 1648/9 prior to his trial and execution, and in more recent times it was home to Queen Victoria's daughter, Princess Beatrice from 1896-1944. It is today maintained by English Heritage who open it to the public. This print bears no signatures of author or engraver.
Ref: TOP 073
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
17 x 30.5cm


West Cowes Castle & Carisbrooke Castle. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. West Cowes Castle is one of 2 forts built by Henry VIII in 1539 to guard the mouth of the River Medina. In 1716 the fort was remodelled for residential use, and further adapted in 1856-8 as the Club House for the Royal Yacht Squadron, which it remains today. Carisbrooke Castle existed by 1100 when it was in the possession of Richard de Redvers, but forts existed on the site in both Roman and Saxon times. The castle was purchased by King Edward I in 1293, since when it has been a crown property controlled by a Warden. King Charles 1 was imprisoned there in 1648/9 prior to his trial and execution, and in more recent times it was home to Queen Victoria's daughter, Princess Beatrice from 1896-1944. It is today maintained by English Heritage who open it to the public. This print offers 2 views on 1 sheet, which could be separated for individual mounting if desired. A little marginal foxing would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 147
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 32.5cm


Carisbrooke Castle, Isle of Wight. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Carisbrooke Castle existed by 1100 when it was in the possession of Richard de Redvers, but forts existed on the site in both Roman and Saxon times. The castle was purchased by King Edward I in 1293, since when it has been a crown property controlled by a Warden. King Charles 1 was imprisoned there in 1648/9 prior to his trial and execution, and in more recent times it was home to Queen Victoria's daughter, Princess Beatrice from 1896-1944. It is today maintained by English Heritage who open it to the public. This print, engraved by Neigel, offers 2 views on 1 sheet, and is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 414
 
Author not known.   The "Garden Isle" Series of Views c1880
£10
23 x 21.5cm


Carisbrooke Castle, Isle of Wight. This is not an engraving or wood cut, but an original photographic print. The photo is mounted on card which carries the statement that it was part of "The Garden Isle" series of views and sold by J. Briddon, Ventnor. James Briddon was a self-made Victorian entrepreneur, born in 1827, who came to the Isle of Wight around 1851. He started off in Ryde where he sold and published books and prints, and founded the Isle of Wight Mercury newspaper. Around 1863 he purchased the Esplanade Bazaar in Ventnor from where he carried on his previous activities, but also diversified into the new and up-and-coming field of photography, creating various photographic souvenirs for the tourist trade. He died in 1894. This photograph shows the entrance gateway to Carisbrooke Castle, and is tentatively dated to c 1880.
Ref: TOP 074
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
22 x 16.5cm


Jersey - St. Hilary. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. St. Hilary is one of the 12 parishes of Jersey, and covers the majority of St. Helier, the islands largest town, which was once known by the parish name. The origins of the two alternative spellings are somewhat confused. One suggestion is that St. Helier was a martyred hermit living on the island in the first millenium, and his name was corrupted to "St. Hilary". An alternative version suggests a linkage with St. Hilary, Bishop of Poitiers, with the parish church being dedicated in his honour. The corruption of the names would then be in the reverse order. This print shows a view of the town from the sea, and was probably taken from Elizabeth Castle, which lies on an offshore islet in the bay. A little marginal foxing, which could be hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 106
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
17.5 x 15cm


Peele Castle, Isle of Man. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Peel Castle stands on St. Patrick's Isle which has a causeway connection to the town of Peel.The first structure on the island was the Celtic monastery of St. Patrick, built sometime in the 10th century. Magnus Barefoot, King of Mann is believed to have built the first castle in the 11th century, incorporating part of the monastery, notably the surviving round tower. Most of the other extant castle remains date from the early 14th century. Within the castle precinct are the ruins of the cathedral of St. German, built in stages between the 12th and 14th centuries, but later abandoned to decay from the 18th century. The site is today maintained by Manx National Heritage and open to the public. This print has a little light foxing to the margins, which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 148
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£8
19 x 14cm


Castle Rushin (Rushen), Castletown, Isle of Man. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Castle Rushin stands in a central position in Castletown, the historic capital of the Isle of Man. The first timber castle on the site was probably constructed in the 9th centry AD, with later rebuilding in stone and additions from the 13th to the 16th centuries. It was originally a possession of the Kings of Mann, and subsequently fought over by the Scots and English, changing hands several times. After 1660 its densive importance reduced, and it fell into decay, though still used as a prison, until it was restored in the late 19th century. It has been owned by Manx National Heritage since 1988, and is open as a heritage centre and museum. This print, engraved by Peltro, is supplied with the original, accompanying text. A few spots - mostly to the margins - which would be hidden by a mount.
Ref: TOP 420
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£8
17 x 15.5cm


Anglesey - The Collegiate Church of Holyhead. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Holyhead's Collegiate Church was built between the 13th and 16th centuries. It was originally a monastic foundation, constructed within the site of an old Roman fort. As a "collegiate" church its worship was administered by a body of "secular" canons, and it served as the parish church of the community. In 1547 an Act of Parliament abolished collegiate foundations, but the church survived and continued as the local parish church dedicated to St. Cybi. This print was engraved by Roberts.
Ref: TOP 149
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 14.5cm


Brecknockshire - Trtior Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Trtior (or Tretower) Castle was first built around 1200 by the Picard family, originally in timber, but soon with the addition of a stone keep. The walls were later also rebuilt in stone. In the early 14th century a new fortified house (named Tretower Court) was built by the family outside the castle precincts. This offered much more comfortable and modern accommodation, and over time the castle fell into misuse and decay. In 1540 the properties passed to the Vaughan family until they sold them in 1783, after which Tretower Court also declined. It was saved by Government intervention in the 20th century, and is today maintained and opened to the the public by the Wesh Heritage Agency CADW. This print, engraved by Carey, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 422
 
A. Hogg H. Boswell    The Antiquities of England and Wales c1787-9
£10
18.5 x 14.5cm


Brecknockshire - Brecknock Castle. The Antiquities of England and Wales was the product of Alexander Hogg who was well known as a partwork publisher. Under the claimed authorship of Henry Boswell it was issued serially from c1787-9, and subsequently made available as a complete work. The format was typically 2 (though sometimes up to 6) prints to a page, with one or two accompanying pages of descriptive text on each pair of subjects. It also included the set of English county maps by Thomas Kitchin first used in the London Magazine from 1747-54. Brecon Castle was built in the late 11th century by Bernard de Neufmarche, brother of William the Conqueror. Its strategic position at the confluence of the Rivers Usk and Honddu, made it an iimportant military and administrative centre for the Lords of Brecon's control of the Welsh Marches.. The original castle was built in timber but soon strengthened and extended with new stoneworks during the 12th and 13th centuries. From the mid 16th century its defensive role declined, and it fell into disrepair and decay before its acquisition and restoration by the Morgan family, who gave it a new life as a hotel, which it remains today. This print, engraved by Carey, is supplied with the original, accompanying text.
Ref: TOP 423
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1878
£8
16 x 23.5cm


Caernarvonshire - Penrhyn Slate Quarries. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print shows the slate quarries at Penryn, near Bethesda. From c1770 Richard Pennant was responsible for the rapid development of the quarry, investing in infrasture such as a light railway to transport the slate to Port Penryhn for shipment by sea. By the time of this print Penryhn Quarry was the largest slate quarry in Europe, employing some 3,000 men. It remains in business today, and is still the largest in the UK, but requiring only 200 employees thanks to modern mechanisation and extraction techniques. This print appeared in Part 19 of Picturesque Europe in c1878.
Ref: TOP 226
 
B. Clarke    The British Gazetteer 1852
£12
20 x 12.5cm


Caernarvonshire - Conway - the new tubular bridge on the Chester and Holyhead Railway. The British Gazetteer was authored by B. Clarke and published by H.G. Collins in 1852. Apart from topographical text listings, it included a set of county maps (originally by Rowe), and a small series of railway prints, mostly after drawings by J.F. Burrell. This print was both drawn and engraved by A. Ashley. The Conway Railway Bridge was designed by William Fairbairn and built by Robert Stephenson, and was the world's first wrought-iron tubular bridge, and the only surviving example of its type still extant today. It carried the railway across the River Conway, and was opened in 1849.
Ref: TOP 1488
 
B. Clarke    The British Gazetteer 1852
£10
19.5 x 12cm


Caernarvonshire - The Menai Straights Bridge on the Chester and Holyhead Railway. The British Gazetteer was authored by B. Clarke and published by H.G. Collins in 1852. Apart from topographical text listings, it included a set of county maps (originally by Rowe), and a small series of railway prints after drawings by J.F. Burrell. This print was engraved by A. Ashley, and shows Robert Stephenson's new wrought-iron tubular railway bridge across the Menai Strait. This type of construction was very new and many doubted that it would succeed with such long spans, but rigourous testing by William Fairbairn suggested it could and the design was approved. The bridge opened in 1850 after 4 years of construction work. It survived until 1970 when it was damaged by fire, and had to be rebuilt - this time to a different design. Some waterstaining to the print.
Ref: TOP 1490
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1878
£8
14.5 x 23cm


Caernarvonshire - Pandy Mill and Fall, near Betwys-Y-Coed. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print, after a drawing by T.C.L. Rowbotham, shows Pandy Falls on the River Machno in the Snowdonia National Park, with Pandy Mill Cottage, part of the adjacent Penmachno Wollen Mill. The print appeared in Part 18 of Picturesque Europe, published c1878.
Ref: TOP 196
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1878
£8
16 x 24cm


Caernarvonshire - Pont Aberglaslyn. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This anonymous wood-cut print shows the bridge over the River Glaslyn in the Glaslyn Gorge in Snowdonia. The bridge was, by legend, built by the Devil, on the condition that he would have the soul of the first being to pass over it. He was tricked by the magician Robin Ddu, who ensured the first to cross was a dog rather than a human. The print appeared in Part 19 of Picturesque Europe, published c 1878.
Ref: TOP 224
 
A. Hogg    Picturesque Europe c1878
£10
22.5 x 16.5cm


Merionethshire - Harlech Castle,. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print, engraved by J.W. Whymper from a drawing by W.L. Leitch shows Harlech Castle, which was built by Edward I between 1282 and 1289 on the Merioneth coast. It was captured and held for 5 years by the Welsh during the revolt of Owain Gyndwr, before reverting to English control in 1409. It played a role in the civil war after which it was slighted in 1649, subsequently decaying into a picturesque ruin much loved by artists and writers of the Romantic age. Its impressive ruins are today in the care of the Welsh Heritage body, CADW, and open to the public.
Ref: TOP 225
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£10
34.5 x 22.5cm


Pembrokeshire - The Castle and Bridge of Haverford West. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. According to most sources the Castle at Haverforwest was founded by Gilbert de Clare in 1120. In 1213 it passed to William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke (who did much to strengthen the fortifications, then in 1248 to the de Bohun family, who in turn sold it in 1288 to Queen Eleanor of Castille, wife of King Edward I. The Queen undertook major reconstruction, but her work was undone when the castle was slighted and abandoned after the civil war. It was, however, re-modelled as a prison from 1779 to 1878, and subsequently as a police station, and council offices. Today it is administered and opened to the public by the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority. The bridge in the view was built in 1726 to replace the old ford across the River Cleddau. The print has some light discolouration and a couple of wormholes to the lower margin, which would be mostly hidden by judicious mounting.
Ref: TOP 137
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
33.5 x 22cm


Aberdeen. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Aberdeen has been an important centre since the 12th century when it received its Royal Burgh status from King David I. Its trade rosperd and it later bacame the site of one of the country's oldest universities in 1495. By the time this print was taken its economy rested mainly upon fishing, paper-making, textiles and ship building. The town suffered at the hands of both parties during the 14th century wars of independence, but recovered, and was subsequently strongly fortified, only to be plundered by both sides in the in 1640's wars of the 3 kingdoms (the civil war). Today it is Scotland's 3rd largest city, with a booming oil-based economy. This print has a small area of worm damage, just impinging the bottom-left hand corner.
Ref: TOP 130
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1876/7
£8
16.5 x 24cm


Aberdeenshire - A River Scene Near Braemar,. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print, engraved by J.W. Whymper after a drawing by P. Skelton, gives a romantic view of Highland scenery near Braemar. The river shown looks too small to be the Dee, but may be the River Clunie, a tributary of the Dee on the banks of which the two independent hamlets stood, which became known as Braemar from about 1870. The area became very popular for tourism after Prince Albert's purchase of the Balmoral estate in 1852, and the construction of today's Balmoral Castle, completed in 1856.
Ref: TOP 221
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£9
25.5 x 32.5cm


Montrose in Angus and Channery in Ross-shire. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c 1783, and then as a complete work from 1784
Ref: TOP 135
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1787/8
£10
23 x 16.5cm


Dunbartonshire - Ben Lomond and the Isle of Inveruglas. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print, engraved by J.W. Whymper, shows the northern end of Loch Lomond, with the mountain of Ben Madui ( at 974 metres the most southerly of the Munros) in the background, and the Isle of Inveruglas in the foreground. On the isle are visible the ruins of the Castle of the Clan MacFarlane, destroyed by Cromwell in the civil war.
Ref: TOP 216
 
G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
34 x 21.5cm


Inverness. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Inverness stands at the north-eastern end of the Great Glen, beyond which the River Ness meets the sea. A Pictish settlement existed on the site from the 6th century, and the town received its first charter from King David I in the 12th century. Inverness has survived many troubles - raids from the Lords of the Isles, the campaings of the the English during the wars of Independence, and the Jacobite uprisings, culminating the nearby Battle of Culloden. Today it is regarded as the capital of the Highlands, and is regularly voted as one of the most pleasant places to live in the country. This print has a small worm-hole in the lower margin (just to the left of the title on the image.)
Ref: TOP 134
 
A. Hogg G.A. Walpoole    The New British Traveller 1784
£15
35 x 23cm


Perthshire - The Town of Perth. The New British Traveller was one of a number of publications by Alexander Hogg aiming to tap the bouyant market for works on British topography and antiquities. It included text on each couny, a set of county maps by T. Conder and others, and numerous copperplate prints by a variety of engravers. The work was initially issued in 60 parts from c1783, and then as a complete work from 1784. Situated on the River Tay, Perth is a relatively modern name for the town, which until the mid 17th century was known as St. Johnstoun, the parish church being dedicated to John the Baptist. It was created a Royal Burgh in the 12th century, from which time the Kings of Scotland also came to be crowned at nearby Scone Abbey. The town was always a centre for trade, both locally and internationally, and around the time of this print was known for its linen, leather, bleach and distilling industries. A small area of worm damage to the bottom-left corner of the print, but would still mount-up successfully.
Ref: TOP 131
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1876/7
£8
16 x 24cm


Perthshire - Glen Tilt. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut printwas engraved by J.W. Whymper after a drawing by W.H.J. Boot, and shows a generalised view of Glen Tilt, a scenic glen running roughly north-east for some 14 miles from Blair Atholl. The glen is overlooked by mountains including the impressive Beinn a' Ghlo, and has been quarried for its marble at various times. In the mid 19th century it was the subject of a dispute between the landowner, George Murray. 6th Duke of Atholl, and the recently formed Scottish Rights of Way Society. The Society won and the Duke was prevented from closing the glen to public access.
Ref: TOP 219
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1876/7
£10
22.5 x 17cm


Perthshire - Silver Strand, Loch Katrine. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print was engraved by J.W. Whymper, and shows a well known beauty spot in the Trossachs. Silver Strand is a beach on a short promontary on the northern shore of Loch Katrine jusr opposite Ellen's Isle. It has attracted artists (including Turner) and photographers since the late 18th century, and was popularised by Sir Walter Scott's poem "The Lady of the Lake" published in 1810. Loch Katrine runs for 8 miles through Strath Gartney, and has since 1859 been Glasgow's main source of drinking water.
Ref: TOP 218
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1876/7
£8
15.5 x 23cm


Mount Benvenue, Perthshire. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print was engraved by J.W. Whymper after a drawing by T.C.L. Rowbotham. It shows Mount Benvenue which stands on the southern shore of Loch Katrine, and rises to 2,393 feet. The mountain was celebrated in Sir Walter Scott's poe, "The Lady of the Lake", which describes it as "Crags, knolls, and mounds, confusedly hurl'd, The fragments of an earlier world".
Ref: TOP 217
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1876
£10
16.5 x 24cm


County Antrim, Ulster - The Giant's Causeway. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print shows The Giant's Caseway, on the Antrim coast, noted for its rock formations of hexagonal, basalt columns. The site shares this geological peculiarity with Fingal's Cave on the island of Staffa in the Scottish Hebrides, and the two are linked by legend. Finn MacCool was reutedly an Irish giant, who was challenged to a fight by the Scottish giant Benandonner. Finn constructed a causeway across the Irish Sea so they could meet. This was subsequently destroyed, though its remains survive on the coasts at both ends. The legend was used for an epic 17th century poem by James Macpherson.
Ref: TOP 211
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1876
£8
16.5 x 24cm


County Donegal, Ulster - Carrigan Head. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print shows the headland of Carrigan Head on the Atlantic coast of Donegal. The headland is part of the wider mountain of Slieve League, rising to 1972 feet, and comprising some of the tallest and steepest sea cliffs in Europe. The building shown in the print is a defensive watchtower, constructed around 1800, as part of Ireland's defence against possible French invasion during the Napoleonic wars. It still stands today.
Ref: TOP 209
 
Author not known.   Picturesque Europe c1876
£8
16 x 24.5cm


County Donegal, Ulster - One Man's Pass, Slieve League. Picturesque Europe was a serialised patwork, designed as a showcase for steel and wood engravings after and by significant artists of the day. The 60 parts were published monthly from 1875 to 1880.When sets of parts were completed, they were also sold as complete volumes, building to a full 5-volume set, 2 volumes of which were devoted to the British Isles.This wood-cut print shows the track known as One Man's Pass, a razor-edge ridge which must be traversed to reach the summit of the mountain of Slieve League (which translates as grey mountain). Slieve League lies directly on the Atlatic coast of Donegal, with some of the tallest and steepest sea cliifs in Europe falling sheer to the ocean below.
Ref: TOP 210